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Hmm.. I know quite a few teachers. None of which are frugal. They are all well paid and have plenty of toys/cabins/boats etc to keep themselves busy during their nice long summers off.

If I was to do it all over again, I would definitely consider becoming a teacher. Not only does it pay well with unbeatable perks and excellent benefits, but I imagine playing a role in shaping the future generations could be a very fulfilling job.

However, if one was to rate/compare teaching to other professional jobs based on qualifications, job-demands, work-life balance, stress/pressure, hours, etc.. I think you would find that teachers are indeed overpaid. Of course, findiing a teach that would agree with that statement would be difficult.
 

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(Sorry to be getting back to this post so late but) The Royal Mail, I hear you. I don't have a problem with saying that people should not be "expected" to work outside their normal working hours/days.

I just was surprised to hear that so bluntly from a principal - I don't know what school principals' contracts say, but I haven't really heard teachers/principals' salaries discussed as 10-month salaries, you know?

On a different topic (hey, I am taking narcotics for pain control right now, my mind is wandering) I sometimes think if I had to do it all over again I'd become a mail carrier (and speaking of The Royal Mail). I went to grad school with a letter carrier who was free to study whatever he wanted without any concerns about his future employability or worrying about getting funding, because he'd been a letter carrier for over a decade at that point. He had a "good route" and was done his work in just under 4 hours per day, leaving plenty of time for school stuff. My landlord at the time was a letter carrier too, and he said the same thing many times over - "when you have enough seniority, the amount of time you have to work goes way down."

Not to start a war here though. I don't know whether you are a letter carrier!

I have also thought (not seriously) about starting a very high-end laundry service, because I am kind of obsessed with textiles and fabric care.
 

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Teachers aren't being paid THAT much. I know a lot of people who get paid more than teachers but teachers get the last laugh with their pensions.
 

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our newspaper reports many teachers are making over $100k. I would have to think they are paid very well - we don't see too many employers paying $100k+.
 

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I'll say another thing about teachers - they are the biggest complainers! :)

Both my parents and sister are/were teachers and I don't think I've ever heard the whining that went on when various teachers would gather...
 

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our newspaper reports many teachers are making over $100k. I would have to think they are paid very well - we don't see too many employers paying $100k+.
...further to my prior post. teachers are paid well, have great pensions and have the summer off (+ March break, Xmas, Easter .....etc etc) - presumably to spend the money they made all year teaching.

sounds like a good gig to me.
 

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My daughter is a teacher, and I made a mental note of the cars in the teacher's parking lot.... Given the fact that they are all earning in excess of $80K, and that some are married to teachers as well, the cars in the lot were pretty tame. I get the feeling that, while they could afford more luxurious vehicles, it would be a bit unseemly if the parents saw the teachers' lot filled with upscale cars. It might even be an unwritten rule amongst the staff to downplay any outward signs of wealth. Just a theory.
 

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sounds like a good gig to me.
I think if you tried it, you'd find out that it's not as sweet as it sounds. I've known a lot of teachers over the years (I used to work at an organization that gave scholarships to teachers and I placed hundreds of teachers on research expeditions, plus I taught at museums and nature centers where I worked with schoolteachers and their students all day long).

Teaching is hard work, and there's a lot more to it than just standing up in front of a class for a few hours a day. There's an awful lot of administrative paperwork and reporting, required training and refresher courses, curriculum updates, public scrutiny, meetings with parents, dealing with discipline issues, etc. It may sound like you have a lot of time off, but none of the teachers I've known had as much time off as their students: during many of the "school vacation weeks" teachers are required to be in school for meetings, training, or planning sessions.

This is all based on my experience in the US, maybe it's different in Canada, and maybe I just happened to be exposed mostly to dedicated teachers who did more than the basic requirements.
 

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I am a teacher in Ontario

You're right, many teachers are frugal - many are not though.

We have a range at my school - from nice new cars, big houses, boats, trips every march break to penny pinchers who wear the same clothes every day and ride their bike to school.

If you want to know exactly how much teachers make, you can find many of our collective agreements (with salary grids) are posted online:

http://www.nearnorth-osstf.org/Teachers/TBUContract_2008_2012.pdf
Toronto Schools
KPDSB

Not too many teachers have cracked the 100,000 mark yet - those that have are taking addition duties (night school, department head) to push them over the mark. In my relatively small board, there is only one teacher who made the ontario sunshine list.

I've been at it for 6 years now, and have taken courses to reach "level 4". My salary is around 68,000 - next year 74,000 and at the end of this contract 80,000. By the time I hit the top of the grid (year 10, level 11) it'll likely be over 100,000. (94,000 right now - it all depends on who's running the government of the day)

It's odd that an earlier poster said that a principal refused to come in over the summer - principals are generally on a different schedule than teachers, and they don't get as many holidays as we do.

