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....sigh....I wish I understood any of this....
He goes Jargey, lets use mailing a regular letter as an example.

Regular mail ...
  • You mail a letter to an specific address, say 123 box street, Gander, NL.
  • Canada post sends the letter directly to 123 box street, Gander, NL.
  • If they send reply mail it goes directly back to you home address.
VPN mail ...
  • You place your letter to 123 box street, Gander, NL. inside another letter.
  • The outer letter is address is 456 virtual street Chicago, IL, USA.
  • Canada post sees the Chicago, IL address and the letter goes there.
  • At Chicago, IL, they open it, change the inner letter return address to Chicago, IL.
  • They then mail your inside letter to 123 box street Gander, NL.
  • If they send reply mail, it goes back to Chicago, IL.
  • Chicago, IL then mails the return letter to your home address.
So the entire point of VPN being ...
  • It looks like, to Canada Post, you only send letters to 456 virtual street Chicago, IL, USA.
  • The final recipients of every letter you send all think they came from 456 virtual street Chicago, IL, USA.
  • The final recipients don't know your home address.
Make sense?
 

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Really? Source? The paid VPNs are selling my data? (I use Nord)


Exactly. A third party domiciled in another country that doesn't keep logs and has no interest in revealing my details.
As opposed to Rogers, Bell, Shaw, etc who would turn over my records in a heartbeat.
It is known that some VPNs are selling data.
I'm not claiming Nord does, they seem reputable, but I don't know about any third party audits.
I do know that Nord has been hacked in the past.

You don't know that the third party is not keeping logs.
You don't know if an intelligence service is monitoring.
In Russia you can only use "approved VPN services" I'm sure that means they're being tracked by Russian intelligence.

I know that Rogers & friends will turn over the records in a heartbeat.
I do know that my ISP (Teksavvy) fought to keep customer records private.

If you're using a VPN for privacy and security, I think you're fooling yourself.

If you're trying to avoid region locked content, that might work, but arguably you're violating the TOS, and therefore copyright, of the site that you're accessing. Oh, and don't start the "streaming isn't making a copy", because it absolutely IS.
 

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He goes Jargey, lets use mailing a regular letter as an example.

Regular mail ...
  • You mail a letter to an specific address, say 123 box street, Gander, NL.
  • Canada post sends the letter directly to 123 box street, Gander, NL.
  • If they send reply mail it goes directly back to you home address.
VPN mail ...
  • You place your letter to 123 box street, Gander, NL. inside another letter.
  • The outer letter is address is 456 virtual street Chicago, IL, USA.
  • Canada post sees the Chicago, IL address and the letter goes there.
  • At Chicago, IL, they open it, change the inner letter return address to Chicago, IL.
  • They then mail your inside letter to 123 box street Gander, NL.
  • If they send reply mail, it goes back to Chicago, IL.
  • Chicago, IL then mails the return letter to your home address.
So the entire point of VPN being ...
  • It looks like, to Canada Post, you only send letters to 456 virtual street Chicago, IL, USA.
  • The final recipients of every letter you send all think they came from 456 virtual street Chicago, IL, USA.
  • The final recipients don't know your home address.
Make sense?
thanks cain...makes enough sense for me to know i dont want or need it :p
 

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thanks cain...makes enough sense for me to know i dont want or need it :p
I sort of decided the same. But I did subscribe to free version of Windscribe - It is Toronto based. You get 50Gb per month at no cost. Limited number of countries, but enough. I use it occasionally to make it look like I am in a different place. Mainly so I can receive TV broadcasts that might be geo locked where I am.

BTW - Welcome back :)
 

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I use it to avoid hearing from my ISP when obtaining things on the high seas.

Some legitimate uses can be to spoof your location when shopping for things like airfare, as pricing can be strongly dependent on your location.
 

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So the entire point of VPN being ...
  • It looks like, to Canada Post, you only send letters to 456 virtual street Chicago, IL, USA.
  • The final recipients of every letter you send all think they came from 456 virtual street Chicago, IL, USA.
  • The final recipients don't know your home address.
Make sense?
Most good VPN service add a layer of encryption as well

Regular
  • Most of the time it's like sending post cards that anyone can easily read if they want to
  • Some is scrambled to look like gibberish that can be unscrambled by the recipient such as online banking
VPN
  • All the information you put on the postcard is scrambled to look like gibberish
  • All that information is then unscrambled at the VPN server (Chicago)
The point is that if someone is snooping your information between you and Chicago it will be unreadable. They could still try to snoop between Chicago and the final recipient, but this avoids bad actors with control of local equipment targeting local traffic

DNS server is another topic. You should always just go manually change your DNS settings away from the default because it's very easy and free. Certain bad actors manipulate and track the default DNS servers especially in certain countries
 

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Most good VPN service add a layer of encryption as well

Regular
  • Most of the time it's like sending post cards that anyone can easily read if they want to
  • Some is scrambled to look like gibberish that can be unscrambled by the recipient such as online banking
VPN
  • All the information you put on the postcard is scrambled to look like gibberish
  • All that information is then unscrambled at the VPN server (Chicago)
The point is that if someone is snooping your information between you and Chicago it will be unreadable. They could still try to snoop between Chicago and the final recipient, but this avoids bad actors with control of local equipment targeting local traffic

DNS server is another topic. You should always just go manually change your DNS settings away from the default because it's very easy and free. Certain bad actors manipulate and track the default DNS servers especially in certain countries
Most websites are enryped (ie the envelope). Google downranks unencrypted websites.
Look at your open tabs, how many of those sites are unencrypted?
 

