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you can see why the relationship between land-rich northern nations who have never ceded their territories & crowded land-poor southern reserves stretches like an umbilical cord across canada.

to over-simplify, one could say that the northern nations have land but no money, while the southern nations have money but no land.

warming climate change is making/will make those vast isolated northern territories more habitable & more vital with increased population.

i'm just looking out 100 years or so. Assuming mankind lasts that long. I'm wondering whether indigenous sovereign nation separation is a future that could actually break up canada, perhaps in the next century.

indigenous nations, for example, have coastlines & access to tidewater. The northwest passage is becoming navigable.

whereas landlocked southern alberta separation is a fantasy voiced mainly by old-timers who haven't yet grasped that the sun is setting on their principal industry.
 

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The native groups have a window of opportunity to deal with a more conciliatory Liberal government right now.

They would be well advised to move forward in haste to secure agreements, even if they fall short of 100% satisfaction.

A future government might well consider everything already long since settled and dismiss the native claims out of hand.

For starters, the native groups need to form one voice to represent them in discussions. They don't appear to even agree with each other.
 

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The native groups have a window of opportunity to deal with a more conciliatory Liberal government right now.

They would be well advised to move forward in haste to secure agreements, even if they fall short of 100% satisfaction.

A future government might well consider everything already long since settled and dismiss the native claims out of hand.

For starters, the native groups need to form one voice to represent them in discussions. They don't appear to even agree with each other.
Each First Nation is independent, though they may have some common concerns.

Secondly they don't always have clear governance systems that can negotiate.
In addition some feel that any leadership that doesn't respect their basic human rights isn't legitimate.
For example the pipeline is a conflict between the elected government, and split opinions between some of the hereditary chiefs in the area.

Some will say only the elected councils are legitimate.
Some say the hereditary chiefs are the legitimate authority.
The further problem is that it is likely impossible to get unanimous agreement amongst any large group of people, and you basically arrive at an impasse.

Canadians are generally ok and appreciate that our elected officials are empowered to act on our behalf.
The first Nations don't necessarily have such representation.

The term first Nations is important, as it helps frame the discussion, the Canadian government is dealing with many independent groups, not just a single group. As independent nations they don't necessarily consent to being represented by parties from a separate nation who may not have their interests in mind.


Then dump in a lot of distrust and racism, and you have a big mess.
There is racism in both directions, I find the pejorative "white mans" deeply offensive for example.
Insisting that the first Nations act as a single group is as ignorant as expecting Canada to just "pick one official language."
 

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Hereditary chiefs, is that like a royal family? Someone should tell them the Divine Right of Kings went out 200 years ago. Of the Royal Families that survive, their function is purely ceremonial or symbolic.

If one of these Hereditary Chiefs were to be elected by popular vote that would confirm that they speak for the people, otherwise, whoever won the election is in charge. Just as in England you have an elected Prime Minister and an un elected Queen, but everyone knows the Prime Minister and Parliament have the real power. If neither had the last word nothing would ever get done.
 

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Hereditary chiefs, is that like a royal family? Someone should tell them the Divine Right of Kings went out 200 years ago. Of the Royal Families that survive, their function is purely ceremonial or symbolic.

If one of these Hereditary Chiefs were to be elected by popular vote that would confirm that they speak for the people, otherwise, whoever won the election is in charge. Just as in England you have an elected Prime Minister and an un elected Queen, but everyone knows the Prime Minister and Parliament have the real power. If neither had the last word nothing would ever get done.
Personally I think the UN is a disfunctional mess, but since the lefties love to appeal to them as some grand authority.

https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/
Article 21.
 

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Hereditary chiefs, is that like a royal family? Someone should tell them the Divine Right of Kings went out 200 years ago. Of the Royal Families that survive, their function is purely ceremonial or symbolic.

If one of these Hereditary Chiefs were to be elected by popular vote that would confirm that they speak for the people, otherwise, whoever won the election is in charge. Just as in England you have an elected Prime Minister and an un elected Queen, but everyone knows the Prime Minister and Parliament have the real power. If neither had the last word nothing would ever get done.
Imagine if the mayor of a small town of 1500 people (like the average reserve) was drawing a tax free $100,000 salary and had the power to decide who got the limited government paid for housing and how the millions of government funding was distributed. Also imagine that they never would have to account to the federal government how most of the money was spent.

If you were a chief, why would you want to change things?
 

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there's no way all members of the wet'suwet'en nation can agree on a new form of government for themselves - one that will include & balance the interests of the hereditary clan system & the elected band councils - by march 13th 2020.

absolutely no way. Two weeks is not even enough time, in winter, to organize local assemblies for discussion. Feast halls. Call them what you will.

the fed & provincial gummints must have known this. What they did, with their mini-summit meeting last weekend, was 1) initiate the process of confirming aspects of Delgamuukw, a process that could take years; also 2) on a practical level, Bennett & Fraser negotiated another whack of time during which coastal gasLink could proceed unhindered with construction of the pipeline.

how long a whack of peace time, nobody knows. Apparently the hereditary chiefs are currently even tolerating the continued presence of RCMP on the morice river territory.

this could actually be a good strategy, from coastal gasLink's pov. Two steps forward, kerfuffle, pause, negotiate, another two steps forward, new kerfuffle but with considerably less strength, pause, repeat.
 