As far as the gig itself, it's a decent enough way to make a living - you are definitely a public figure as was mentioned below - esp. if you live in a small town. Every teenager you encounter (working in stores or out in public) will know who you are.

You have to be careful to remember that it's "just a job" - I've worked hard to cut back on the amount of myself that I put into it, because a school will suck away your entire life if you let it.

Any questions about the job itself, feel free to ask.
 

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I think if you tried it, you'd find out that it's not as sweet as it sounds.....Teaching is hard work, and there's a lot more to it than just standing up in front of a class for a few hours a day. There's an awful lot of administrative paperwork and reporting, required training and refresher courses, curriculum updates, public scrutiny, meetings with parents, dealing with discipline issues, etc. It may sound like you have a lot of time off, but none of the teachers I've known had as much time off as their students: during many of the "school vacation weeks" teachers are required to be in school for meetings, training, or planning sessions.
I know a lot of teachers too - and I know they spend the majority of the summer golfing.

I don't doubt it is hard work. All I am saying is they are compensated well.
 

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It's a pretty useless exercise to pick a group and make an all-encompassing statement about them. I am sure we all know an example of a frugal teacher, and one who is not, or a teacher who treats their job as a vocation while others are there for the union benefits.

As a group, teachers are pretty much like everyone else.


Next topic: Why are all engineers so rude?
 

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It is possible that teachers appear frugal because there is generally very little pressure to "keep up with the joneses" in the workplace.

Teaching is one of the few careers where being a shabby dresser/socially awkward/out of style/eccentric will not hurt your career prospects in the least (after you get your first job, of course). It is all about you and the students in the classroom - if they learn from you and you can manage a classroom effectively, you can have a long happy career with regular pay raises without really ever having to conform to a corporate culture.

Nobody really cares what you drive, where you live, etc (coworkers and students alike)

Just an idea..
 

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I think you really do have to distinguish between teachers in the States and Canada. There's a really wide salary difference. Teachers here in Canada (and I have teachers in the family) are very well compensated, especially when it comes to summer breaks and benefits.

Likewise, the teachers I know are anything but frugal, though I guess it depends on standards. The teachers in my frugal family are the least frugal of the family. But they're also the most frugal of the teachers outside of the family.

I imagine teachers in the States might be less frugal than 'poor'.
 

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I live in a small coastal community in BC and for most of my life (I’m now 50) have heard stories about “cheap” school teachers. I have friends, a couple, who were both teachers in my home town and just a few years ago I actually asked him, what might this “stereotype” be all about? He wasn’t aware of it? He wasn’t aware of any of it. He too certainly has his ways with money. Usually if I can’t pin point it exactly, I just refer to these people as being funny about money!

The person in this forum who spoke of the group of teachers sharing one plate of food at a convention, is what made me decide to log in and share my two cents. In the 90’s one of our local hotels offered free nachos in the pub on Fridays between 5pm and 6pm (or something) to entice folks in for a cold one after work. My friends and family would go occasionally. Every single time, there were the teachers, maybe a group of 10-15 sharing a pitcher of tap beer and taking advantage of the free nachos on Fridays. We always had to chuckle. I worked in healthcare and sure, there are frugal docs there too! There’s one in every crowd but I have to say there is something to this perception about the teachers. I’ve always wondered why? Could it go back to the days when they had no paid time off and no unions or federations to ensure they were compensated for? You think they’d be over that by now? 🤷🏽‍♀️
 

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I really begin to wonder what teachers actually teach. Kids today can’t read, write, or do math without a calculator. They know nothing about making money outside of a job, then again neither do teachers as they get a huge pension and don’t need to worry about retirement.

why do we spend so much on teachers who can’t be fired and aren’t even teaching the basics anymore? It’s at least 25% of the provincial budgets
 

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I've been teaching for 26 years. I really enjoy the life; some summers I've worked to put more away, others I don't. I've managed to get some world traveling done through the pro-d program(s), and planned a trip, (paid for by students), to Galapagos Islands for 2 weeks following in Darwin's footsteps. Frugal? I'd say more like finding value for the time that you spend in your occupation.
I do OK salary-wise, but, throw in a family and bills, and that salary (like anyone else's I suppose) gets spread thin.
One person above said that teachers often have an understanding of math, and the significance of compound growth - I agree. Good (maybe successful is a better word) teachers are often very good at planning - it's a skill that is in every teacher's wheel-house - at if you need to plan, you often need to budget (time and money).

* I should add that teacher's pensions in the US have been hammered by hedge fund managers - read this as an example.
 

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Teachers are cheap?

I know lots of teachers with a couple earning $200k+ and still live paycheque to paycheque.

Maybe there are some teachers that are really cheap. Perhaps they hate the job and are only doing it for the money, so are hoping to accelerate their retirement.
 
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