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Discussion Starter #1
I am a Canadian citizen by birth and a life long resident of Canada. I can obtain UK citizenship by descent from my mother, who was born in England. (Cost about 160 C$) I know that the UK is no longer part of the EU so it would not help with EU travel, but are there any negatives (cons) to me obtaining it? Unintended consequences?
 

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Not that I know of.

I got mine a few years ago and it's paid for itself so far because it let me avoid paying visa fees to Chile, Argentina, and Brazil by entering on my British passport instead of Canadian. I originally got it for EU reasons so was kind of annoyed when Brexit happened, but it has still been useful to me.
 

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I am a Canadian citizen by birth and a life long resident of Canada. I can obtain UK citizenship by descent from my mother, who was born in England. (Cost about 160 C$) I know that the UK is no longer part of the EU so it would not help with EU travel, but are there any negatives (cons) to me obtaining it? Unintended consequences?

For it to pass from your mother, you must have been born after 1983. Before that, it could only pass from the father.

The question would be why do you want it? I have it and basically consider it useless now since Brexit.
 

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Discussion Starter #4

For it to pass from your mother, you must have been born after 1983. Before that, it could only pass from the father.

The question would be why do you want it? I have it and basically consider it useless now since Brexit.
I was born in 1953 and think I'd be eligible according to this link, but you're likely right its likely of little value to me.
I had thought if I obtained it I might be eligible for NHS if I were to spend some extended time there but looking at those rules it doesn't appear so.
 

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Both of my parents were born in the UK, as were my grandparents. One of my spouse‘s grandparents was born in the UK. We were born in 52 and 54 respectively.

In 1978 be both applied for and were granted Certificates Of Patriality. We were going to Europe and wanted the ability to work. It granted us everything except the vote. We could work, go on the dole, use the health care system, the lot.

Our son, born in 85 did the same in 2008. I believe the name of the status has changed. Everything else was the same. He obtained it on the strength that both grandparents were born in the UK. He literally got off the plane and few days later he was working..complete with an NIS (National Insurance) number. It was very straightforward, fast. He simply sent in the birth certificates of the grandparents, his passport. And I believe $75 cad.
 

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My father was born in England. When I went there as a student, I did submit the relevant documentation. No cost that I recall. I was issued some paperwork that said something to the effect that I no longer had to advise the Home Secretary of my whereabouts. I was eligible to apply for a British Passport, but never bothered.
 

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I was born in 1953 and think I'd be eligible according to this link, but you're likely right its likely of little value to me.
I had thought if I obtained it I might be eligible for NHS if I were to spend some extended time there but looking at those rules it doesn't appear so.
In recent years, the UK has changed its rules regarding citizenship by descent. So while well meant I am sure, what someone did some years ago are quite probably irrelevant. Only the rules that apply today matter.

The link you posted is the exact same link as I posted for you Retiredguy. it clearly shows the difference if you were born before 1983 or after. You were born before which means you can get citizenship if your FATHER was British but you mentioned only your Mother in your OP. After 1983 you can qualify if EITHER your Father or Mother was British.

You say you believe the link shows you would be eligible. Then you MUST be saying your Father was also a British Citizen and you could apply by descent from him, not your Mother.

Going on to your point re NHS coverage. IF you were able to obtain citizenship by descent from your Father, then YES you could be covered IF you could prove that you were 'ordinary resident' in the UK.

The definition of 'ordinary resident' can be found here at 2.2:

NHS coverage can be found at 5 on that link. It used to be there was a waiting period before coverage as there is here in Canada with a Canadian citizen returning to Canada and getting coverage on a Provincial health plan. But there is no waiting period for the NHS now at all. You just have to be able to show you are 'ordinary resident' and that does not require showing you intend for it to be for a long time. The requirement is only that you show you are 'ordinary resident' FOR THE TIME BEING, whether you intend it to be a short or long period of time.

