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There are quite a few e-bikes in the Okanagan and part of that may be a function of topography. E-bikes permit more people to enjoy bikes in their neighbourhoods and bike paths than would do otherwise. I have rented one and enjoyed it for longer distances, using the different power assist settings depending on topography. They are indeed heavy bikes and one is not likely to use zero power assist on anything but flat ground. I think they have a niche place in the market with the major downside being as LTR mentioned. Many folk travel too fast on them, lose control and end up in ER.
From my extensive observation over the years while riding my bicycle (about 3500km/yr) I would say that they shouldn't be allowed on city paths because they're far too fast, and they shouldn't be allowed on city streets because they're far too slow, so there's simply no situation where they can comfortably exist and not be dangerous.

ltr
Don't know what the accidental or death rates are involving e-bikes. But ownership/ridership can be reduced by simplying introducing requirements for licensing and insurance on e-bikes.
... the "city" of Toronto is "full" of e-bikes where the riders "weave" onto side-walks, parked any/everywhere that fits because its riders are trying to make as "many" and "as fast as possible" Uber/DoorDash/SkiptheDishes/Foods-deliveries.

I forgot to mention I was almost runned over by one on "the side-walk", never mind about the numerous times cut-off the lights' intersection. The back of these bikes usually have a big storage unit or a gigantic tote carried by the rider (which I presumed is for foods).

I won't mention also that the rider had no helmet on, much like plenty of other non-ebikers but then if they want to fight with other motorists on the street, I can't stop them. Just don't kill/maim the pedestrians with legs (ie. not on scooters either) on the side-walks.
 

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The problem is that of proper etiquette and courtesy, not the e-bike itself. Perhaps there should be some kind of licensing system whereby folks have to take a one day course to get an 'e-bike' card with the penalty for breaking rules being confiscation of the e-bike for a period of time. We will see more and more of these over time just like Vespas in Asia and regular bikes in The Netherlands. A set of proper rules would be much better.

E-bikes certainly have not been a problem in the Okanagan best I can tell from my experience of being both a pedestrian and a motorist. Most of them are used on bike paths and trails to begin with the best I can tell, though I do see some street use and multii-use bike/walking path use. I won't be getting one any time soon. I will rent when I want to do more extended rides.
 

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The problem is that of proper etiquette and courtesy, not the e-bike itself. Perhaps there should be some kind of licensing system whereby folks have to take a one day course to get an 'e-bike' card with the penalty for breaking rules being confiscation of the e-bike for a period of time. We will see more and more of these over time just like Vespas in Asia and regular bikes in The Netherlands. A set of proper rules would be much better.

E-bikes certainly have not been a problem in the Okanagan best I can tell from my experience of being both a pedestrian and a motorist. Most of them are used on bike paths and trails to begin with the best I can tell, though I do see some street use and multii-use bike/walking path use. I won't be getting one any time soon. I will rent when I want to do more extended rides.
From what I can tell bicycle riders from the Netherlands think they have right of way and traffic laws don't apply to them.

pretty much the same problem as the bad ebikers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
A set of proper rules would be much better.
From what I read, ebikes are limited to 32 km/h here (25 km/h in EU) so that's a good start. I see very few ebikes here in MB so can't comment on them being bad.

From what I can tell bicycle riders from the Netherlands think they have right of way and traffic laws don't apply to them.

pretty much the same problem as the bad ebikers.
Pretty much the same everywhere, pedal or ebike. Some break the rules, some show little road manners or none at all.
 

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Dutch bike riders do have the ROW on designated bike lanes of which there are many. I spent inordinate amounts of time (about 1 week/month) on project work in Amsterdam and Den Haag over about 3.5 years back before my retirement. It mostly works as it should in the pecking order. We need the same sort of interaction to start occurring here.
 

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I am looking at different mobility options preferrably that don't involve licensing or insurance.

Regardless of what I choose, I won't be riding it on the roads.

It is just too dangerous to be on roads where everyone has to pass you by.....cars, SUVs, buses, trucks......no thanks.

I will ride it on the sidewalk and worse case scenario pay the bylaw fine, if I get caught.
 

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I wonder if private e-bikes will eventually have the same limitations as shared scooters. In Calgary, scooters are software limited based on GPS reading to a lower top speed in busy areas.
 

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I wonder if private e-bikes will eventually have the same limitations as shared scooters. In Calgary, scooters are software limited based on GPS reading to a lower top speed in busy areas.
Shared scooters are presumably tracked by GPS so the owner doesn't have them stolen.

Requiring private owners of e-bikes to share GPS information would likely be a non-starter for privacy reasons.
 

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I wonder if private e-bikes will eventually have the same limitations as shared scooters. In Calgary, scooters are software limited based on GPS reading to a lower top speed in busy areas.
Why would they have to share GPS info?
Perhaps I don't understand how this would work. How would you limit speed in busy areas without a GPS connection?

And if the answer is that only the software on the bike knows the GPS location, how do you convince owners that the bike GPS data isn't shareable via the satellite connection?
 

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Regardless of what I choose, I won't be riding it on the roads.

It is just too dangerous to be on roads where everyone has to pass you by.....cars, SUVs, buses, trucks......no thanks.

I will ride it on the sidewalk and worse case scenario pay the bylaw fine, if I get caught.
Drivers often do not notice cyclists on sidewalks, and do not expect them to be travelling as fast as cyclists do. Consider every driveway as an intersection. Drivers backing out of a driveway don't expect anyone to be moving as fast as a bike. It's much easier to see a slow moving pedestrian and stop for them than to stop in time for a bike on the sidewalk. Drivers turning right or left also often cut off cyclists riding on crosswalks, because they do not perceive their speed. Drivers expect pedestrian speed on sidewalks and crosswalks, not typical bicycle speeds.

The municipality I live in has published statistics that say 68% of bicycle collisions occur when cyclists are riding on sidewalks.
 

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I am looking at different mobility options preferrably that don't involve licensing or insurance.

Regardless of what I choose, I won't be riding it on the roads.

It is just too dangerous to be on roads where everyone has to pass you by.....cars, SUVs, buses, trucks......no thanks.

I will ride it on the sidewalk and worse case scenario pay the bylaw fine, if I get caught.
... then it's a scooter (with limited speed too) for you. E-bikes are supposedly to be ridden on the road/street in the suburbs just as there're "bike"-lanes in metro/downtown for that purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I guess it's all in the timing, saw two ebikes on the bike path on my ride this afternoon. Seems to be a hit with those that commute to and from work based on their backpacks and clothes worn.

I also noticed Costco sells some moderately priced (~$1700) mtn ebikes, just not sure how good they are. Also talked to my friend who owns a bike shop .... ya, not getting a new bike anytime soon due to the shortage.
 

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Good part about Costco is if they suck (most likely at that price) you can return them. For a decent eBike with reasonable components expect to pay 6-7k.
 

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Avid cyclist for many years - road and mountain bikes. I've been highly considering a DIY e-bike kit. I still enjoy riding but I'm very busy with other active stuff and can't afford to be exhausted after doing a 40-60km ride. An e-bike will help spare some energy while still allowing me to explore new routes.

No real issues in my region. It is becoming increasingly more popular.
 
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