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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering how many seriously consider the amount they will spend on fuel when getting a new/used car?

If you drive very few km's it probably won't matter much but even for the average 20k km's a year it can add up. I see many of my neighbors buy trucks/SUVs with no real need to do so. A difference of 4L/100 kms adds up to near $1000 a year and I think many small car vs truck comparisons will probably be in the 6-9L/100km range difference. So it seems this is one area many choose not to save money on.
 

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We put on very few miles so buy a good used car with low mileage. We are more sensitive to purchase price than efficiency. Our major expenses are depreciation and insurance.
 

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I do the same as kcowan, if I had to drive much more than I do now I probably would be more diligant. As it is though I have a 4 cylinder standard that does get very good mileage and has low km's, it just happened to be the right car at the time.
 

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I've started to consider it the past few years. I do miss driving V8's, but couldn't ignore the sticker shock. It's certainly nice filling up twice a month rather than once a week. I do miss my Camaro though (sold it in 2008).
 

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I have to do daycare drop-off and pick-up and commute about 40kms worth of in-city driving every day. Lots of lights, lots of acceleration and deceleration, lots of 40 kph to 60 kph zones. With my Prius, I can do this whole commute averaging about 4.5L/100 KM and can do over 700 KM on a tank that costs me about $45 to fill-up, ALL city driving. Even compared with our previous vehicle, a 4 cylinder RAV4, we use less than half the fuel as we used to. Saving money was part of it, but really I hate the idea of wasting gas for no productive reason.
 

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Many of the taxis is Vancouver are Prius Hybrids and they swear by them for gas mileage. I suppose 40km a day would justify one. I had thought it would be more than double that. Have you done the analysis on the extra purchase price?
 

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I have a 2012 Prius V (the station wagon) and I get about 4.5/100 city and about 5.0/100 overall - highway driving actually bumps me up. I make a conscious effort to try to maximize use of the electric motor using hypermiling techniques, so for example if I am coming up to a light and I see that it is red, then I take my foot off the gas and glide towards the light - often with other people burning past me just so they can slam the breaks when they get to the light. What's nice about the toyota hybrid system (not sure about other companies), the electric motor actually recharges when you brake and when you glide without your foot on the gas, so if you manage it effectively, you can use the electric motor alot while constantly recharging it - dowhill sections are the best for this.

In terms of the extra purchase price - it depends what you are comparing it to. We went from leasing (I know this is a cardinal sin in a frugality forum) a RAV4 to leasing our Prius V and the monthly cost is actually lower to lease the Prius in addition to the $100-125 fuel savings each month. I am not sure what else you might compare it to since the Prius V is truly a family vehicle with tons of cargo space - but in terms of overall vehicle cost when purchased new, it is good value no question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Over the long haul, in 10 years you'd probably save 20,000 in fuel if compared to a 12L/100 minivan doing 20K kms a year. Not sure what the Prius maintenance costs are over 10 years (new battery needed?) so that might dig into the savings a fair bit.
 

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on the other hand minivan might save you your life in a big collision vs prius... mileage isn't everything

Over the long haul, in 10 years you'd probably save 20,000 in fuel if compared to a 12L/100 minivan doing 20K kms a year. Not sure what the Prius maintenance costs are over 10 years (new battery needed?) so that might dig into the savings a fair bit.
 

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I'm cheap. I always consider sticker price and cost of operation when looking to purchase a vehicle. I'd have to be in a much better financial position then I am now before I'd consider buying anything but a 4 cylinder car even with a family of 4. Given the option to pay more up front for lower operating costs? I like this idea because I hate to be tied up with monthly bills and operating costs. The more free cash flow I have the better as far as I'm concerned. That said you won't catch me buying another new vehicle for a long time either and I'm not brave enough to buy a used hybrid just yet. So although I love the idea of the Prius I'm just not there yet.
 

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I own a 13-year-old Mazda, 4-cylin. standard transmission that gets pretty good mileage. My next car will be very (even more) fuel efficient. I drive about 40 km each day.
 

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I own a 13-year-old Mazda, 4-cylin. standard transmission that gets pretty good mileage. My next car will be very (even more) fuel efficient. I drive about 40 km each day.
We have a 2005 Civic standard trans......don't drive a lot locally, (walk when we can), but if we do (have to) go somewhere it's usually (at minimum) a couple hundred km round trip.

