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We have been using MediPac insurance for our winter travel/snowbirding to the US for the last 4 years. Partly the reason for use was recommendation by the Canadian Snowbirds Association PLUS it allowed the use of my wife's SuperAn federal gov't insurance for partial coverage.

Unfortunately the use of O2 is now required and Medipac automatically excludes a person if on O2; they have a separate underwriting for those with conditions that exclude normal insurance, but I suspect it is quite pricey.

I am a RBC client and so its insurance is available and while there are some restrictions, it does not automatically exclude a person using O2. Price is not too bad either. Plus they have (supposedly) no limit whereas Medipac was $2M or $5M if opted for extra package. Medipac had different deductibles - we usually took the $1000 as anything less, might as well pay it. The RBC doesn't seem to have a deductible.

I'm just seeing what others are using and their experiences with different companies.
 

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You might try Tugo...which is part of Canadian Direct Insurance. Their HQ is in the Lower Mainland. I have a paper with their toll free number. 1 855 929 TUGO
 

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I know there have been many discussions on Travel Health Insurance for Snowbirds. But the CMF search found this as the latest one and it doesn't offer much.

For those of you retirees, which plans are you currently using? And which one are you avoiding?

We have in past used three.
- First RBC insurance (became expensive, but have not checked recently)
- Medi-Quote Insurance brokers. Reasonable at time.
- CAA Travel Insurance (Orion Insurance) ( Used them because they have max of ($5000 + deductible) if medical questionnaire deemed to be inaccurate)

Have looked at but not used Medi-Pac site (Canadian snowbird Association recommend them)

Any other suggestions?

So far costs look like they will be over $2100 for the two of us for 3 months. Both healthy with no issues. Crazy really, when we only pay 1/2 of that per year for our car insurance (two daily drivers) with 2Million liability.
 

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So far on-line quotations favour RBC

RBC Insurance $2102 no deductible (client rate)
Medi-Quote $2112 with $500 deductible
CAA Travel Ins $2385 with $500 deductible
CAA Travel Ins $2231 with $1000 deductible (But max of $6000 if medical answers deemed inaccurate)
Tugo $2618 with $300 deductible
Medi-Pac didn't note final price, but about same as Tugo and way too many medical questions.
GMS $2825 with no ded, $2310 with $1000 ded,

Too bad RBC doesn't offer a deductible (along with lower price). If we had some minor medical need, it would save having to call them before getting treatment (and paying for it!)

We would like to stay with CAA, but deductible would need to be $3000 to bring cost in line with RBC.

Maybe we should just go for 2 months next year!
 

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So far on-line quotations favour RBC

RBC Insurance $2102 no deductible (client rate)
Medi-Quote $2112 with $500 deductible
CAA Travel Ins $2385 with $500 deductible
CAA Travel Ins $2231 with $1000 deductible (But max of $6000 if medical answers deemed inaccurate)
Tugo $2618 with $300 deductible
Medi-Pac didn't note final price, but about same as Tugo and way too many medical questions.
GMS $2825 with no ded, $2310 with $1000 ded,

Too bad RBC doesn't offer a deductible (along with lower price). If we had some minor medical need, it would save having to call them before getting treatment (and paying for it!)

We would like to stay with CAA, but deductible would need to be $3000 to bring cost in line with RBC.

Maybe we should just go for 2 months next year!
Can you advise what age group this insurance quote applies to?
Cheers
 

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I know there have been many discussions on Travel Health Insurance for Snowbirds. But the CMF search found this as the latest one and it doesn't offer much.

For those of you retirees, which plans are you currently using? And which one are you avoiding?

We have in past used three.
- First RBC insurance (became expensive, but have not checked recently)
- Medi-Quote Insurance brokers. Reasonable at time.
- CAA Travel Insurance (Orion Insurance) ( Used them because they have max of ($5000 + deductible) if medical questionnaire deemed to be inaccurate)

Have looked at but not used Medi-Pac site (Canadian snowbird Association recommend them)

Any other suggestions?