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there's no way all members of the wet'suwet'en nation can agree on a new form of government for themselves - one that will include & balance the interests of the hereditary clan system & the elected band councils - by march 13th 2020.

absolutely no way. Two weeks is not even enough time, in winter, to organize local assemblies for discussion. Feast halls. Call them what you will.

the fed & provincial gummints must have known this. What they did, with their mini-summit meeting last weekend, was 1) initiate the process of confirming aspects of Delgamuukw, a process that could take years; also 2) on a practical level, Bennett & Fraser negotiated another whack of time during which coastal gasLink could proceed unhindered with construction of the pipeline.

how long a whack of peace time, nobody knows. Apparently the hereditary chiefs are currently even tolerating the continued presence of RCMP on the morice river territory.

this could actually be a good strategy, from coastal gasLink's pov. Two steps forward, kerfuffle, pause, negotiate, another two steps forward, new kerfuffle but with considerably less strength, pause, repeat.
The first Nations already have elected councils.
Usurping the will of the people with unelected chieds is a violation of basic human rights.
The government of Canada should not recognize any government or leadership that exists in direct violation of the peoples human rights.
It is important to note that in Canada in accordance with basic human rights, all governmental functions and authority are chosen by the people or their freely elected representatives.

Canada has a strong history of respecting human rights internationally. Let's continue this by treating First Nations at least as fairly as those in far off lands.
 

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Back to the original topic, the whole pipeline approval process has nothing to do with native blockades.
I have no interest in illegal rail blockades, if the purpose is to push for recognition of illegitimate governments, that's even worse.
 

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The first Nations already have elected councils.
Usurping the will of the people with unelected chieds is a violation of basic human rights.
The government of Canada should not recognize any government or leadership that exists in direct violation of the peoples human rights.


talk about preposterous ignorance. The federal & BC gummints have just negotiated further steps in enforcing & expanding Delgamuukw (a 1997 supreme court of canada decision that recognized indigenous sovereign rule for the gitxsan & wet'suwet'en peoples)

another 2012 supreme court decision under chief justice beverley mcLachlin reinforced aspects of Delgamuukw. As this thread has noted, from time to time supreme court justices have written on the extraordinarily complicated topic of hereditary sovereign nations' rights within a federal canadian structure.

at this point in time, there's no room for nagging "shoulds" & "oughts." The wet'suwet'en people are going to speak. Not all can possibly be said by the 13th day of march this year, but there's obviously a good range of opinion in the territory. Everything from business cooperation & linkup to coastal Gas to spiritual resistance.

the least we can do is listen with respect.
 

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The first Nations already have elected councils.
Usurping the will of the people with unelected chieds is a violation of basic human rights.
The government of Canada should not recognize any government or leadership that exists in direct violation of the peoples human rights.


talk about preposterous ignorance. The federal & BC gummints have just negotiated further steps in enforcing & expanding Delgamuukw (a 1997 supreme court of canada decision that recognized indigenous sovereign rule for the gitxsan & wet'suwet'en peoples)
REMOVED FOR BREVITY

the least we can do is listen with respect.
ignorance? From the person who refuses to spell government correctly?

It not ignorance on my part. It's simply a principled stand in defence of human rights.

You can warble all you want about tradition and laws, rulings and opinions.

Human rights first.
I categorically reject any system that conflicts with basic human rights.


Of course you don't care about human rights or first Nations, and you are free to have those opinions.
However your attitude that the first Nations people are somehow undeserving of human rights is disgusting.

I've heard from many people that some peoples "aren't ready for democracy". I find such statements arrogant and offensive.

Many oppressors wish to deprive their opposition as less than human, and deny them their rights. I have to ask, for someone so informed, why do you hate First Nations people so much?
 

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there have to be numerous other unceded territories in the northern parts of various provinces

take quebec for example. Northern quebec is chock full of valuable mines & timber. The region, known as Ungava, extends to the arctic ocean, which will soon be fully navigable.

many are aware that climate change will likely open up this region. In fact extensive logging got underway a couple decades ago. North central quebec is already criss-crossed by thousands of logging roads plus a number of adventure tourists ... & the local indigenous nations are totally steamed about this. Their wildlife & fish are fleeing, in some districts have already fled.

the James Bay Agreement with the Cree nation governs only a small geographical part of quebec. The rest of vast Ungava is unspoken for, i believe.

what's going on in northern alberta, manitoba, saskatchewan, ontario? any unceded territories up there?
 

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It not ignorance on my part. /quote]


mistermatt you are one of the most pathetically ignorant parties in cmf forum


look at your own posts in this thread. The beyond-shocking hater & oppressor of indigenous rights in this thread is yourself.
You're the one who is trying to deny First Nations people their basic human rights.
But that's the first step isn't it? dehumanizing your opponent.
 

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You're the one who is trying to deny First Nations people their basic human rights.

no, you've got it completely backwards. Y.O.U. are the party in this thread who keeps posting strong abuse against many legitimate indigenous voices.

mister matt i'll leave you now, though, because you're not worth talking to. Rave on in your ignorance, if you wish, about how the hereditary clan kinship system in northwest BC - with all its formidable legal underpinnings including supreme court of canada recognition - is, in your misguided opinion, nothing more than a small group of troublemakers.
 

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Another pullout influenced by the blockades.

Warren Buffett, one of the world’s most influential investors, has pulled out of a proposed $9 billion liquefied natural gas project in Quebec over concerns about railway blockades and infrastructure challenges.

ltr
The sad thing is that these massive investments disproportionately impact First Nations peoples.
The illegal actions of a few protestors has caused massive damage to our economy, particularly our more vulnerable members.
It's time for the government to act like we are in fact a nation that respects the rule of law.
 

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Berkshire refused to comment, so it is all speculation for the reasons they withdrew from the plan.

They possibly considered the lack of viability in the Teck project as an indicator of problems.
 

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These projects cost enormous capital, and the viability in a fossil fuel industry decades into an uncertain future, is causing companies to put their money elsewhere.
 
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