Don't like paying for gas, but we do like a small, peppy, maneuverable vehicle....win/win.
 

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Decide on what you want to spend on fuel in a year relative to the utility you need the vehicle for.

In our household we have a mid sized crew cab pickup truck for around the house fix up jobs, hauling things too big for the car around, and taking four of us off on driving summer vacations going camping or canoeing. Most of the year it sits in the underground garage of my work place. Travels 5k per year on average for work related travel, all reimbursed at 0.50 per km. then maybe 2-3k for personal use other than vacations, and vacations is the big variable - 0.5k to 5k depending on the year.

Hauling utility offsets the insurance for a really otherwise under used vehicle - last weekend given 4 book shelves (if new about $500) we had a good use for for free becuase we could haul them away ourselves from downsizing pals. Also took a whole bunch of e-waste to the scrap yard for them, and pocketted over $80 in scrap value.

Truck consumes about 14k/100 km summer, and worse on short trips in the winter. Bought it knowing it would eat more gas, but gave more utility than a car.
Bought a V8 over 6 at the time when gas prices high, because it was $2k less than the comparable 6 cylinder models. $2k is a lot of gas whe you don't drive much.

Every day little car- can just fit 4 of us, and takes wife to work daily, and us out and about on evenings and week ends. A tight squeeze for a weekend away visiting if going in the winter time with coats, snow pants etc.
It travels about 15k per year, and averages about 8l/100km.

Bicycle - used for my daily commute in nice weather - $25 at a garage sale 8 years ago.

Feet for walking in when too crappy weather to bike - free; boots a wedding gift from my wife. Still going strong after 18 years, 2 sets of soles, and numerous re-stitchings.
 

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I haven't really considered gas mileage as a primary factor when choosing a vehicle. But one thing I ensure is that it uses regular gas and not premium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I did a comparison for a friend who owns a small truck and really doesn't use the truck for what it is. My car just turned over 200K kms and has a lifetime average of 6.2L/100 (~75% city/25% hwy) so doing the math I would have paid out an extra $16000 over the 10 years had I owned the same truck. Now for me, I'd rather invest that $16K than burn it!
 

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I consider the "fleet" fuel economy. Two vehicles get terrible mileage, my truck, and my old car. The minivan gets better mileage.

When it comes time to purchase my next vehicle, I certainly don't want worse fuel economy. I'll always have the old car, and I'll always need a truck. So when I go looking for a vehicles it will come down to finding a list of truck/minivans that fit my needs, and then looking at fuel economy and sticker cost.
 

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We owned a VW jetta TDI, it would get around 900km/tank (5L/100) about 45 bucks to fill up.

Fuel economy definitely plays a role in our car making decisions.
 

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I'm from the UK and mileage played a massive part in my decision. Roughly $2.20 per litre fuel.

I owned a diesel and we are soon to be considering a second car. I would probably go for a golf TDI but considering the price I doubt it will be worth the premium based on the fuel savings / mileage I will be travelling.

Instead I may consider a smaller utility truck such as a Ford Ranger.

It really depends on what mileage you were doing. But if I were to be frugal and buy new then it would be Diesel over Hydbrid. I would never consider a second hand Prius / EV.

The motorbike is awesome on fuel. Aprrox 65mpg (safety factors aside)
 

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I think the best way to approach this if you want to save money is to look at cost per kilometer traveled. It's hard to figure out, but if you look at your transportation options as a portfolio you can find ways to reduce your overall cost per kilometer by using the cheapest transportation mode that will get you there in time.

For example, walking and biking would have the lowest cost/km, public transit would have the next lowest, then bus, then train, then car, then airplane.

Using that portfolio approach we keep our cost per km pretty low; we walk and bike whenever practical (nearly all of our grocery shopping and local errands are done by foot or bike), take public transit for most of our travel within the city, and always look for a fuel-efficient and reliable car to keep that cost/km to a minimum. For longer distances bus is usually cheaper than driving but usually takes more time; train is more expensive but faster, but ultimately it depends on things like traffic avoided and time spent trying to find parking or paying for parking in your destination. We never, ever drive to Toronto, for example; we always take the train.
 
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