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Discussion Starter #1
Although the announcement isn't official yet, are you going to buy a tablet? Is there a make or break price point at which you'd be a buyer?

I think I'll be buying it as long as it comes in around $750 or less.


Let's hope there's not the same Kindle related limitations and delays in getting the product into Canada
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If they're cheap enough I'll buy a few!

I'm not a shareholder but should be, I'm just an iPhone, macBook user at the moment. The macbook is on its last legs though so it's time to get something new. Apple is really making progress in the retail/home market.
 

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Let's hope there's not the same Kindle related limitations and delays in getting the product into Canada
I think you can pretty much guarantee that there will be delays and limitations in getting it into Canada. I wouldn't be surprised if we have to wait a couple of years, but I'd love to be wrong about that.

Until a few days ago I was skeptical that Apple would actually announce a tablet and was figuring everyone was wrong, that it would be something else. But there have been enough leaks that it's clear that it's got be a tablet-like device.

I would probably buy one, though I might wait for the second generation so they can get the hardware kinks out first. Apple's quality control is famously erratic, and while I've been using Macs since they first came out in the 1980s I've only had one (my current MacBook Pro) that didn't either come with significant hardware problems out of the box or develop them within the first year or two.

There are two things that have convinced me that I want to read books electronically: 1) computer books and other books that go out of date almost as soon as you buy them, which seems like such a waste of paper and space on my bookshelf, 2) The Collected Stories of Mavis Gallant, which I'm reading right now: at something like 800 pages, it's just too heavy to read comfortably in bed. ;-)

Obviously this will be a lot more than a book reader, and that's appealing too, mainly for travel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Very much agree about the travel aspect Brad. We're travelling south for 3 weeks this spring and I've been debating whether a netbook or tablet would be the best way to go. If the tablet is able to have a pluggable keyboard for extending periods of typing I think it's an easy sell. But often times Apple sacrifices some usability aspects in favour of simplicity of design. This is ok for somethings, like the absence of a "stop" button on the iPod. But also limiting only having one mouse button. 30 years later they caught on somewhat with the magic mouse.
 

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But also limiting only having one mouse button. 30 years later they caught on somewhat with the magic mouse.
Well, sort of. Two-button mice have always worked with the Mac (I remember using a two-button mouse on my Macs in the early 1990s), and contextual menus just like those with Windows have always been available with a CTRL-click if you were only using a one-button mouse. I've always felt this "limitation" of the Mac was exaggerated.

I agree that a pluggable keyboard would be a great option for this device. We'll know soon enough!
 

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My husband will KILL me if I bug him now. Actually this morning I could not send my email and he warned me then that HE IS WATCHING MAC WORLD TODAY!!!!!

I have the new magic mouse or whatever and there are no buttons on it and it works great at least i wont have to rub it on paper every other day.

He has Mac World running on our TV upstairs.

Sigh .... boys and their toys :rolleyes:

I will not like it but I am afraid I am doomed to buy the iTablet or any other new Mac gadget. The conversations surrounding this subject will sound like this...

Can I have it Now?
Can I have it Now?
Can I have it Now?

Uhmm it's so expensive and small. You really don't get good weight to cost ratio. I like rice better. I can buy a 20lb bag of rice for $30... now that's impressive. The igadget costs a zillion dollars and it weighs 3 oz. How is that good value? What are they making the igadget out of anyways angel wings and gold crystals?

Can I have it Now?
Can I have it Now?
Can I have it Now?

Ok but only if you quit bugging me.... uhmm can I borrow it ;)
 

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The big disappointment is that, yes it has 3G but it's not like Amazon's "free" 3G on the Kindle: if you want to use 3G you have to pay for it through AT&T in the States, which means Rogers here in Canada, which means you're going to have to fork over a boatload of money every month if you want to use that.

On the other hand you can just stick with WiFi; that works fine as long as you've got hotspots.

Other than that, this thing looks awesome and could even replace my Mac if it had more disk space (64 gigs is the largest capacity).

My bet is that the eBooks will only be available in the States for a while (months and possibly years); I'd be surprised if they could negotiate a Canadian deal by now. But like I said, I hope I'm wrong!
 

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For me, it is incredible to watch how much buzz Apple creates around its new products. They literally spend nothing on marketing except "Can't talk about it" and the media goes to work for them speculating and debating about what Apple is up to. Other companies can only dream about this kind of publicity, something no amount of money can buy...
 

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Prices in US dollars:

- 64 GB with 3G: $829. That’s the most expensive. That’s it.

- WiFi only: $499 (16 GB), $599 (32 GB), $699 (64 GB)

- Wifi and 3G: $629, $729, $82

And yes, it comes with a keyboard doc. That makes it even more interesting. They say the international 3G access will come in June; I didn't see anything about eBook availability outside the United States.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No contracts for 3G Access with AT&T and unlimited data plan available. There's no way either of those things will be true with Rogers. It's not in their nature to provide value to their customers.

I'm fine with the wifi access. Any critical internet could be access via iphone if not near an internet connection (but that's not very often). Keyboard doc is key.

Big question: Are they allowing Adobe in? ie: Can I read PDFs and Flash now? This could be a deal breaker.
 

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Big question: Are they allowing Adobe in? ie: Can I read PDFs and Flash now? This could be a deal breaker.
They don't need Adobe for reading PDFs: you can do that in Preview on the Mac, and I wouldn't be surprised if they've modified Pages or one of the other apps to handle it if no Adobe product is available. Flash might be a different story.

