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Model S is USD$85k - 120k. Lucid Air is launching at $170k, which is Taycan territory.
You want to look again, you didn't even look at the link I provided. This type of misinformation isn't useful and really ruins your credibility, meaning we can't take your posts regarding Tesla seriously.

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Edit: Now if your issue is that it isn't available at launch, that's a different point altogether. If you recall, Tesla started off with their high-end models first, and was praised for that.
 

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Oh Oh lol

...and (b) the President of the battery company was indicted months earlier over allegations that he conned NASA by using his expense account to procure numerous prostitutes.



 

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You want to look again, you didn't even look at the link I provided. This type of misinformation isn't useful and really ruins your credibility, meaning we can't take your posts regarding Tesla seriously.

View attachment 20617

Edit: Now if your issue is that it isn't available at launch, that's a different point altogether. If you recall, Tesla started off with their high-end models first, and was praised for that.
Who knows what the pricing for Model S will be in three or four years when Lucid gets around (if ever) to the base model. I imagine Model S will be refreshed in that time (Musk has also mulled discontinuing, as it isn't a profit driver) which could incorporate manufacturing improvements that would lower the cost further.

I'm not faulting Lucid for the launch price. I'm just saying it is not directly competitive with Model S and is not going to be a 'Tesla killer', which is the media narrative.
 

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Who knows what the pricing for Model S will be in three or four years when Lucid gets around (if ever) to the base model. I imagine Model S will be refreshed in that time (Musk has also mulled discontinuing, as it isn't a profit driver) which could incorporate manufacturing improvements that would lower the cost further.
The base model is aimed for 2022, so not 3 or 4 years. Musk has already been on record that the Model S won't be refreshed, but nothing about discontinuing. Elon Musk Says No To Refreshing The Tesla Model S And Model X - Is This A Big Mistake? @ Top Speed

Considering that the models are are pretty much the same chassis, there wouldn't be much difference in design. It's no different than all the different Model S versions.

As for directly competitive, I'd say the base model has similar specifications, as well as a more luxurious interior which is easier for a slight price premium.
 

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A bit too much rhetoric in both directions. We know Andrew is a Tesla cheerleader of great passion so his comments need to be taken in context. It will be good to have Lucid as a competitor whenever it appears. There is eventually room for many in this space so let's cheer on the entrants. I will stand on the sidelines for a long time as we no longer drive enough to justify the EV premium to begin with.... strictly on a value basis. Time will tell.
 

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The Ford Mach E is targetting a 300 mile (500km) range, and is starting in the low $40k US range.
Chevy bolt has similar range and lower pricing.

Tesla has a lot of competition in both their self driving tech, and the EV Tech.

I don't understand the sky-high valuation.
 

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In all fairness, a Chevy Bolt is not remotely a Tesla of any kind but your point about valuation is spot on. Investors have gotten drunk on euphoria.... We will just have to watch this play out.

P.S. I was relieved Tesla never made the S&P500 this round. That would have really put a dampener on S&P500 valuations, albeit I accept it is part of VTI.
 

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A bit too much rhetoric in both directions. We know Andrew is a Tesla cheerleader of great passion so his comments need to be taken in context. It will be good to have Lucid as a competitor whenever it appears. There is eventually room for many in this space so let's cheer on the entrants. I will stand on the sidelines for a long time as we no longer drive enough to justify the EV premium to begin with.... strictly on a value basis. Time will tell.
All I know is that it won't have a material impact on Tesla's financials. Model S is not a very important product to Tesla's business. And if the market for premium EVs is growing, it's okay if Tesla's share shrinks--they basically ate Merc, Audi and BMWs lunch.
 

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In all fairness, a Chevy Bolt is not remotely a Tesla of any kind but your point about valuation is spot on. Investors have gotten drunk on euphoria.... We will just have to watch this play out.