So far costs look like they will be over $2100 for the two of us for 3 months. Both healthy with no issues. Crazy really, when we only pay 1/2 of that per year for our car insurance (two daily drivers) with 2Million liability.

Personally we use Pacific Blue Cross and have previously used BCAA. They seem to be price competitive but we've had no claims experience. Just last week I was speaking to a lady I've known for about 3 yrs and she extoled how great medi pac (snowbirds association recommendation) was after her husbands heart attack in California. Several days in hospital, lots of tests, meds and then was medi-vac to Vancouver. She said they never saw a bill and all co ordination was excellent.
 

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If your spouse is a federal PSHCP plan member, Johnson Insurance has a plan they call MEDOC that is a supplementary plan to PSHCP. It is quite economical because it is coordinated with the $500K coverage of PSHCP.

HOWEVER, if you want more than 40 days coverage, you have to pass a health screening. I don't know, but would suspect, that being on O2 would be a pre-existing condition that would disqualify her for such extended coverage. But you could look into it.
 

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Two thoughts, comments.

It does seem that around 75 or so, medical insurance becomes a major factor for snowbirds in terms of impact on costs.

Second, this applies to those who visit the USA primarily. Has anyone considered what would differ if for example you looked at snowbirding in say Portugal?

Sometimes, I think a lot of people just do things out of habit and don't consider alternatives.
 

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Two thoughts, comments.

It does seem that around 75 or so, medical insurance becomes a major factor for snowbirds in terms of impact on costs.

Second, this applies to those who visit the USA primarily. Has anyone considered what would differ if for example you looked at snowbirding in say Portugal?

Sometimes, I think a lot of people just do things out of habit and don't consider alternatives.
For a couple of the plans that I looked at, The rates were same for USA and Portugal (and most other places)

There is a break at about 75 or 76, depending on the insurer. And some base it on when you buy the insurance rather than when you travel. So buy before your birthday works with some.
 

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We did a policy for six months out of country. Only three or four weeks were in the US. At the time I asked the underwriter exactly that question....does country visited enter into the premium calculation.. Her answer, keep in mind one company/one underwriter, was no. We were both under 65 at the time. I asked that question because the agent never asked where we intended to travel (it was to some degree flexible) prior to giving us the quote. This could of course vary with the insurer and the policy holder's age.
 

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I don't think the insurance companies will vary their rates on the basis of where you think you are going to travel. They have too little control over that. However, you may make a personal decision to purchase a policy with a lower limit of coverage (and therefore cheaper), if you are not planning to go to a country with expensive health care. But the risk is then entirely yours.
 

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However, you may make a personal decision to purchase a policy with a lower limit of coverage (and therefore cheaper), if you are not planning to go to a country with expensive health care. But the risk is then entirely yours.
None of the plans we have looked at offer lower limits of coverage. They are usually a fixed 2M, 5M or 10M depending on who you go with and often the rates are not much different. Only way to reduce cost is to increase deductible. Choices here vary by company, and some are limited. RBC, for example don't offer any deductibles.

If you know of Canadian companies that offer lower limits of coverage for snowbird travel insurance, please post them.
 

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There have been several threads on this subject. Unfortunately search function doesn't work that well. Here is another one: https://www.canadianmoneyforum.com/showthread.php/110761-Travel-insurance/page4

Have checked a few more plans , but it seems that for us as clients, RBC has lowest price and has no deductible.

From earlier post:
RBC Insurance $2102 no deductible (client rate)
Medi-Quote $2112 with $500 deductible
CAA Travel Ins $2385 with $500 deductible
CAA Travel Ins $2231 with $1000 deductible (But max of $6000 if medical answers deemed inaccurate)
Tugo $2618 with $300 deductible
Medi-Pac didn't note final price, but about same as Tugo and way too many medical questions.
GMS $2825 with no ded, $2310 with $1000 ded,
Checked through Scotia - underwritten by Manulife or NAlife. $2415 with 500 deductible
I also checked through BMO (our bank), but didn't note the prices. Not attractive - I think they worked through Allianz.

