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One reason is to put the black market out of business. Organized crime might have to go back to highjacking trucks for an income.
Another reason is, it isn't super harmful, large numers of people use it anyway, and for some, there are medicinal benifits.
 

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One reason is to put the black market out of business. Organized crime might have to go back to highjacking trucks for an income.
Another reason is, it isn't super harmful, large numbers of people use it anyway, and for some, there are medicinal benefits. It also would free up court time for serious matters, in lieu of useless procecutions of users.
 

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The sole reason is that the Prime Minister is a toker and it was a way to attract the votes of a certain demographic. It positioned him as progressive and with it.

If we had had any one else running for the liberals it would not have been on the table at this point

I can't begin to count the number of posts I have seen on various forums and Reddit where people say they voted for him because of one of two things
legalization of pot
reform of election process

Many of those folks are now sounding off on how disappointed they are in his performance to date.

Having said that, I think the longer term, pot would have become legal in Canada anyway but it would have taken another 5 - 10 years.
 

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Prohibition doesn’t work.

New revenue stream for the government.

Probably more the second than the first.
 

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Despite all efforts, there have still been far too many old stock Canadian 20-somethings turning into responsible, productive 30-somethings who won't vote for Jr.

Let's try keeping the next batch perpetually stoned and unemployable and see if that works.
 

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Those who want to be stoned, got stoned. Those who don’t didn’t. I don’t really see how legalizing it changes anything. I’m not lining up to start using, most of the people I know are of the same opinion.

The ones who are lining up, now contribute to the tax base and help pay for the health care they’ve been using at our expense.
 

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^ You really don't think there will be a significant increase in usage?

And how is extra money going to taxes better than that same money going to the "black market" and being spent in the lower-middle class economy, pre-tax.
 

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Are you going to rush out and buy? Are your friends and relatives? It wasn’t hard to get before if you wanted it, why would making it legal make you suddenly want to get it?

I think we will become aware of how many people were previously using, however I’m sure there will still be many closet users as well. Do I think these numbers will increase? Maybe a little, especially at first, but then it will normalize to probably very close to today’s numbers. Remember, many people have used or are using already...including our prime minister.

If you don’t know the answer to your second question, then you really don’t understand economics.
 

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I hate cigarette smoke and I am certainly not in favour of adding more smoke of any kind. I am for cannabis products that don't produce smoke and have no problem with making them legal.
 

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Really, where would you, someone who doesn't partake presumably and is upper upper middle class with oodles of rental cash flow, first go to get the "not hard to get" weed? Let's not pretend than anything greater than some ~10% of Canadians have direct access to a person with marijuana for sale, when they want it. Opportunistically smoking because someone in your social group was able to procure it is the norm. I'm from lower middle class rural Ontario and I still only know a few guys who are regulars who I could partake with if I wanted, and I'm sure they would have a problem with selling to me other than infrequently. To gain further access I would need direct contact with a far far riskier person than my friends, and there is no way in hell I am doing that. Neither are you or most Canadians.

Please explain the (black market) economics then and how that is detrimental to the economy. I don't know much about black markets. I'm not being confrontational, I'd like to know, if you know. :)

As I can see it, unless the majority of the end user's money is somehow leaving the country, then that money is circulating, untaxed, in the economy, to the great benefit of the lower middle class... Drug dealers pay rent and go to Boston Pizza too, and gangs buy motorcycles.
How will the new system work? Government takes 30% off the top and the remainder of the profits go to bigger and bigger corporations, as the industry consolidates over the coming years? You don't seem to be an advocate of more taxes, nor for big corps kept in power by regulatory authorities.
 

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Maybe you don’t know how to find drugs, but that doesn’t mean it’s hard. I’ve been approached by dealers at shopping malls, probably half my tenants have easy access, I’ve got relatives that use, my kids are still in school...drugs are everywhere if you open your eyes. Heck, my first house was two doors away from a pizza restaurant that never sold any pizza, but did a lot of deliveries.

