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Brunswick Sardine Fillets are my goto afternoon snack, eaten right from the tin can. I love them all, but particularly like the golden smoked. If you don't mind eating whole-fish (minus the head/tail), go for the regular Brunswick Sardines hot peppers flavour. So good...
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Sometimes just as is, as a snack, other times as a sandwich.

Portugal is famous for their sardines, so if you ever visit, you can stock up. That being said, there may be a grocery store that specializes in European groceries and you can see if there is anything different you like instead of the normal New Brunswick sardines.
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Sardines + garlic rice is an interesting idea.

I bought the same Brunswick one shown in your photo. When you open one of those, how much of the oil do you include in your food?
We tend to drain most of the soya oil, depending on what recipe is being used. Soya oil seems to get mixed reviews as far as health risks/benefits goes and much is said to come from GMO sources. So I trust olive oil more.

Try the garlic rice, for sure. This is where I have to depart from the Norwegian way of doing things (with potatoes usually taking the place of rice) and go with my wife's Filipino influence. She makes it better than I can and she has never used a recipe, just follows what she learned growing up. But the following recipe looks like it should produce good results:


The recipe mentions using day-old rice. Come to think of it, that's what my wife always uses. I thought it was just a way of making less-than-fresh rice acceptable, but now I see why it is to be preferred. Also, the recipe does not say so, but sinangag works fine with brown rice, although that's not traditional Filipino. From what I have observed in the Philippines, I would say that only about 1 in 10 Filipinos buys brown rice for everyday consumption (and they eat rice every day, almost with every meal). They grow quite a few different kinds of rice and their language has many words to describe rice, but it's your basic polished white rice that finds its way to the table most of the time. All the others are reserved for more specialized recipes that are not everyday fare.

I used to buy long grain brown basmati rice from Thailand in 20 kg. sacks at places like Rice World and Western Rice Mills in Vancouver's Chinatown district. Cost effective to buy like that. If it will take you forever to use 20 kilos, share with friends.
 

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For what it's worth, light tuna (usually yellowfin, skipjack, etc.) is relatively low mercury, and cheaper, than albacore/white tuna. Still has about 25% of the omega 3 as salmon. No need to give up on tuna, if you enjoy it.
 

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I have some Brunswick tins on hand most of the time. I eat them for lunch once in a while with crackers, cheese and maybe a bit of dry sausage.

My friend's dad sometimes makes perogies with sardine stuffing. I can't get my friend to ask for the recipe -- he hates them himself.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
This is funny, I posted this thread thinking that sardines / anchovies were a pretty weird and unusual thing to eat ... but it sounds like everyone at CMF eats them!

I wasn't expecting this response. Lots of great ideas here.
 

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Raincoast distributes some good quality sardines. Great on toast, grilled sandwiches, with pasta, straight out of the tin, etc. If you get the chance try their canned Tuna. It's not cheap and you will wonder what you've been eating all these years.

Sardines may be lower on the food chain but they are a "fatty fish". Contaminants accumulate in fatty tissue.

Moderation, variety, etc...
 

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This is funny, I posted this thread thinking that sardines / anchovies were a pretty weird and unusual thing to eat ... but it sounds like everyone at CMF eats them!

I wasn't expecting this response. Lots of great ideas here.
They are still a bit weird to me... I always saw them as something old people ate. I like some of the ideas in this thread, though. Maybe not enough to run out and buy sardines, but perhaps one day.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Brunswick Sardine Fillets are my goto afternoon snack, eaten right from the tin can. I love them all, but particularly like the golden smoked. If you don't mind eating whole-fish (minus the head/tail), go for the regular Brunswick Sardines hot peppers flavour. So good...
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I tried my first Brunswick sardine can today (just the plain soy oil). I had them on toast... I like it! Very nice flavour
 

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I like the GoldSeal sardines in Thai Chili Sauce ... you can make it a meal out of that tin with ... rice, noodles/pasta or bagels.

That garlic fried rice recipe from MP looks really interesting ... and tasty.
 

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An interesting thread. I don't think I have ever tried sardines, and if I have, it was a looooong time ago. So, can anyone recommend a brand for a sardine noob to start with?

Also, would you still buy sardines if they were not inexpensive?
 

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An interesting thread. I don't think I have ever tried sardines, and if I have, it was a looooong time ago. So, can anyone recommend a brand for a sardine noob to start with?

Also, would you still buy sardines if they were not inexpensive?
Brunswick brand. There a nice snack and good for you. Very versatile.
 

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^^ Brunswick is a well-known Canadian brand.

Also, would you still buy sardines if they were not inexpensive?
... not really if there's a same-price alternative. Eg. sardines versus pink salmon versus wild Coho salmon ☑
 

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An interesting thread. I don't think I have ever tried sardines, and if I have, it was a looooong time ago. So, can anyone recommend a brand for a sardine noob to start with?
The Kersen sardines (we get ours at Costco) pictured in my first post to this thread might suit you well for starters. They are sardine fillets, not the whole fish. Most sardines you buy (Brunswick included) are pretty much the whole fish with just the head cut off. So they still include fins, sometimes the tail and the guts. As to the latter, some find themselves performing minor surgery on each fish to remove the innards, but that is not really necessary.

The sardines from Norway I mentioned are quite a bit smaller than the Brunswick and some other types, and some prefer the smaller size. I also find them to have a milder flavour.

Also, would you still buy sardines if they were not inexpensive?
Yes, because as some have mentioned, right out of the can is good, or right from the can onto toast. I don't find salmon or tuna to be as good eaten right from the tin. Those usually need a bit more done, at least the addition of a bit of mayo or such.
 
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