Travelguard was suggested by one CMFer. I didn't end up getting a quotation. They don't have on-line quotations. I filled in their application. A day later, received a call wanting me to answer the medical questionnaires. The agent said they would next send the completed questionaires to the insurer who would then provide a quotation.
BlueCross similar to TG. No on-line quotations for us. Decided not to pursue either.

So it looks like Royal Bank for us.
 

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For a couple of the plans that I looked at, The rates were same for USA and Portugal (and most other places)

There is a break at about 75 or 76, depending on the insurer. And some base it on when you buy the insurance rather than when you travel. So buy before your birthday works with some.
One of the problems is that as Canadians, we tend to use insurance companies that we have heard of obviously and that family and friends suggest. But if you go onto travel forums where people from many countries are found posting, you find there are worldwide companies that differ considerably from what we are used to.

One of the travel insurers that WAS considered the 'gold standard' for travel insurance for 'globe trotters', for example is World Nomads. They happen to be an Australian company. If you check their prices, you will find that the USA always costs a premium to insure for. That's simply common sense as they have the highest healthcare costs in the world. Other similar insurers who cater to all nationalities are the same. Often they have a tick box where you choose between, 'all countries excluding the USA' or 'all countries including the USA.'

Canadian insurers like RBC, CAA, etc. simply make the assumption that you may be going to the USA and all their pricing allows for that. In other words, they don't actually give you the option of 'opting out' of travel to the USA.

So for example, a company like World Nomads will cover you for 3 months anywhere in Europe or in all of Europe combined, for $860. For coverage in the USA it will be $1000. So for the USA, you will basically pay 15% more for coverage in the USA.

What's more, here in Canada we are used to 'medical coverage' rather than 'travel insurance' which covers things like trip delays, cancellations, lost luggage, etc. The prices I have quote above include all of that. Try adding it to a RBC or CAA quote and chances are the price will nearly double. Compare those prices for a 3 month trip to Portugal and see what you find.

The prices I quoted are for 3 months for a couple who are both age 65. Unfortunately, World Nomads do not offer coverage for anyone over age 65. But there are comparable companies who do if you look for them. Prices will no doubt be higher but may still be far lower than RBC or CAA. If you search for 'long term travel insurance' you will get quite different 'hits' than if you search for 'canadian snowbird insurance'.

Read this article for example: https://nomadgate.com/travel-insurance/ It is not directed at over 65 snowbirds at all but it does serve to show you the difference that comes when someone is looking at non-USA travel vs. USA included travel. Very significant differences.

Then take a look at this one for example for someone aged 60-69 who wants medical coverage only, excluding the USA it would be $410 (USD) for 3 months. But if you click on 'add USA', it jumps to $805. Double the price.
https://www.safetywing.com/faq.html?#how-much-does-it-cost

Another factor that people often overlook is who pays? By that I mean, who pays at the time that you receive medical treatment? Some insurers require you to pay and then make a claim on your return home. You might imagine that having to pay up front say $25k and then claim after returning home, would present a real problem to some people. But that's all part of other insurance coverage stories.

The bottom line here is that if someone thinks of 'long term travel' to a country other than the USA, as opposed to 'snowbirding' in Florida, they can find very different answers in terms of insurance costs and that is why I suggested that for some people, they may want to think about a winter in somewhere like Portugal or Spain, etc. rather than the USA.

If someone can get insurance for a $1000 per couple vs. $2000 per couple for 3 months, that $1000 difference can pay for one of them flying to Portugal and back and give them a winter in a whole new culture to explore. Let's be honest, Florida is just basically Ontario without the snow. It's not exactly expanding your cultural horizons.

So, I'm just saying, it may be worth some people looking a little farther for a winter destination or even just a little farther for an insurance provider.
 

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When we needed extended coverage we took the effort to look farther for insurance coverage. It paid off in terms of price, flexibility, and coverage. We had not even heard of some of the companies that people suggested we try.