I don't know what's going on between Adobe and Apple lately -- Adobe's CS4 applications seem to be a disaster on the Mac platform; I have Fireworks and it (and apparently most other CS4 apps) crashes every time I try to exit.
 

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I may eat my words later, but I can't see the iPad being nearly as "revolutionary" as the iPhone was. I'd consider it "minorly evolutionary" in certain ways, and a step backward in others.

In my view, the physical dimensions of the iPad put it squarely in-line to compete with PC-based netbook offerings. The iPad has the advantage of a certain degree of "sexiness" and (if anything like the iPod Touch or iPhone) a great user interface. But it undoubtedly comes with the disadvantage of flexibility in terms of running apps. (e.g., can it run PC apps, or can I install Linux? Almost certainly neither, whereas I could do that with a netbook.) There is also the question of DRM associated with the book and/or music offerings, and the fact that many of us have sunk a small fortune in Intel-based PC software which could never run on a platform like this.

If anything, I look forward to seeing what Asus and Samsung do to their netbook line-up within the next 2-3 years in response to this device. Apple's competition will almost certainly force these other computer manufacturers to improve the usability of their products and lower their price-points. In turn, everyone will win.


~~~~~
A few other things that get me about the iPad, the more I read about it:

- it has no DVI output (only VGA), which makes it somewhat less useful for giving presentations at conferences
- it has no USB connector (so you can't, for example, connect your digital camera and upload pictures)
- it can't play Flash (though, while not terrible, it's pretty annoying in certain circumstances)
- it basically runs the iphone OS (not OS X)

... so... I don't see this replacing netbooks any time soon.
 

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recently i've undergone baptism-by-fire in the electronic waste disposal industry, and i've learned a few astonishing facts. Including. There's no e-waste disposal system on this planet that operates both ecologically and profitably. That's why your municipality has to pay to get the stuff hauled away.

if governments pass laws that e-waste must be returned to manufacturers for eco-disposal, the same cycle will recur. The only difference will be that the recyclers will collect e-waste from manufacturers instead of from municipalities.

most enviro e-waste processors in both north america and europe are storing toxic and therefore unrecyclable plastic pellets in the faint hope that some day they will be able to find a buyer. However the probability is high that, as their warehouses run out of space, they will eventually have to bury this unsellable waste in landfill sites.

it's the flame-retardant chemical in tv and computer casings as well as in phone shells that cannot be extracted. So even when crushed & pelletized, the toxic properties keep these pellets out of the recycling stream.

apparently it's easier to harvest metals and minerals from e-waste. Motherboards are the most profitable crop.

for anybody, or any municipality, that wants to go green, the cardinal rule is Do not dispose of the old. Meaning, a lot of times, don't buy the new.
 

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But it undoubtedly comes with the disadvantage of flexibility in terms of running apps. (e.g., can it run PC apps, or can I install Linux? Almost certainly neither, whereas I could do that with a netbook.)
I agree that this isn't a revolutionary product, it's really just a logical next step after the iPhone/iPod Touch. But while it could compete with netbooks to some extent, I don't think it's intended for that; it's appealing to a whole different user group. The kind of people who want to run PC apps or Linux are not the kind of people who would want to use a device like this. This is primarily a lifestyle accessory. And there's a huge base of people who already know how to use it and don't need any instructions: the millions of people who have an iPhone or an iPod Touch.

On the other hand, it's clear that you can do serious work on it too; the iWork suite for the iPad costs just $10, which is practically like getting Microsoft Office for $10. I use the iWork suite on my Mac and it's remarkably feature-rich and intuitive, and almost entirely compatible with MS Office files.

One of the things that Apple understands is context: Most companies make products and software as if it's the only thing you own and you have all the time in the world to learn how to use it. Apple understands that most of us have, if we're lucky, 30 minutes a week available to learn how to use something, and 99% of people don't read instruction manuals. One reason the iPhone is so successful is that you don't have to read a manual to be able to figure out how to use it (although if you do read the manual you'll discover a lot of features that can come in handy), and you can figure out how to use it on the fly.
 

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Well i think that where the innovations are occurring is not just in the use of the huge touch screen but in programming applications that run on this new gadget.

I have the iPhone which I use primarily for business to be in touch with my office when I am not there to man my office. I even have a few games on it so i can waste time while i am waiting if necessary.

For those of you unfamiliar with the Ebook industry there are currently a few different reader types that use different formats for their books which are not compatible with other devices. I'm hoping that Apple does for the publishing consumer what he did for the music consumer offer many many books online for a reasonable price. Currently many books are not available or out of print. MAybe we can get some of those into the virtual world so people can read them.

So it will be very interesting to see what uses we will find for this new device. I have found many uses for my iphone including using it to play cookie monster videos for my 2 year old in the checkout lane of the grocery store it's not usually what you do with a phone. I am also pretty impressed with this new touch screen technology being in common use. Whe knows where this will lead.

As far as Apple's ease of use and stability I am a fan. I worked in an office that ran Macs that were all networked as our office computers. The youngest computer there was 13 years old and the whole system was very stable and worked. If you were running 13 year old pc's in a network it just wouldn't work. Plus no viruses. I have found the same durability and functionality in other Apple products.

Oh and my 2 year old, he knows how to use the iphone too ;) he knows how to find his videos and play music and how to delete my contacts. The iPhone also makes a great baseball. Uhmmm ok not so much but seriously it's that easy to use.
 
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