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Discussion Starter #1
always looking for a way to save, will share information with fellow members, appreciating this interesting opportunity as a platform to share and show how we can can care as fellow Canadians.

Mining student so I might have a lot to say about traditional mining(not data mining, not bitcoin harvesting, both of which I'm against) and also regarding oil (which I'm definitely not against yet I refused to work in that industry because of environmental and health reasons) since I might have found some interesting stocks to invest in that have a promising future.

Thanks for reading!
 

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But not against the health and environmental aspects of energy intensive open pit mining and use of toxic chemicals in ore processing of, for example, base metals, etc? The degree of which depends on the material being mined.
 

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and also regarding oil (which I'm definitely not against yet I refused to work in that industry because of environmental and health reasons) since I might have found some interesting stocks to invest in that have a promising future.

Thanks for reading!
First become an independent thinker so you do not herd. Not sure what you mean by environmental with oil though if you think man is causing global warming with burning of oil do not bother playing the markets you have to look through Galileo telescope to realize the world is not flat & to not herd.
 

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The OP may be confused with the production and use of oil, versus the production and use of other mined materials. The consumption of a product is a different and separate issue than the production of a product.
 

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Yep, mining never needs water. Tailing ponds are never near water. Tailing pond dikes never rupture. Heavy metals are never released into the surrounding watershed.
 

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OP, we are not pointing fingers at your industry. It's part of our modern landscape and lifestyle. If anything, I think we should point the finger at ourselves for fostering the kind of society that doesn't have the political will to limit the harm from our activities, that worships wealth and consumption.
 

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OP, we are not pointing fingers at your industry. It's part of our modern landscape and lifestyle. If anything, I think we should point the finger at ourselves for fostering the kind of society that doesn't have the political will to limit the harm from our activities, that worships wealth and consumption.
Well, to some degree we are pointing fingers because much of the industry could do better in its mining activities, both in operating and reclamation practices. Some companies are more socially conscious than others with respect to the environment, especially in developing countries where oversight and regulation is less. That said, we consumers could do much better in terms of reducing our consumption and what we should do and expect from recycling efforts.

Regardless, a warm welcome to the OP and glad to have you here. It may take the new generation of mining engineers to demand more of their companies regardless of the specific material being mined.
 

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Well, to some degree we are pointing fingers because much of the industry could do better in its mining activities, both in operating and reclamation practices. Some companies are more socially conscious than others with respect to the environment, especially in developing countries where oversight and regulation is less. That said, we consumers could do much better in terms of reducing our consumption and what we should do and expect from recycling efforts.

Regardless, a warm welcome to the OP and glad to have you here. It may take the new generation of mining engineers to demand more of their companies regardless of the specific material being mined.
Mining has a pretty decent record. 3 tailings dam failures in Canada in 35 yrs is pretty good. None would be better of course. You hear much more environmental issues from other resource industries, pulp and paper and oil transportation in particular. Pretty good industry in Canada that is well regarded internationally which employs a lot of people and a big part of our gdp.
 

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Let him who is without sin cast the first stone.

I doubt there is any industry or activity above reproach. I think on one level it's the competitive nature of business that forces you go near, and sometimes over the line.

If you were a sports fisherman and you see your favorite waterway being killed off by agricultural run-off induced algal blooms, you'd be mad at the farmers. The birdwatcher looks at the fisherman's use of lead tackle and see they are poisoning the loons. The oilman sees the birdwatcher driving all over the province trying to see and photograph birds and calls out the hypocrisy in the call to stamp out the fossil fuel industry. I think a broader realization of the issues and realities will serve everyone better.
 

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Mining has a pretty decent record. 3 tailings dam failures in Canada in 35 yrs is pretty good. None would be better of course. You hear much more environmental issues from other resource industries, pulp and paper and oil transportation in particular. Pretty good industry in Canada that is well regarded internationally which employs a lot of people and a big part of our gdp.
I don't disagree. What I'd like to see on a global scale is a higher regulatory requirement on reclamation bonds so that there is less burden on the taxpayer should a miner go bankrupt and abandon its reclamation obligations. This applies to tailings ponds/dams, orphan O&G wells, etc. If it was done on a global scale, there would be less need for countries to bow to competitive pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What I read after months of research is that companies are supposed to be placing back whatever they took ( let's face it, a whole lot more than what we could think of in the first place) that's not a precious metal right back in the mine. Most of them never do.

According to the world Atlas, some of the mines here have been here since 1909 for BC, 15 for Manitoba, and 50 for Quebec ( it took a while for some regions to be opened for such exploration because the everybody went in the town when the industrial revolution began, creating a rural exodus of some sort- the mine mentioned is quite active today and was one of the very first to reopen after the corona craze) Canadian Provinces By Zinc Production


At least the technology improves each year. Can't find the other article regarding this yet recently a California University opened a new perspective by arranging a technology where the waste could also be used to make batteries.
 

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AltaRed, you need to relax. Miners will use electric trucks to strip the earth and haul those materials to the acid wash factories and tailing pond locations. That will save the environment. Especially in coal mining. Using electricity to remove mountains from existence. They just impede the view. After all, base materials are needed to survive. Big Oil companies are the ones ruining the environment.
 
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