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Add me to the list. Sardine salad sandwiches are good. Sardines, mayo , onions and green peppers mixed like tuna salad. I like anchovies on pizza too where noone else does it seems.

Pickled herring is also good but more a delicacy.
 

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This thread made me sardine conscious so today I tried something new. I made a batch of haluski, that is, sweet onlon, shredded cabbage, shredded parsnip and egg noodles stir fried in butter with smoked paprika and a dash of cayenne pepper. This time I added some sardines. The strong salty taste of the sardines overpowered the sweet haluski but it wasn't bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Looking at some Youtube recipes I saw this one that looks good, Chef John's Pasta con le Sarde or Sicilian style pasta with sardines and fennel.
Here's something I tried, a lazy version of what Rusty posted. This was very quick to prepare, about 2 mins of work after the pasta was cooked.

Boil some pasta, noodles, whatever
Add into a sauce pan
Olive oil
Sardines in tomato sauce (Brunswick sells these)
Add spices: garlic, salt, Italian herbs
Break the sardines apart and stir in
Take off heat and top with lemon juice

That's a pretty good dinner for $3 to $4
 

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We tend to drain most of the soya oil, depending on what recipe is being used. Soya oil seems to get mixed reviews as far as health risks/benefits goes and much is said to come from GMO sources. So I trust olive oil more.

Try the garlic rice, for sure. This is where I have to depart from the Norwegian way of doing things (with potatoes usually taking the place of rice) and go with my wife's Filipino influence. She makes it better than I can and she has never used a recipe, just follows what she learned growing up. But the following recipe looks like it should produce good results:


The recipe mentions using day-old rice. Come to think of it, that's what my wife always uses. I thought it was just a way of making less-than-fresh rice acceptable, but now I see why it is to be preferred. Also, the recipe does not say so, but sinangag works fine with brown rice, although that's not traditional Filipino. From what I have observed in the Philippines, I would say that only about 1 in 10 Filipinos buys brown rice for everyday consumption (and they eat rice every day, almost with every meal). They grow quite a few different kinds of rice and their language has many words to describe rice, but it's your basic polished white rice that finds its way to the table most of the time. All the others are reserved for more specialized recipes that are not everyday fare.

I used to buy long grain brown basmati rice from Thailand in 20 kg. sacks at places like Rice World and Western Rice Mills in Vancouver's Chinatown district. Cost effective to buy like that. If it will take you forever to use 20 kilos, share with friends.
On the subject of rice, I usually buy white long grain rice in the big 20 lb or, is it 8 kilo? bag.
While you are in the grocery store go around to the deli or bakery department and ask for a food grade, 5 gallon plastic pail. Sometimes they will give you one, sometimes they charge a couple of bucks. They get cole slaw, icing, pie filling etc in them.
I keep the rice in the sealed pail and take some out as I need it, usually I keep some in the cupboard in a juice pitcher which makes it easy to measure out as needed. One bag costs around $12 or $14 and will feed one person 2 meals a day for a year.
 

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The recipe mentions using day-old rice. Come to think of it, that's what my wife always uses. I thought it was just a way of making less-than-fresh rice acceptable, but now I see why it is to be preferred.

I used to buy long grain brown basmati rice from Thailand in 20 kg. sacks at places like Rice World and Western Rice Mills in Vancouver's Chinatown district. Cost effective to buy like that. If it will take you forever to use 20 kilos, share with friends.
day or even two day old rice is preferred by all good asian restaurants. It takes out the moisture and then when your fry the rice, it imparts the flavours better while keeping the grains in tact, so you don’t get ‘broken’ or mushy rice.

rice ‘ages’ nicely too. If kept in an airtight bins it can last for years. Try rice that has been aged safely for 10 or 20 years. My mom used to buy multiple 20kg sacks and store them in metal garbage bin (like the ones for Oscar the grouch) only for rice. When my mom had her stroke we were about to throw out the hundreds of pounds of rice, and my dad the former restaurant owner told us to stop, it’s been aging. So we did try some, and it is different in a good way. Though I cant unless I make regular rice and this aged rice.

I grew up if you have less than 20lbs of rice in yur bin, you need to start rationing until you get more.

