Canadian Money Forum banner
4421 - 4440 of 4565 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,574 Posts
I was on warfarin for years for atrial fibrillation. Nasty stuff that requires constant blood tests to monitor the levels.

I switched to better medicines decades ago and eventually got the afib fixed when they came up with cardiac ablation techniques.

I don't know why anyone would still be on warfarin. Not only harmful but a good chance of bleeding to death if you get a bad cut or hemmorrage.

Tell the guy to talk to his MD or some other MD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,547 Posts
Canadian public health officials (really thanks to BC's leadership) just had a huge win, though sadly it's not being reported and not being appreciated by the public.

All Canadians owe public health a big thanks from this.

Many months ago, BC's research was the basis for the argument that vaccine intervals can be lengthened. The argument was made, including through medical journal letters, that historically speaking vaccine spacing does not make much of a difference and in fact, there can be a stronger immune response with some extra delay between doses.

BC and Canada's position was supported in letters by other international medical experts. As you know it became the policy in Canada.

Now it's been vindicated. Newer studies are showing some benefit from extra delay between mRNA doses. So many of us ... myself included ... have actually ended up with stronger protection than originally believed. We are likely going to have longer lasting and more robust immunity than some Americans, who rushed and sped up their dose regimen.

When BC's experts put out that argument a few months ago, I was on board with their theory and rationale.

They were right. What's really awesome here is that we have experts in our health system who are using their brains, using medical theory + intuition to make strategic decisions. They are making good decisions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
Now it's been vindicated. Newer studies are showing some benefit from extra delay between mRNA doses.
It is not going to be a game changer for Canada.
January will be the month most vaccinated will lose their protection and it won’t be much different from last winter without vaccines.
Covid Vaccines turned out to be a really profitable business for big pharma, and as I said earlier, all those trials are strongly fabricated to give you 95% of efficacy
another marketing strategy among many.
November 2020 news
Analysis of the data indicates a vaccine efficacy rate of 95%
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,547 Posts
It is not going to be a game changer for Canada.
January will be the month most vaccinated will lose their protection and it won’t be much different from last winter without vaccines.
Covid Vaccines turned out to be a really profitable business for big pharma, and as I said earlier, all those trials are strongly fabricated to give you 95% of efficacy
You have such a negative interpretation of this situation.

Protection doesn't just expire at a fixed time. Even with reduced effectiveness, the vaccines we've already gotten are very effective against serious outcomes. There is no imminent problem here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,035 Posts

The pessimist says, " Things could not get worse."

The optimist says, " Oh yes they can." “

(originally a Soviet joke)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
Nine of the 22 people who died from COVID-19 in Saskatchewan in August were fully vaccinated. Most of those who died despite their vaccinations were over the age of 60, as per the provincial government.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,758 Posts
I was on warfarin for years for atrial fibrillation. Nasty stuff that requires constant blood tests to monitor the levels.

I switched to better medicines decades ago and eventually got the afib fixed when they came up with cardiac ablation techniques.

I don't know why anyone would still be on warfarin. Not only harmful but a good chance of bleeding to death if you get a bad cut or hemmorrage.

Tell the guy to talk to his MD or some other MD.
So you took rat poison at the direction of a doctor.
Just like some people are taking antiparasitics at the direction of a doctor.

Not sure what the issue is then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,574 Posts
No.......not my doctor. It was prescribed, and still is for patients who can't take the new medicines, by virtually every cardiologist in the world.

It isn't the same as taking your direction from some "internet doctor" advising you to take a drug unproven to be effective.

I saw a doctor interviewed who said he was fielding calls every day from patients who wanted him to prescribe Ivermectin to them.

He refused........as most doctors would. Now those people are calling their doctors demanding a medical exemption from vaccination.

No luck there either. Most doctors have ethical standards.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beaver101

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,023 Posts
No.......not my doctor. It was prescribed, and still is for patients who can't take the new medicines, by virtually every cardiologist in the world.
... Coumadin is the brand name for that too.

It isn't the same as taking your direction from some "internet doctor" advising you to take a drug unproven to be effective.

I saw a doctor interviewed who said he was fielding calls every day from patients who wanted him to prescribe Ivermectin to them.

He refused........as most doctors would. Now those people are calling their doctors demanding a medical exemption from vaccination.

No luck there either. Most doctors have ethical standards.
... but some people prefer to DIYs from the internet because they're so sure about the cure ... their version of a cure. I wonder if there is an annual fee for cult membership or is it just a life cost?
 
  • Like
Reactions: sags

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,257 Posts
From the sources I have looked at the third shot increases the antibody levels by 5 fold. That is a pretty strong defence against covid.
5 fold for everyone or 5 fold for immune compromised?

For the rest of us, I am not sure more antibodies will reduce the breakthrough infections that much but they certainly help keep a person out of the hospital and above ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,823 Posts
Well we all heard the Alberta bashing on the news lately how our hospitals are stretched to the limit.
This from our Alberta Health Services website today

AHS has about 8,500 acute care beds across the province – 98.6 per cent of those beds are open and available for patients.
AHS has about 1,200 emergency department care spaces across the province. Of those, 98.6 per cent are open and available.


I wonder if the CBC ever even uses a phone before printing their drivel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,871 Posts
Well we all heard the Alberta bashing on the news lately how our hospitals are stretched to the limit.
This from our Alberta Health Services website today

AHS has about 8,500 acute care beds across the province – 98.6 per cent of those beds are open and available for patients.
AHS has about 1,200 emergency department care spaces across the province. Of those, 98.6 per cent are open and available.


I wonder if the CBC ever even uses a phone before printing their drivel?
I don't know what they mean by "open and available" because they are cancelling surgeries in Calgary due to lack of ICU beds.

Here's a CBC article about how they don't really know the answer, because AHS doesn't provide the number. But there's apparently 272 beds overall, and current reporting is showing 169 beds used by Covid patients.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,257 Posts
I think you need to be cognizant of the difference between total provincial capacity and individual hospital and city capacity. Outbreaks tend to come in clusters and therefore the ICU admissions will not be equal across the province and all the hospitals. I can also imagine that the ability to transfer someone, especially in an ICU setting, would also be problematic. The other consideration one needs to factor in is the difference between maximum capacity and how long a health care setting can service that capacity. So in other words, max capacity for so many days, something less then max capacity for more days. etc. Lastly one has to factor in the difference between having a an ICU bed and having the staff to look after it.

The above understanding goes a long way in understanding the true nature of our healthcare system, its capacity and when a cry for help is a true need or just a loud amount of noise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,574 Posts
Well we all heard the Alberta bashing on the news lately how our hospitals are stretched to the limit.
This from our Alberta Health Services website today

AHS has about 8,500 acute care beds across the province – 98.6 per cent of those beds are open and available for patients.
AHS has about 1,200 emergency department care spaces across the province. Of those, 98.6 per cent are open and available.


I wonder if the CBC ever even uses a phone before printing their drivel?
That doesn't make any sense.

They say that 98% of hospital beds in Calgary are full and 96% in Edmonton.

 
4421 - 4440 of 4565 Posts
Top