P.S. I was relieved Tesla never made the S&P500 this round. That would have really put a dampener on S&P500 valuations, albeit I accept it is part of VTI.
They're competitors in price and range.
The Chevy Bolt has a insignificantly longer range than the standard range Model 3, at a lower price.
 

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Driving a Bolt vs a Model 3 is like having KD as sustenance vs dining at Winston's in TO. Not that I am a fan of Tesla vehicles at all. A family member has a Model S
 

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They're competitors in price and range.
The Chevy Bolt has a insignificantly longer range than the standard range Model 3, at a lower price.
I think you'll find that less important than the experience when you come to charge it. There's a reason Model 3 is outselling Bolt 5 to 1.
 

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Driving a Bolt vs a Model 3 is like having KD as sustenance vs dining at Winston's in TO. Not that I am a fan of Tesla vehicles at all. A family member has a Model S
I wouldn't know, never drove an electric car, they don't fit my use case, though most likely my 2023 purchase will be electric.
 

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P.S. I was relieved Tesla never made the S&P500 this round. That would have really put a dampener on S&P500 valuations, albeit I accept it is part of VTI.
It's also a demonstration of how indexes are actually actively managed, contrary to popular belief. For the S&P (both S&P 500 and TSX Composite) there is a committee which makes decisions, so there's human discretion involved.

We can all probably agree that Mawer have proven themselves to be good portfolio managers. Well over the last few years, I also realized that the S&P 500 committee have proven themselves to be good portfolio managers.

 

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I don't worry about that much. "Actve" is semantics in broad based indices, akin to looking for moss in a forest.
 

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I wouldn't know, never drove an electric car, they don't fit my use case, though most likely my 2023 purchase will be electric.
I drove my friends Tesla model S...fit & finish a bit less than a Toyota and not in Mercedes league but has lots of get up & go. Handles very good but driver sits very low...of course I drive a Wrangler so take my opinion fwiw.
 

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FWIW, EVs have lots of torque (for acceleration) across the rpm curve which is the nature of electric motors anyway. But they also seem to stress the batteries under heavy load for sustained lengths of time. For example, our family member's Model S really is diminished coming up the Coquihalla from Hope to the summit. He has to re-charge in Merritt or on the Okanagan Connector to make it over the Pennask summit and into the valley. I call it just not being ready for prime time.....yet.
 

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It just takes a lot of energy to drive up a mountain. Your fuel economy in a ICE vehicle is also terrible. EVs do much better going down mountains--they don't overheat their brakes.

If there is a charging station en route, is it really a disaster? I could see the point if your daily commute included massive elevation changes. But for occasional trips? Meh...
 

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It's also a demonstration of how indexes are actually actively managed, contrary to popular belief. For the S&P (both S&P 500 and TSX Composite) there is a committee which makes decisions, so there's human discretion involved.

We can all probably agree that Mawer have proven themselves to be good portfolio managers. Well over the last few years, I also realized that the S&P 500 committee have proven themselves to be good portfolio managers.

Some indexes are actively managed, some are not.
The funds themselves are passively managed though.
 

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It just takes a lot of energy to drive up a mountain. Your fuel economy in a ICE vehicle is also terrible. EVs do much better going down mountains--they don't overheat their brakes.

If there is a charging station en route, is it really a disaster? I could see the point if your daily commute included massive elevation changes. But for occasional trips? Meh...
I know it takes more gas to climb a mountain but I still have 1/4-1/2 tank of gas left over for an Okanagan-Vancouver run. Why in the world would I want to stop somewhere for a 20-30 minute charge on a 380 km trip? I agree it is not relevant for commuter EVs, but some EVs will need considerably longer range for at least some uses. I will need to get similar range out of an EV to consider one for touring

EVs do have the benefit of regenerative braking on down slopes but that is assuming one needs to brake at all. Not usually the case on the Coq but I do get that it has plenty of application in many situations. We know you are an unwavering fan of EVs. I assume that is all you have in your driveway.
 
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