This is funny, I posted this thread thinking that sardines / anchovies were a pretty weird and unusual thing to eat ... but it sounds like everyone at CMF eats them!

I wasn't expecting this response. Lots of great ideas here.
great thread. I haven’t had sardine since I lived at home, and I think I hated them then. However some of these recipes like the fried rice, and chopping them up an putting them into little things has made me think think it’s worth a try again. I think it’s a sign as they are on sale this week and I have never even glanced at them until this thread.
 

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^
rice ‘ages’ nicely too. If kept in an airtight bins it can last for years. Try rice that has been aged safely for 10 or 20 years. My mom used to buy multiple 20kg sacks and store them in metal garbage bin (like the ones for Oscar the grouch) only for rice. When my mom had her stroke we were about to throw out the hundreds of pounds of rice, and my dad the former restaurant owner told us to stop, it’s been aging. So we did try some, and it is different in a good way. Though I cant unless I make regular rice and this aged rice. ...
... question: how do you air-tight the bins? Or are they special bins?

I had bags of rice (different kinds - wild, brown & regular whites as consumption was not quick enough and partly forgotten) that went rancid and discarding them out in the organic bin didn't make me feel any better ...
 

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Brown rice is more likely to go rancid from the fats in the germ. So, probably better to only store white rice. Keeping brown rice cool, dry and dark will help. My mother took to storing flour in the chest freezer.
 

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Brown rice is more likely to go rancid from the fats in the germ. So, probably better to only store white rice. Keeping brown rice cool, dry and dark will help. My mother took to storing flour in the chest freezer.
... thanks for the tip, andrewf. I'll take note of it.
 

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I mentioned in a previous thread that you can get food grade plastic 5 gallon containers from the deli or bakery department of your supermarket. These have tight fitting lids often with a rubber or neoprene seal.
... thanks Rusty, I'll check into those containers.
 

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^
... question: how do you air-tight the bins? Or are they special bins?

I had bags of rice (different kinds - wild, brown & regular whites as consumption was not quick enough and partly forgotten) that went rancid and discarding them out in the organic bin didn't make me feel any better ...
Honestly my mom did a lot of hacks. She would take a couple 50 jobs bags of rice throw in a large metal new garbage can (oscar the grouch type). They she would cover it with a sheet of plastic. I seem to think it was a worn out plastic table cloth pl and squeeze the thing shut. i found 3 or 4 bins like this and they were fine. They were easily 10 years old.
I don’t do the same. I have large storage containers that hold about 25 lbs from Tupperware. One large bag last us just over a year.

my parents only ate white rice, brown does go faster.
 

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I think there's still a pretty good herring fishery here in NL ( or herrin' as some pronounce it!), though I don't think much of it stays here ( we love our cod!) wonder where most of it ends up? I think herring, mackerel and sardines are all kinda in the same " family", no?
 

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If you are on a low sodium diet 2 brands of sardine to look for are Metro Irresistibles Canadian sardines in spring water 'no salt added' 110mg sodium or 5% for 1/2 a 106g can 84g drained. Oddly enough the front says Canadian sardines but on the back it says Product of Poland.
The other is Gold Seal wild sardines in spring water, 140mg sodium or 5% per 1 can, drained. One can is 125g or 81g drained.
 

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You could email them and ask what the story is with their polish canadian sardines. Maybe they are caught in Canadian waters but processed in Poland (it would be strange but not impossible).
 

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You could email them and ask what the story is with their polish canadian sardines. Maybe they are caught in Canadian waters but processed in Poland (it would be strange but not impossible).
Careful reading of the back of the package reveals that Canadian Sardine is the common name of Clupea Harengus a fish that is found in the northeast Atlantic and Baltic sea. The ones in the can are wild caught by midwater trawl, purse seine in northern Europe, presumably by a Polish trawler or sold to a Polish canner.
If you have further questions they give a helpful phone number 1 866 595 5554
 

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My theory is that those sardines were born in Poland, then immigrated to Canada, where they were caught. Just like my parents - born in Norway, then immigrated and became Canadian citizens. They were still products of Norway. :)
 
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