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FORTIS (FTS)
can't even remember WHEN I bought it....but at the time, they were still called Nfld. Light & Power....so, it's been a few years! Been veddy, veddy good to me! The EverReady battery of my holdings!
 

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Well done - selling and re-buying is a good way to make more profit.
It is not difficult but you do have to watch the market make sensible decisions.
Most of it was rebalancing, or taking some profits to allocate to another/new holding where I saw some opportunity. There have probably only been 3-4 of those transactions over the years...
 

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I'm relatively new to investing, but as suggested above large-scale financial and energy stocks appear to provide reliability for long-term investing. If it could be relevant I also came across this reference (not suggesting any of these, but maybe of interest). All best : -) TMX Money
 

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I'm relatively new to investing, but as suggested above large-scale financial and energy stocks appear to provide reliability for long-term investing. If it could be relevant I also came across this reference (not suggesting any of these, but maybe of interest). All best : -) TMX Money
I thought it would be interesting to look at... but I just took a look at the top one and it seems questionable. The fact that it had a 38% yield raised some red flags considering that it was a biotech ETF. When I did a google search and looked on other sites, the price quote was $144 and 0% yield instead of $24 and 38%, so not sure what to make of that list.
 

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best sources are are sedar.com and the companies own website if you are wanting to ensure accuracy of data. Data changes quickly and sites use different metrics ex. Which P/E? Current or forward? They often just state P/E and you are left to guess unless you do the calculation yourself.
 

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One of the advantages of having huge embedded capital gains in all your stocks is to stop you from ever impulsively selling them - unless you want to jump a couple tax brackets.

ltr
We have been purposely bringing some taxable gains into income as part of a forward tax plan. Trying to manage the tax exposure on our non reg investments,
 

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BCE for over 40 years, then likely RBC for 30? years.

Just a note on returns as some people commented above. Rates of return on stock can vary dramatically based on the investment date.
If I invest on Jan 1st and you invest in the same stock on Jan 15th, our 10-year rate of return could vary quite a bit, although long periods tend to flatten this out a bit.
 

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FORTIS (FTS)
can't even remember WHEN I bought it....but at the time, they were still called Nfld. Light & Power....so, it's been a few years! Been veddy, veddy good to me! The EverReady battery of my holdings!
Me too ,My dad gifted us some of his shares , back then you could buy the stock with your bill lol. I have had it myself around 25 years I guess
 

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Ah, good old boring dividend stocks. It's like wine, better with age.
Buy, drip, buy some more, hold and forget about them.

My very first trade in 1996, [email protected]$6.53. The dividend yield currently for those shares are 54+% and growing.
My second trade was [email protected]$8.17 and the yield is over 58+% now, and growing.

To me, I always look for the number of shares and dividend. Not so much about the value....

And is still holding.

Example: ENB held for 27 years, paid about $3.75/share, now worth about $59.99/share.
So your ENB dividend yield is over 90%, and still growing ! Nice :)
 

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Ah, good old boring dividend stocks. It's like wine, better with age.
Buy, drip, buy some more, hold and forget about them.

My very first trade in 1996, [email protected]$6.53. The dividend yield currently for those shares are 54+% and growing.
My second trade was [email protected]$8.17 and the yield is over 58+% now, and growing.

To me, I always look for the number of shares and dividend. Not so much about the value....



So your ENB dividend yield is over 90%, and still growing ! Nice :)
Sadly, no. The yields are TD - 3.8%, RY - 3.6% and ENB - 6%, just like the rest of us. Yield-on-cost is a bit of window-dressing, and doesn't account for the length of time the shares are held, price appreciation, reinvestments/withdrawals, etc. The capital which those 1200 TD shares represents isn't netting you 54%, i hate to say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
^
So your ENB dividend yield is over 90%, and still growing ! Nice :)
... LOL, only I wished. I was using ENB as an example for a posting. Nevertheless, it's a compliment for those who still own it.

Ah, good old boring dividend stocks. It's like wine, better with age.
Buy, drip, buy some more, hold and forget about them.

My very first trade in 1996, [email protected]$6.53. The dividend yield currently for those shares are 54+% and growing.
My second trade was [email protected]$8.17 and the yield is over 58+% now, and growing.

To me, I always look for the number of shares and dividend. Not so much about the value....
... you've to look at RaggedyDandy's post for the "correct" "yield" (for most dividend paying stocks) which isn't north of approx. 6% for most large-cap stocks.

I think you were estimating your "growth" or rate of return (ROR) "overall" of which you still need to divide by the # of years held. Still impressive with your TD held since "1996" and still holding though. (y)
 

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^
... LOL, only I wished. I was using ENB as an example for a posting. Nevertheless, it's a compliment for those who still own it.

... you've to look at RaggedyDandy's post for the "correct" "yield" (for most dividend paying stocks) which isn't north of approx. 6% for most large-cap stocks.

I think you were estimating your "growth" or rate of return (ROR) "overall" of which you still need to divide by the # of years held. Still impressive with your TD held since "1996" and still holding though. (y)
😁 Sorry, I do not know much some of the terms and how to calculate them. Please help me out here.

Let's say the current TD stock price is $93 like today. It pays a dividend of $3.56 each year, and the dividend yield is 3.56/93 = 3.828%.
So, if I pay this stock for only $6.53 and get pay for $3.56 each year, is it not a yield of 3.56/6.53 = 54% ?
 

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So, if I pay this stock for only $6.53 and get pay for $3.56 each year, is it not a yield of 3.56/6.53 = 54%
You're mixing apples and oranges in the same formula. The $6.56 is in 1996 dollars while the $3.56 is in 2022 dollars. The resulting Yield on Cost is only a novelty stat, for your own amusement.

ltr
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
You're mixing apples and oranges in the same formula. The $6.56 is in 1996 dollars while the $3.56 is in 2022 dollars. The resulting Yield on Cost is only a novelty stat, for your own amusement.

ltr
... that's another way of saying if you Benting (more for you) and I were to buy TD today, my dividend yield would only be 3.83% as you've calculated previously. However, you've to look at the Total Return (or a rate of return) when you eventually sell. Bottomline: how much you made with that investment that's gonna to count. In Benting's case, it's some ka-ching$$$$$$$.
 
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