So, IF you can get citizenship and IF you wanted to do so so that you could stay in the UK for a period of time, then it might make sense to apply. Not only would you get NHS coverage, other factors might matter as well. For example, a Canadian tourist can only stay in the UK for up to 6 months. IF you wanted to stay longer than that, then obviously having a UK passport would allow you to do so.

So, was your Father a British Citizen or not Retiredguy?
 

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Then you would have to try and obtain citizenship by registration. A bit more complicated and time consuming including having to go to a ceremony at an Embassy or Consulate to swear allegiance to the Queen. Mandatory.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Then you would have to try and obtain citizenship by registration. A bit more complicated and time consuming including having to go to a ceremony at an Embassy or Consulate to swear allegiance to the Queen. Mandatory.
Yes, I know that. The link I earlier posted (and researched before my original post) said that and my original post was correct "I can obtain UK citizenship by descent from my mother, who was born in England."

If my father had been a UK citizen I would automatically have had citizenship when I was born. With Females/Mothers that did not apply in 1953. The 1981 laws changed that to give females the same privilege, it's retro active, but requires registration. The only other condition I can see is that one must be of good character!

Your Mea Culpa is accepted.... LOL.

Cheers!
 

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but are there any negatives (cons) to me obtaining it? Unintended consequences?
A few years ago, Harper introduced legislation that weakened the citizenships of dual citizens. If one was convicted of a serious crime, this introduced the possibility of banishment from Canada even if you were born in Canada. One could have their citizenship stripped, and sent to their other country.

Legal experts around Canada objected to this because it introduced different tiers of citizenship. It also introduced the possibility of duplicate, repetitive punishments (first criminal conviction, then banishment) which runs contrary to legal norms.

Harper's legislation was reversed by Trudeau, restoring the Canadian convention that all citizens are equal. However I think it's worth keeping this sad bit of history in mind. It's possible that down the road, depending on the values of who is in government, that dual citizens could again be seen as lesser citizens.

Now in your case, we're talking about UK citizenship so you likely wouldn't have been affected by Harper's legislation (assuming you are white). I'm reasonably certain that the Harper government's intent was to discriminate against Muslim immigrants such as those with middle eastern descent.

In summary: dual citizenship may potentially reduce the strength of your Canadian citizenship, as was the case in 2015. Some social conservatives still support this kind of policy and may bring it back. However if you're white and British, you are likely exempt from this. If you're not white or not Christian, you may want to seriously think about this. The existence of a dual citizenship could become an excuse for a racist or xenophobic government to cause additional problems for you down the road.
 

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Yes, I know that. The link I earlier posted (and researched before my original post) said that and my original post was correct "I can obtain UK citizenship by descent from my mother, who was born in England."

If my father had been a UK citizen I would automatically have had citizenship when I was born. With Females/Mothers that did not apply in 1953. The 1981 laws changed that to give females the same privilege, it's retro active, but requires registration. The only other condition I can see is that one must be of good character!

Your Mea Culpa is accepted.... LOL.

Cheers!
I think that when I said above that your link was the same link as I posted, what happened Retiredguy was that I must have clicked on MY link instead of your link. Yes, mea culpa.

So you can get citizenship, that leaves the question of will it be worth while and I would say no for a relatively short visit and yes if you were thinking of a longer visit of say more than 6 months. Being able to access NHS vs. having to buy travel medical insurance for such a long period would make sense.

As to your character, well, that all depends on who they ask I suppose. LOL
 

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With few exceptions, one notable being South Africans, most immigrants to Canada who become Canadian citizens do in fact have dual citizenship. Passports are simply proof of citizenship. That is what made Andrew Scheer's comments in the past about dual citizenship seem so ridiculous.

How many immigrants to Canada actually think of, let alone go through the process of renouncing their former citizenship. And to what end. The only ones that I know of that have done it were formally American citizens. They did it to avoid the bother and cost of filing a US tax return each year even though they had not been resident for years and had no intention of returning.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I think that when I said above that your link was the same link as I posted, what happened Retiredguy was that I must have clicked on MY link instead of your link. Yes, mea culpa.

