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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So just a day back from three days in Buffalo. First trip away from home in three years.

We like to shop used book stores and thrift stores on holiday jaunts, and this time was no different.
Spent about $100 on about 15 titles including one new book on a book club reading list.

Ended up in 7 different thrift shops over the course of our trip.
I came home with a pair of casual wear shorts, and two pair of blue jeans. Things my existing wardrobe was either out if, in the case of the shorts, to too ratty as was the case of the existing jeans. These three pants cost me $20US.

Yes, not free, but the stores I bought them in had them sorted by size, and secured to hangers to make sorting them easy.

Wife came back with swim tops, t shirts, casual wear, etc.

Now that I think about it , most of my casual wear wardrobe has come from thrift stores. And with the days of dress shirt and tie waning at my office I guess thats where the work day clothes have come from as well.
 

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^ Nothing wrong with thrift-shop shopping but clothing(s) including footwears (other than generational hands-me down) that has been previously worn by someone else unknown, no matter how cleaned, sterilized, etc. is off my list.
 

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That sounds like reasonable pricing.
I find with any shopping, including thrift stores, outlets, liquidators, etc, one has to have pricing awareness and consider the value of the item. I recently read an article about some crazy pricing at Value Village.

 

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I buy lots of stuff at thrift shops, but I prefer Goodwill or Salvation Army.

DVDs.....dishes.....paintings.....Christmas decor......and always on the lookout for some vintage sports cards that can often be found tucked into unusual places.

A buddy of mine found a first issue of Sports Illustrated in a box of magazines he bought at Goodwill for a few dollars. Not only is it the first issue of SI in 1954, but inside the magazine there are 3 sheets of 1954 baseball cards.

They are worth some big dollars.

 

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Our daughter routinely buys higher end clothes for her young family from children's resale stores. She buys better quality so that they can be passed around between her children.
 

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I'm an avid thrifter, but mainly for collectibles, books, housewares, tools, and vintage stuff.

As for clothes, it seems like everyone else snatches up the ones that fit. I've definitely gotten some great deals on boots, though.

My friends and I are always ragging on Value Village for their prices. We like to play a game... text a picture of the item and make each other guess how expensive it is. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It is like a treasure hunt.
Wife came back with 10 Barbie dolls. 9 from thrifts. Total was about $50US. Two have beautifully crocheted dresses. A couple are 70's era dolls. That brings her total to about 160 Barbie dolls. I can see me building more shelves soon. The 9 at the thrift were culled down from about 20 she had in the cart at one time.
 

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^ Nah ... what's Covid, what's a pandemic??? And now what's monkeypox? Sounds like a big wrench where you can hit someone over the head with when you don't have a handgun or rifle on hand. Remember the USA Constitutional Amendments are greater than life itself.
 

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We have one in a basement on Marine Drive in West Van. Usually lightly used clothes from People's estates. CDs and Stereos galore. Lots of boots and shoes. Tea Sets...
 

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My wife has been an avid Value Village/Salvation Army shopper for years. She resented the policy shift to get rid of dressing rooms during Covid, but she understood it when the virus was spreading rapidly and there were outbreaks all over the place. But things have died down considerably and yet the stores haven't reopened dressing rooms and have maintained the exchange only/no refunds approach. It's obviously more lucrative for the retailer.
 

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I've lived in apartment buildings and second hand items that residents leave for each other are amazing. Sometimes free, sometimes for a few $.

Over the years I've scored a full patio set for only $20
Recently found a beautiful metal kettle to boil water
A nice Ikea chair that I still use (maybe paid $1)
And various kitchenware items. Easy enough to sanitize with lysol, boiling water.

I've also given away/sold items when moving, like Ikea tables in nearly perfect condition for $10 or $20, free lamps, etc.
 

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I wonder if the used market for goods is in any way factored into inflation calculations? This is an important avenue for products and survival for the poorest and youngest (students) people, as well as middle class thriftiness and lifestyle improvement for those who are sensible about such purchases.

Lots of reports of the big chain thrift store prices skyrocketting in the last 10 years. Clothing from $2 to 10 for some plain pair of pants. $5 for random Corelle items instead of $1 or $2. Trendy rich youth who are exploding the popularity of thrifting are supposedly the culprit. Might be a small factor - but say it's probably mostly the consolidation of corporations and aggressive profit seeking from Big Thrift management to blame...

Concurrently - Garage sales are dwindling away, another important avenue for access to items for the poor, due to most people discovering they can sell online.

Online reselling on Facebook (kijiji is a dinosaur now, if you haven't noticed) has also gone insane, partly due to the Covid shortages. Larger and "better" home items for resale, the kind you won't find in a thrift shop like newer electronics, yard equipment, decent furniture, etc., the things for a regular middle-class homeowner's existence, are just outrageously priced and still being snapped up everywhere instantly. People are often getting 60-70% of retail prices for products in used condition, instead of 30-40% as it used to be.
 

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I wonder if the used market for goods is in any way factored into inflation calculations? This is an important avenue for products and survival for the poorest and youngest (students) people, as well as middle class thriftiness and lifestyle improvement for those who are sensible about such purchases.

Lots of reports of the big chain thrift store prices skyrocketting in the last 10 years. Clothing from $2 to 10 for some plain pair of pants. $5 for random Corelle items instead of $1 or $2. Trendy rich youth who are exploding the popularity of thrifting are supposedly the culprit. Might be a small factor - but say it's probably mostly the consolidation of corporations and aggressive profit seeking from Big Thrift management to blame...

Concurrently - Garage sales are dwindling away, another important avenue for access to items for the poor, due to most people discovering they can sell online.

Online reselling on Facebook (kijiji is a dinosaur now, if you haven't noticed) has also gone insane, partly due to the Covid shortages. Larger and "better" home items for resale, the kind you won't find in a thrift shop like newer electronics, yard equipment, decent furniture, etc., the things for a regular middle-class homeowner's existence, are just outrageously priced and still being snapped up everywhere instantly. People are often getting 60-70% of retail prices for products in used condition, instead of 30-40% as it used to be.
These are good points and questions you raise, peterk. I don't have the answers. On the one hand, I'm happy that people have avenues to hawk their own possessions online rather than to turn them over to Value Village for free. What a corporate model! Take mountains of donated stuff, make a profit from it and be sure you advertise that your business donates to charity. Anyone here aware of how much Value Village actually gives to local causes? I'd really know to know what percentage of their bottom line goes to charity.

On the other hand, I hope people don't reduce donations to those in need because they can flog their belongings via the web for a decent buck.
 

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Last year, we bought a walnut wood hutch and buffet.....4 glass doors, 3 glass shelves, interior lights, 9 drawers, in excellent condition for $200 delivered and placed in the dining room.

The guy said it was his grandmothers and he had no room for it. I looked at new sets that looked the same......and they were priced at $6,000.
 

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Last year, we bought a walnut wood hutch and buffet.....4 glass doors, 3 glass shelves, interior lights, 9 drawers, in excellent condition for $200 delivered and placed in the dining room.

The guy said it was his grandmothers and he had no room for it. I looked at new sets that looked the same......and they were priced at $6,000.
Interior decorating trends change so quickly that most furniture is essentially worthless after 10-15 years. People just want to get rid of it.

Antiques or high end furniture by well known designers would be an exception to the rule.

New furniture is ridiculously expensive because people will pay to get the exact "look" they want to compliment their other decor. You could luck onto finding the right piece used, but it could also take way more time and effort than most people want to expend.
 
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