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We worry a lot about gas mileage compared to other auto expenses like insurance, car payments and repairs. It is kind of funny seeing someone spending $30,000 on a new car and justifying it because it will save $5 a week compared to their old car. You have to about double your mileage to get a significant saving.

I must admit I am as much a slave to this as anyone even though I have done the math and know better.
 

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We worry a lot about gas mileage compared to other auto expenses like insurance, car payments and repairs. It is kind of funny seeing someone spending $30,000 on a new car and justifying it because it will save $5 a week compared to their old car. You have to about double your mileage to get a significant saving.

I must admit I am as much a slave to this as anyone even though I have done the math and know better.
That was my thoughts when looking at diesel VW options. The expense of the car for fuel saving just isn't worth it. Second hand prius etc I think will bite people in the butt once they start having to replace batteries.

Insurance rates are simply brutal :hopelessness:
 

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I haven't really considered gas mileage as a primary factor when choosing a vehicle. But one thing I ensure is that it uses regular gas and not premium.
I definitely consider gas mileage when purchasing a car. We put 50K plus a year on each of our vehicles so gas adds up. I agree that regular fuel is a good choice but the truth is that most cars that state they need premium fuel do just fine on regular. It's also reasonable to buy a car with standard size rims/tires because of the expense of high end tires.
 

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We worry a lot about gas mileage compared to other auto expenses like insurance, car payments and repairs. It is kind of funny seeing someone spending $30,000 on a new car and justifying it because it will save $5 a week compared to their old car. You have to about double your mileage to get a significant saving.

I must admit I am as much a slave to this as anyone even though I have done the math and know better.
Good point. A quick back of napkin calculation reveals that 30K would by me gas for about 25 years... LOL.

My 2000 Pontiac Sunfire gets about 8L/100 km, so assuming the new car averaged about 5L/100 km, that's only a 37.5% savings... gas would still cost me 18.75K over 25 years.

New car cost: $30,000 + Gas for 25 yrs @ $18,750 = $48,750

Old car cost: *$2,000 + Gas for 25 yrs @ $30,000 = $32,000

Note: I actually paid less for my car, but then I'm good at fixing things for cheap (my car is in better shape than most cars half its age).
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
From a total financial standpoint you do have to factor many things in. If you drive very little, mileage and longevity don't matter much, a cheap second hand car is probably a good bet. If however you're driving 20K or higher kms a year it might just pay off getting the more expensive diesel or hybrid offering, also providing you plan on keeping the car 10+ years.

If you are a high mileage driver, like uptoolate's 50k kms/year, those extra 3-4L/100km can really add up over the years.
 

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^ Yep, clearly my situation is atypical since I drive less than 15K a year (I probably drive more distance for pleasure than for my commute, which is negligible). I think a hybrid or VW TDI would probably be great for a 50K/yr driver... I heard that cab drivers really like hybrids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
^ Yep, clearly my situation is atypical since I drive less than 15K a year (I probably drive more distance for pleasure than for my commute, which is negligible). I think a hybrid or VW TDI would probably be great for a 50K/yr driver... I heard that cab drivers really like hybrids.
Also fixing your existing car is almost always the cheaper route than getting something new(er), especially so if you can DIY.
 

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No, but our preference is always for a smaller imports. We are getting 6.2L/100Km highway on our 16 year old V6 Camry and almost the same on the Honda V6. We won't consider a car that requires premium fuel. We have downsized everything in the past year and one car may go. Tires on both are speed rated but we always buy at Costco and the prices are reasonable.

We would like to get something that has even better mileage, especially in the city, but our cars are in good condition and are worth more to us than they are to the market. If we give one to my son, we will replace it with a Honda Fit for city driving.

My last two company vehicles were SUV's-6cly. full load Escapes. They both sucked gas at an unbelievable rate (to us).
 

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MPG alone is the dumbest reason to buy a car. give your head a shake and learn how to calculate TOTAL cost of ownership.....

Just wondering how many seriously consider the amount they will spend on fuel when getting a new/used car?

If you drive very few km's it probably won't matter much but even for the average 20k km's a year it can add up. I see many of my neighbors buy trucks/SUVs with no real need to do so. A difference of 4L/100 kms adds up to near $1000 a year and I think many small car vs truck comparisons will probably be in the 6-9L/100km range difference. So it seems this is one area many choose not to save money on.
 

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haha, it is lego. why would you not be able to DIY?

my five year old had a screwdriver ready to fix a cupboard the other day. there are no 'professionals'...
Also fixing your existing car is almost always the cheaper route than getting something new(er), especially so if you can DIY.
 