When I lived in small town Ontario, you could get drugs from any of the local farm workers. In BC drugs are all over the place. Sellers are all around their safe injection sites.

Despite all my “insider” knowledge, no one in my immediate family chooses to use, not even my kids.

I’m actually not against controlling the quality of the product, I’ve known too many people injured by tainted drugs. Ironically, the US government actually poisoned its own population during prohibition as an enforcement tactic...

Perhaps you should do some research into prohibition and see how the underground economy worked so well in cities like Chicago, New York, Atlantic city...then maybe do a field trip down to some of the gang controlled areas of town, maybe during a turf war, before you tell me about all the benefits of the underground economy. Then tell me how all this money gets to the health care system (to take care of the people who used tainted drugs) from buying stolen motorcycles for cash.
 

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^ You really don't think there will be a significant increase in usage?

And how is extra money going to taxes better than that same money going to the "black market" and being spent in the lower-middle class economy, pre-tax.
No. And to the extent it does increase usage, it is more dose controlled (illicit weed can have THC content all over the map and is laden when pesticides), and displaces alcohol, tobacco and opioid use, all of which are likely more harmful. It is already a massive business in Canada (multiple billions $/year), but that is captured by organized crime.

The reason we are legalizing pot is that there is no good reason for it to be illegal.
 

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Please explain the (black market) economics then and how that is detrimental to the economy. I don't know much about black markets. I'm not being confrontational, I'd like to know, if you know. :)

As I can see it, unless the majority of the end user's money is somehow leaving the country, then that money is circulating, untaxed, in the economy, to the great benefit of the lower middle class... Drug dealers pay rent and go to Boston Pizza too, and gangs buy motorcycles.
One downside is that without government enforcement of contracts and regulation of anticompetitive activity, the black market tends to settle these matters with violence. Sometimes that takes place in private, but sometimes that means bullets spraying a sidewalk outside a club in Toronto and hitting bystanders. And because the profits are so large, they are worth fighting over despite the risk of incarceration. And people who get recruited to such organizations at a low level to distribute drugs tend to get trapped and induced to commit greater crimes.
 

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Really, where would you, someone who doesn't partake presumably and is upper upper middle class with oodles of rental cash flow, first go to get the "not hard to get" weed? Let's not pretend than anything greater than some ~10% of Canadians have direct access to a person with marijuana for sale, when they want it.
There are about a dozen online MOM sites out of Vancouver with a dizzying (pun) selection of consumables. Canada Post delivers discreetly in a few days across Canada.
I'm not sure what their overall future will be after tomorrow. I thought their competitiveness was pretty secure, but according to those in the business in Nelson, they are worried: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/black-market-marijuana-growers-nelson-b-c-1.4863745
 

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Never used it and certainly won't be starting now. I believe there will be a huge negative impact on our healthcare system down the road, as a result of this. I think there may also be road safety concerns. Meanwhile, our idiot PM is trying to make himself popular, whilst raising more taxes to squander. The only good thing to come out of this, is I have made some nice profits trading on all the hype.
 

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We were considering buying a condo in a high rise last year. Our realtor was/is an experienced pro. Halfway through one conversation about condo high rise living she commented that most larger buildings have at least one drug dealer. We were taken aback by this.
 

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Marijuana prohibition is too costly to police and adjudicate through the courts.

The government will collect tax revenue AND spend less on police and courts.

Resources can be allocated to more important needs.

Marijuana is easier for teens to buy than cigarettes or alcohol. It is sold everywhere with no id necessary.
 

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Marijuana prohibition is too costly to police and adjudicate through the courts.

The government will collect tax revenue AND spend less on police and courts.

Resources can be allocated to more important needs.

Marijuana is easier for teens to buy than cigarettes or alcohol. It is sold everywhere with no id necessary.
Good response Sags. As a non user I have been wondering why the government was legalizing it and your response answered my question very simply. No doubt its also safer than the unknown stuff you buy from a dealer.
 
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