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this is such an awesome site . . very informative forum exchanges.
I am particularly interested in some books on early retirement, money management, personal finance, etc. I've come accross some titles such as Money Road (Gart Turner), Why Swim with the Sharks (Diana Salomaa) from forum exchanges and they have been very helpful. Would anyone have other book suggestions . . nothing too technical though. Thanks a lot everyone and great job with the exchange of information !
 

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one member who seems to keep a thoughtful eye on his library's best titles is Spidey. I don't remember his favourite picks, but if you can whiz thru Spidey's messages you'll probably pick up some good ideas.

another well-read personnage here is library aficionado Harold Crump.

alas i don't have any suggestions for you since i happen to believe the best finance info is splashed, leaked, painted, striped, hinted, tweeted & posted in random hits across the internet media. From time to time there are valuable nuggets right here on moneyforum. All this makes for a chaotic learning experience. And i for one would hesitate to put faith in garth turner.
 

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File this under "shameless self-promotion:" James Daw in the Toronto Star reviewed a copy of my forthcoming book, and I thought this was a nice review:

The musical score I would choose to accompany the new advice book Pensionize Your Nest Egg would surely be The 1812 Overture.

A canon would fire each time the authors attack a myth or popular misconception.

Business professor Moshe Milevsky and his business associate Alexandra Macqueen take aim at several fallacies while setting out their seven steps for getting by without a true pension plan.


http://www.thestar.com/article/845781--daw-do-you-really-have-a-pension
 

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Here, there and everywhere. Soon to be appearing in a bookstore near you! (In book form only. No actual appearance implied.)
 

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The preface, intro and Chapter 1 of Pensionize Your Nest Egg are up at Scribd.com:

Take a look!
Thanks, MG...starting to read and already interested/intrigued.
In Chapter 1, Nortel pension example is used.
Aren't pensions supposed to be held separately from the corporate finances?
How can a corp. going bust, bankrupt the pension plan too?
Doesn't the Pension Guarantee Board step in to protect those pensioners?

Sorry, just my ignorance/curiousity.
 

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The real question is, do corporations go bankrupt in order to avoid their pension obligations?!

As for background reading on the counterparty risk associated with pensions, there's lots out there; that isn't really a focus of the book. There's a ton of info on the situation of Nortel pensioners in particular.
 

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I'm obsessed with financial books lately, I'll definitely check these out. Other books I've read lately and mostly liked:

-"The Smart Canadian's Guide to Saving Money," by Pat Foran
-"The Smart Cookies' Guide to Making More Dough and Getting out of Debt," by Andrea Baxter, Angela Self, Katie Dunsworth, Robyn Gunn, and Sandra Hanna
-"The Wealthy Barber," by David Chilton
-"Smart Women Finish Rich," "Smart Couples Finish Rich," "The Automatic Millionaire," and a few others by David Bach -- make sure they're the Canadian editions. "Smart Women Finish Rich" was the first money management book I ever read and I found it really inspiring
-"Personal Finance for Canadians for Dummies," "Investing for Canadians for Dummies," and a few other Dummies books

Then there are books that aren't so much money management books as they are insights into human decision-making, which can affect our relationship with money (how we respond to incentives, how we assign value to thngs, etc.). I recently finished "Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behaviour" by Rom Brafman and Ori Brafman -- it's sort of in the vein of Malcolm Gladwell, Freakonomics, that kind of thing. Another great one is Margaret Atwood's "Payback: Debt and Shadow Side of Wealth."
 

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I'm obsessed with financial books lately, I'll definitely check these out. Other books I've read lately and mostly liked:

-"The Smart Canadian's Guide to Saving Money," by Pat Foran
-"The Smart Cookies' Guide to Making More Dough and Getting out of Debt," by Andrea Baxter, Angela Self, Katie Dunsworth, Robyn Gunn, and Sandra Hanna
-"The Wealthy Barber," by David Chilton
-"Smart Women Finish Rich," "Smart Couples Finish Rich," "The Automatic Millionaire," and a few others by David Bach -- make sure they're the Canadian editions. "Smart Women Finish Rich" was the first money management book I ever read and I found it really inspiring
-"Personal Finance for Canadians for Dummies," "Investing for Canadians for Dummies," and a few other Dummies books

Then there are books that aren't so much money management books as they are insights into human decision-making, which can affect our relationship with money (how we respond to incentives, how we assign value to thngs, etc.). I recently finished "Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behaviour" by Rom Brafman and Ori Brafman -- it's sort of in the vein of Malcolm Gladwell, Freakonomics, that kind of thing. Another great one is Margaret Atwood's "Payback: Debt and Shadow Side of Wealth."
Thanks Karen, reserved smart couples finish rich and automatic millionaire.
 

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reserved smart couples finish rich and automatic millionaire.
I haven't been too impressed with the David Bach books.
I even attended one of his free seminars organized by Scotiabank a few years ago when they were endorsing him a lot.
Most of those books were written for the general American financially un-savvy public.
I vaguely recall that in one of the books (maybe Start Late Finish Rich), he was recommending investing in rental properties and real estate as a means to catch up on savings/net-worth.
That book was probably written between 2005 - 2007.
Wonder how many readers took that advice :eek:

I don't think the type of audience we have on this forum will find much worth in those books.
You can spend your reading time better elsewhere.
 

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Now found at Toronto Public Library. Library has 55 copies with 34 on hold! I put one on hold :)
Re: Personalize your nest egg.

Finally got the book from the library. There was a problem with the delivery to my branch. It was in limbo for like 6 weeks until I reported that something must be wrong.

Anyway, they put me to the top of the list and I got the book yesterday. Library closed at 12 noon. Started reading it last night. Never thought of my RPP as a sheltered savings plan, but that's exactly what it is. I can see where this is going with annuities, but in the first two examples, less stress and financial comfort/guarantee is where the value is.

And I think retiring on $60,000/ year income in todays dollars is great. With no debt and paid off house, this sounds more than enough to live on. Hell I don't even think we take that much home now after taxes are paid. And we still manage to save, pay debt and invest.

I didn't hear any mention of leverage strategies yet, but I think they are worth considering helping you get wealthy when you are young and have time for risk. But problem is, they are more likely used by people more savvy with money.
 
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