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If you're using a VPN for privacy and security, I think you're fooling yourself.
It's like locking your door or anything else. I could say "dO yOu tHink LoCking YoUr DoOr MaKeS YUo sAFe pUnk?" Hah I can just use a crowbar

Just like anything else a layer of security and privacy is just that. It can always be breached with additional effort but busting down a door or opening a letter is also much different than walking though a wide open door or reading an open post card

If you're trying to avoid region locked content, that might work, but arguably you're violating the TOS, and therefore copyright, of the site that you're accessing. Oh, and don't start the "streaming isn't making a copy", because it absolutely IS.
A lot of sports seem to be region locked. CBC streams HNIC and the Olympics etc to Canadian devices but not to devices outside the country. So a soldier in Afghanistan or a traveler in RandomCounty has no option to watch hockey or whatever geo locked sport in RandomCountry that doesn't even watch hockey

CBC, and many other broadcasters around the world, stream for free. For example no service in Canada streams the Dakar rally because most Canadians have never heard of it. In certain countries every YouTube video with music is blocked because the music is copywritten and they read the rules. Who wants that BS? Nobody but lawyers

You may not even know what part of the internet you're missing if it's been blocked or filtered out by your ISP, government, lawyers, or search engine etc. The whole region lock on sports was setup before the internet and globalization and makes zero sense today.
 

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Most good VPN service add a layer of encryption as well
https is already encrypted, almost nobody uses plain http anymore so VPN encryption isn't really needed.

DNS server is another topic. You should always just go manually change your DNS settings away from the default because it's very easy and free. Certain bad actors manipulate and track the default DNS servers especially in certain countries
I don't see an issue with your ISP's DNS at home but if you're away on public Wifi, I guess you could change it. Of course I wouldn't be doing anything "secure" over public wifi anyways.
 

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Most websites are enryped (ie the envelope). Google downranks unencrypted websites.
Look at your open tabs, how many of those sites are unencrypted?
Your email

Your DNS

Your location

I can tell a lot about you from those three wide open doors
 

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Your email

Your DNS

Your location

I can tell a lot about you from those three wide open doors
My email access to is over HTTPS or POP/TLS.
DNS, Yes, they know the server I'm contacting. This is why governments are trying to block DNS over HTTPS.

You do realize that the VPN provider has all this information.
You're just changing who you're trusting. That's my point, you're trusting X-VPN, and you don't really know who that is. Many VPNs are really just resellers.
 

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In Russia you can only use "approved VPN services" I'm sure that means they're being tracked by Russian intelligence.
So you're saying Russia doesn't like "unapproved VPN services" Why do you think that is?

NATO soldiers on the Russian border are instructed to use a VPN service on all their devices. You can google some of the things that happened to those who didn't. For people living in China or other authoritative regimes, a VPN service is the only way to access much of the internet. China and Russia want to create their own segregated internet so VPNs don't work anymore

You can say a locked door can be defeated.. it still has a purpose. People still lock things in a safe behind the locked door. A VPN clouds the address to the door.
 

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So you're saying Russia doesn't like "unapproved VPN services" Why do you think that is?

NATO soldiers on the Russian border are instructed to use a VPN service on all their devices. You can google some of the things that happened to those who didn't. For people living in China or other authoritative regimes, a VPN service is the only way to access much of the internet. China and Russia want to create their own segregated internet so VPNs don't work anymore

You can say a locked door can be defeated.. it still has a purpose. People still lock things in a safe behind the locked door. A VPN clouds the address to the door.
I think the reason Russia doesn't like "unapproved VPN services" is because they've infiltrated all the approved ones.

Which is exactly my point. You need to have a VPN service you can trust. They must also be secure.

Do you have any data that indicates any particular VPN service is both secure and trustworthy?
There is data to suggest some VPN services should not be trusted for privacy.
 

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Anyone looked at Brave browser? It apparently does some of what vpns do. Also has built in ad blocking and security.
 

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Just thought I'd raise this.
If you're using a VPN for privacy, I think you're fooling yourself.



"No Logs"
Then when the logs were posted it took 2 weeks for them to hide them.

I have no idea how they would have even gotten passwords, that's nuts.
 

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Mozilla (Firefox) is promoting their VPN service. I have never used VPN before except a long time ago with work laptops when away from the office.

Any techie gurus have comments on Mozilla's offering?
 

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