One thing for certain, our experience was that the RBC's, the CAA's etc appeared easy to buy but their coverage was not great, their policy costs high, and they were not in the least bit flexible. We have 2 months of out of country coverage. We wanted insurance that started in month 3, that could be extended if our trip was of a longer duration that we anticipated, and had a deductable option that reduced the premium. In the process we noticed so many differences in coverage levels and questions.
 

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If someone can get insurance for a $1000 per couple vs. $2000 per couple for 3 months, that $1000 difference can pay for one of them flying to Portugal and back and give them a winter in a whole new culture to explore.
No desire to fly anywhere these days BTDT. Several friends have been to Portugal. Winter weather not exactly balmy - more like Carolinas (where we go) than Florida. Good for golf, but golf costs are double or more than those that we pay. That and other higher costs in Europe would no doubt wipe out any insurance savings.

Back to subject - We would be interested in any reputable insurer that would offer better than the $2000 we will pay for a couple in late 70s for 3 months in USA with $2-5Million coverage per person. That $2000 is top up for our Ontario OHIP - presumably US and offshore plans are not. The US ones I looked at were ~$1600 for $50,000 coverage for 3 months!
 

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The challenge with non US warm winter destinations for us is finding a beach destination, among other things. And that typically involves longer air travel. For us it is either Mexico, Costa Rica/Panama or Thailand. We love Thailand, and other SE Asia/OZ destinations but after four years air is getting to be a drag. It is anywhere from 18-24 hours.

Mexico and Costa Rica are typically 5-6 for us which is a snap for us. So this is what it may be future. Won't be the US. Won't be Europe. We can fly direct to Mexico. Not so for Florida (we know DFW, SLC,, etc all too well) so Mexico is a big draw for us at the moment. So much so that we can see ourselves eventually buying something. Our wants are direct air and lots of competition on the flights...plus of course the right place at the right price.
 

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The challenge with non US warm winter destinations for us is finding a beach destination, among other things. And that typically involves longer air travel. For us it is either Mexico, Costa Rica/Panama or Thailand. We love Thailand, and other SE Asia/OZ destinations but after four years air is getting to be a drag. It is anywhere from 18-24 hours.

Mexico and Costa Rica are typically 5-6 for us which is a snap for us. So this is what it may be future. Won't be the US. Won't be Europe. We can fly direct to Mexico. Not so for Florida (we know DFW, SLC,, etc all too well) so Mexico is a big draw for us at the moment. So much so that we can see ourselves eventually buying something. Our wants are direct air and lots of competition on the flights...plus of course the right place at the right price.
For a bit more 'off the beaten path' choice ian have a look at the Cape Verde Islands. They are not still in the 'undeveloped' stage but are still in the 'early development' stage. It shouldn't take 18-24 hours to get there. More like 12 hours with one stop in Portugal most likely.

I used to like Mexico and still do like the culture and food but as a destination, it is now just too saturated with tourists pretty much everywhere I would say. When I first visited Cancun for example, it was still a fishing village with no hotels. When I first visited Akumal, there was one hotel with no tv or telephones and none of the staff spoke English. It's pretty hard to find such places now. The one place I would suggest looking at is Isla Holbox if you haven't heard of it.

Here is a video on it by a young couple: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ANSyaR8yJ8
 

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Copied from the last time we had this thread a few months ago

World Nomads is highly praised by worldwide travelers but they also have short/destination policies. Most travel insurance have a long list of activities, sports and adventures that will null and void any coverage. World Nomads list

Ripcord Rescue and Global Rescue are praised by extreme travelers doing crazy things not necessarily even approved by World Nomads in locations not usually covered. They can send ex-special forces teams worldwide to save your sorry ***

Medjet I've heard nothing but bad things. The normal ones I wouldn't touch.. completely useless.. they will void anything besides sitting on a beach sober at an all-inclusive resort with all you can drink alcohol
 
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