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"When money dies"

Just reading an interesting book about the hyper inflation that was witnessed in early Germany after World War 1.

What I find interesting is looking at real historical accounts of inflation and its impact on society and comparing it with modern day America. There seems to be a lot of similarities!

On a side note: it would be interesting to study up on which countries round the world have ditched the Gold Standard and how many of them have lead a path to their own demise.
 

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History repeating itself? Don't sweat it. Also, now is the time to get in big on tulip bulbs - seriously. Spring is coming and there's expected to be a HUGE demand. Prices for bulbs are going to rise, the opportunity exists now to get in before the surge.

I do a bit of historical reading in the financial sector, and history doesn't just repeat itself once in a while, financially, history repeats itself almost exactly and has for 500 years.
 

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Cool pics Moneygal and really interesting point Wheel. I find the history of finance really interesting. And to be honest it can have some pretty good payoff if you know the history and it repeats itself.

The only other financial history that i have read (or tried to read) is the Ascent of Money - a financial history of the world. Its pretty damn fascinating going from Shylock times to the same wealthy families from those days still running and rigging the system now.

http://www.amazon.com/Ascent-Money-Financial-History-World/dp/0143116177/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1283528045&sr=8-1
 

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History repeating itself? Don't sweat it. Also, now is the time to get in big on tulip bulbs - seriously.
Ciaran Carson has a hilarious essay on the tulip mania of the 1630s in his book "Fishing for Amber." He notes that a bulb of the black-and-amber Viceroy tulip was traded for "two lasts of wheat, four lasts of rye, four fat oxen, eight fat swine, four fat sheep, two hogsheads of wine, four tuns of beer, two tuns of butter, one thousands pounds of cheese, a complete bed, a suit of clothes, and a silver drinking cup."

He relates the story of a wealthy merchant who took a shipment of tulip bulbs; a sailor came to inform him of the ship's arrival and he rewarded the sailor with a herring for his lunch. The sailor was fond of onions, and seeing a bulb on the merchant's counter that seemed to resemble an onion, he slipped it in his pocket and ate it with his herring for lunch. Little did he know that the bulb could have fetched enough cash to feed an entire ship's crew for a year.
 
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