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There are piles of jobs, everyone is hiring.
The people who are unemployed just don't want those jobs.
Perhaps. Guess it depends where you are.
I know that for a job I started in July (it was a shitty pay, 22/h but was supposed to be super cool and fast pace of learning) had 350 applications for one spot.
The job that I moved on 3 weeks ago (previous one didn't turn out so cool because of scrapping plans for renewables investment in Edmonton), had 1500 applicants for 4 spots.
Also, official statistics show there is twice as many unemployed as job openings.
In US there is more job openings than unemployed, but not in Canada.
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 · (Edited)
Perhaps. Guess it depends where you are.
I know that for a job I started in July (it was a shitty pay, 22/h but was supposed to be super cool and fast pace of learning) had 350 applications for one spot.
The job that I moved on 3 weeks ago (previous one didn't turn out so cool because of scrapping plans for renewables investment in Edmonton), had 1500 applicants for 4 spots.
Also, official statistics show there is twice as many unemployed as job openings.
In US there is more job openings than unemployed, but not in Canada.
$22/hr is pretty good pay, depending on skills and experience.

Also number of applicants is pretty meaningless, lots of jobs get completely unsuitable candidates who are just spamming resumes.
 

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There are piles of jobs, everyone is hiring.
The people who are unemployed just don't want those jobs.
There will always be unemployment. Anything under a the 3 percent level is considered to be flux, not unemployment.

There will always be those who lack the basic people skills or job skills/training to obtain a job or to keep a job. As an example, my son in law had a call at 2 in the morning from a prospective hire who wanted him to send this person money so that he could pay for a tow truck. He had not even been hired yet. Guess what...that person was not hired and is probably a EI statistic.

Then there are others who are unemployed or under employed because they will not relocate to where the jobs are. My spouse hails from a small Ontario town. She knows of relatives and friends who are reluctant to move from their high school friends or from under mommy's apron.

They are the same people who think we are ' lucky' to have had the jobs, positions and the experiences that we have. All it took was some post secondary training or edu,, relocating to where the opportunities happened to be (several times), and putting in 12 hours days with no OT payments from time to time. And a little ambition with an eye to the end game, not the current period.
 

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Discussion Starter · #84 ·
There will always be unemployment. Anything under a the 3 percent level is considered to be flux, not unemployment.

There will always be those who lack the basic people skills or job skills/training to obtain a job or to keep a job. As an example, my son in law had a call at 2 in the morning from a prospective hire who wanted him to send this person money so that he could pay for a tow truck. He had not even been hired yet. Guess what...that person was not hired and is probably a EI statistic.

Then there are others who are unemployed or under employed because they will not relocate to where the jobs are. My spouse hails from a small Ontario town. She knows of relatives and friends who are reluctant to move from their high school friends or from under mommy's apron.

They are the same people who think we are ' lucky' to have had the jobs, positions and the experiences that we have. All it took was some post secondary training or edu,, relocating to where the opportunities happened to be (several times), and putting in 12 hours days with no OT payments from time to time. And a little ambition with an eye to the end game, not the current period.
Having moved hours away from my hometown, I understand this.
I like where I live, but there are lots of other places I'd rather live, they just don't have the jobs I need to support my family.

Too many people are unwilling to make these trade offs.

You can't afford to live in location X, don't live there, There aren't any jobs where I am, don't be there.
 

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$22/hr is pretty good pay, depending on skills and experience.

Also number of applicants is pretty meaningless, lots of jobs get completely unsuitable candidates who are just spamming resumes.
Had to have an engineering degree for it.
But the point is - job market doesn't look particularly well, especially if you start comparing it to other nations.
Economy in Canada is struggling and it seems like every single promise or action taken is to make it struggle even more. Destroying productivity while printing money.
 

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Had to have an engineering degree for it.
But the point is - job market doesn't look particularly well, especially if you start comparing it to other nations.
Economy in Canada is struggling and it seems like every single promise or action taken is to make it struggle even more. Destroying productivity while printing money.
I believe that the job market is always dependent on where you live, your skills, and the market demand for those skills. We have several friends in Calgary who changed their occupations/vocations because of the downturn in the oil patch and the amalgamations. Others who went back to acquire new skills. It is one reason why there has been net migration of young people from Alberta to other provinces over the past year. Especially to BC and to Ontario.

I worked for a multi national IT firm. It was surprising how many senior managers and execs ended up in positions or streams that were very different from the positions they originally hired into based on their then current skills.

I believe the last estimate I saw was expectation that people would have 5-8 employers over their working lives and change their careers, vocations, whatever at least 2-3 times during their working lives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·

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Our son works on large construction projects and they have projects lined up for years into the future.

I don't know about other Provinces, but Ontario is booming with construction. Many of those projects are going to be filled with employees in the future.

His company is always looking to hire experienced skilled trades, but most young adults don't have the skills or the desire to do the work.

His union told him that his wage and benefit package is worth $130K a year.

Not bad for a kid who was told by his high school VP that he wouldn't amount to much.

Get a skill trade or several, get hired by a big unionized construction company, work for 25 years and retire with a fat DB pension.

That is my advice to young adults today.
 

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From an FP article: The most recent data from Stats Can shows workplaces have 800000 positions vacant.
From the same article: When the CRB and enhanced EI come to an end, some 1.1 million people will suddenly find themselves without an income.
The dole is so significant that cutting it off will contract GDP 1.7% over the space of just two months , something that could prolong the recovery.
So the rise in household income over the course of the pandemic and the recovery is fuelled by borrowed money printed out of thin air. Lots of jobs available and lots of people to fill them but that would go against the agenda of the current govt to create a welfare state supported by "other people's money", the ultra rich, all 20 or 30 of them. My bet is on the dole being extended again. And again, and again.
 

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Our son works on large construction projects and they have projects lined up for years into the future.

I don't know about other Provinces, but Ontario is booming with construction. Many of those projects are going to be filled with employees in the future.

His company is always looking to hire experienced skilled trades, but most young adults don't have the skills or the desire to do the work.

His union told him that his wage and benefit package is worth $130K a year.

Not bad for a kid who was told by his high school VP that he wouldn't amount to much.

Get a skill trade or several, get hired by a big unionized construction company, work for 25 years and retire with a fat DB pension.

That is my advice to young adults today.
I was a manager/director in a non union business. Three companies, two mergers. Our benefits were deemed at one time to similar to Gov't beneiftis...but not our company funded DB.

The highest number that I worked with was an overhead uplift of 52/54 percent of salary that was attributable to all company benefits, vacation, training, with the exception of the stock plan and any stock options granted. By the time I left 25 years later that uplift number was down to the mid twenties.
 

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