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"I agree that regular fuel is a good choice but the truth is that most cars that state they need premium fuel do just fine on regular."
Today's computer controlled engines will adjust themselves to run on low octane fuel without damage, but at a cost of reduced power and mileage. So if you save 10% by buying cheaper gas but get 10% less MPG what have you saved? Nothing. You might as well buy the gas the owner's manual calls for.

Incidentally if your engine calls for 87 octane there is nothing to be gained by buying premium. It will run just as well on the petunia juice, maybe better. Octane is a measure of knock resistance and is related mainly to the compression ratio. If you don't have a high compression engine you don't need high octane fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
MPG alone is the dumbest reason to buy a car. give your head a shake and learn how to calculate TOTAL cost of ownership.....
Well of course its not the *only* thing, who said it was? Obviously if you drive a fair number of kms fuel can be a significant cost factor.
BTW, care to share your "TOTAL cost of ownership" calculation?


Today's computer controlled engines will adjust themselves to run on low octane fuel without damage, but at a cost of reduced power and mileage. So if you save 10% by buying cheaper gas but get 10% less MPG what have you saved? Nothing.
True only *IF* you lose 10% on the mileage, which from what I've measured (one car only that can use regular but they recommend premium), you don't. I think as long as the car can adjust the timing accordingly the mileage doesn't appear to suffer any significant amount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Did an interesting fuel experiment in the past weeks as I needed to replace a part that required me to remove my serpentine belt until the part arrived. So without an alternator, power steering pump or A/C being driven for a little more than half the tank I gained almost 1L per 100kms. I was quite surpised that the load on these caused such a drain on fuel and of course the inconvenience of driving without the belt is far greater than the fuel savings. :)
 

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For sure cainvest!

In thinking about the question...I figure my next car will be one >50 mpg. I want something that sips gas. Likely look at KIA, Hyundai, Toyota or Honda for small econo-car.
 

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Well of course its not the *only* thing, who said it was? Obviously if you drive a fair number of kms fuel can be a significant cost factor.
BTW, care to share your "TOTAL cost of ownership" calculation?



True only *IF* you lose 10% on the mileage, which from what I've measured (one car only that can use regular but they recommend premium), you don't. I think as long as the car can adjust the timing accordingly the mileage doesn't appear to suffer any significant amount.

Agree totally Cainvest. I wondered about this myself and ran a comparison of premium to regular unleaded and didn't find a significant difference in terms of mileage. Big difference with either type of gas when I lightened up on my somewhat heavy foot and took a little extra time to drive to work. :)
 

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I drive over $50k per year, most of it highway driving. I test drove a Prius, and notwithstanding the fact that I hated how it drove and the visibility out the backside, it really isn't an improvement over a regular gas powered car for highway driving. I also considered diesel cars such as VW. However, I found that the up front purchase price was generally around $10,000 higher than a similarly equipped gas car, and the mileage might be just slightly better. As well, diesel fuel seems to often be around 10 cents per litre higher than gas around here, which would negate any savings on mileage that one might obtain. I ended up with a new Chevy Cruze Eco at just over $20k brand new. I get around 5.5 l/100km on an average tank, better if I can keep my speed under 110km/h when on the highway (I usually can't...). Anyway, without inputting everything into a spreadsheet to get an exact TCO figure, the Cruze was a good fit in general and ticked all the boxes for me. So far (15 months in), I have 65,000km on it and am very happy. Also, getting over 10,000km to an oil change is nice and is right up there with a diesel engine from what I hear. Anyway, to answer the OP's question, fuel mileage was a very important consideration for me, but had to be considered within the context of how I drive (ie: almost all highway, etc).
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Are you sure your car requires premium? If there is no change in power, mileage or driveability evidently it doesn't.
For my car premium is "recommended" and I'm not surprised that no real difference is detected by my butt-dyno. If you put the car on a real dyno and tested, ya, you'd probably see a small difference in HP output but really meaningless on the street. I would image that putting regular in a car that absolutely requires premium it would be more apparent though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I get around 5.5 l/100km on an average tank, better if I can keep my speed under 110km/h when on the highway (I usually can't...).
I'd be happy with 5.5 real world, that's very good.

I'm unhappy with the latest VW diesel offerings, they boosted the base car price (mid trim and up only) and reduced the mileage for more power compared to the older models. :( Diesel around here normally is 6-10 cents lower than regular but there have been some price jumps due to "shortage" issues, or so they claim.
 
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