So you can get citizenship, that leaves the question of will it be worth while and I would say no for a relatively short visit and yes if you were thinking of a longer visit of say more than 6 months. Being able to access NHS vs. having to buy travel medical insurance for such a long period would make sense.

As to your character, well, that all depends on who they ask I suppose. LOL
Thanks LTA. Ones character is always in progress, I like to think that most for me would say so far, so good!

Reading section 5 page 9 - "Doctors Dentists & Hospitals" of the NHS link you sent is interesting and suggests to me that even travel insurance may not be needed. Emergency and primary GP care is available free for all, and only Secondary care requires being a "Ordinary Resident" , and the definition of that seems extremely broad. In any event if I do travel there I will have Travel Insurance.

Interesting researching some of this stuff, my wife's father was UK born so we both could have UK citizenship, but unlikely we'll pursue it.

Thanks for chiming in.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Both of my parents were born in the UK, as were my grandparents. One of my spouse‘s grandparents was born in the UK. We were born in 52 and 54 respectively.

In 1978 be both applied for and were granted Certificates Of Patriality. We were going to Europe and wanted the ability to work. It granted us everything except the vote. We could work, go on the dole, use the health care system, the lot.

Our son, born in 85 did the same in 2008. I believe the name of the status has changed. Everything else was the same. He obtained it on the strength that both grandparents were born in the UK. He literally got off the plane and few days later he was working..complete with an NIS (National Insurance) number. It was very straightforward, fast. He simply sent in the birth certificates of the grandparents, his passport. And I believe $75 cad.
My wifes father was UK born and like you she obtained a Cert. of Patriality, This was in 1972 and she left Canada intending to stay in England but quickly found her junior level banking pay wouldn't suffice, so she returned home.
 

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Looking farther down the road, it may make sense to obtain UK citizenship right now if you can and then IF your connection is through Scotland, (ie. Scottish parent) wait for Scotland to go independent from the UK and re-join the EU. There is a real chance that may happen. If so, you would be able to then change to a Scottish Passport and have access to all of the EU again. That is what I am personally hoping for as I am of Scottish background.
 

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The thought that a UK passport is useless since Brexit is narrow minded thinking that ignores that the majority voted to leave, not to stay.
 

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The thought that a UK passport is useless since Brexit is narrow minded thinking that ignores that the majority voted to leave, not to stay.
I don't understand what the majority vote has to do with the usefulness of a passport. It is undeniably less useful since Brexit than before Brexit, but the majority voters in the UK were not likely focusing on the usefulness of their passports when they voted.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
A few years ago, Harper introduced legislation that weakened the citizenships of dual citizens. If one was convicted of a serious crime, this introduced the possibility of banishment from Canada even if you were born in Canada. One could have their citizenship stripped, and sent to their other country.

Legal experts around Canada objected to this because it introduced different tiers of citizenship. It also introduced the possibility of duplicate, repetitive punishments (first criminal conviction, then banishment) which runs contrary to legal norms.

Harper's legislation was reversed by Trudeau, restoring the Canadian convention that all citizens are equal. However I think it's worth keeping this sad bit of history in mind. It's possible that down the road, depending on the values of who is in government, that dual citizens could again be seen as lesser citizens.

Now in your case, we're talking about UK citizenship so you likely wouldn't have been affected by Harper's legislation (assuming you are white). I'm reasonably certain that the Harper government's intent was to discriminate against Muslim immigrants such as those with middle eastern descent.

In summary: dual citizenship may potentially reduce the strength of your Canadian citizenship, as was the case in 2015. Some social conservatives still support this kind of policy and may bring it back. However if you're white and British, you are likely exempt from this. If you're not white or not Christian, you may want to seriously think about this. The existence of a dual citizenship could become an excuse for a racist or xenophobic government to cause additional problems for you down the road.
Interestingly the UK has a provision that even if you were born in the UK, if considered a national security threat, you could lose citizenship.
 
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