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Having owned both I'd say they are a fair bit different, both have pros/cons. From a scenic perspective they are somewhat close but you still get the caged in feeling with the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Having owned both I'd say they are a fair bit different, both have pros/cons. From a scenic perspective they are somewhat close but you still get the caged in feeling with the car.
This is interesting. I felt that would be the case initially, but after more contemplation, it seems to me that the motorcycle gear such as helmet, etc would in some ways isolate the rider from the outside, similar to an astronaut's suit. That may not be the case with a bicycle or a car.
 

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How's the offroad/ enduro riding scene on the island? I took and motorbike course a few years back and went to get my license, but once I started riding single track trails in the mountains I gave up the idea of road riding. I'm not sure about the island in particular but BC has some of the best single track/ enduro riding in the world. Might be worth a look.
 

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Wearing a motorcycle helmet does remove the "wind in your hair" feeling. However, after a short while the wind (and potential noise) becomes more of an annoyance than just a nice feeling for both car and motorcycle. Also the car tends to have backdraft which pushes your hair forward over your face but there are wind screens for that. If you're travelling at very low speeds it's ok though. There is also the sunburn consideration in the car, many get caught by that. :)

It's difficult to describe the difference and not everyone gets the same thing out of riding a motorcycle. I greatly enjoy the "physics of riding", cruising along twisty lake side cottage road for example ... it's just not the same thing in a car. Most riders I know enjoy the community aspect, meeting other riders on the road and making new friends ... something else you really don't get in a car.
 

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Riding a motorcycle on back roads is like dancing. Driving a car on the same roads is like playing a video game.
That's a good way to put it.

For me a motorbike often puts me into a state of zen. It's like the fine balance of being mentally engaged and relaxed at the same time. I can get that state in a manual car on a race track but it's rare and doesn't last. It's hard to get a car to that edge that engages me that much. I've also experienced this state skiing, for the few mins before I have to stand in line again. I imagine people also find it surfing, fishing, dancing etc

I can motorbike all day and just enjoy the actual experience. In a car you need something else like music or conversation to distract you from the monotony

How's the offroad/ enduro riding scene on the island? I took and motorbike course a few years back and went to get my license, but once I started riding single track trails in the mountains I gave up the idea of road riding. I'm not sure about the island in particular but BC has some of the best single track/ enduro riding in the world. Might be worth a look.
I've also found I prefer off road riding for many reasons.

I traveled 50/50 off road across Canada few summers ago up to Prudhoe Bay and then last summer down the continental divide and back to the Atlantic. To cover this much distance it's more gravel and double track but did some more technical stuff like on the continental divide trail. My next bike will be smaller/lighter - not too small because I still want to carry gear and cover long distances in between trails.

BC, Alaska, Montana, and Colorado were the highlights. I've heard really good things about dual sport riding on the island.

 

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Riding a bike was the most fun I had with my clothes on.....until I bought a PWC. I guess I’m still a beginner on a bike (less than 10,000kms).....but I’m just not good enough to have more fun. (Own a sportbike).
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Looks like there are more than a few off road motorbike enthusiasts on CMF. Sounds enticing, but not sure I'm up to that level of adventure.
 

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Looks like there are more than a few off road motorbike enthusiasts on CMF. Sounds enticing, but not sure I'm up to that level of adventure.
There are a number of disciplines related to off-road riding ... motocross, enduro, adventure, even a few between those. Some of them have a higher physical demand on your body but the pace and difficultly are up to you so you can scale it up or down. Note that I didn't start racing off road (hare scrambles) until I was over 50 years old so don't let age stop you. The level of adventure is up to you.

BTW, they have the Grind Enduro on Vancouver Island if you want to head over to watch it.
 

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I traveled 50/50 off road across Canada few summers ago up to Prudhoe Bay and then last summer down the continental divide and back to the Atlantic. To cover this much distance it's more gravel and double track but did some more technical stuff like on the continental divide trail. My next bike will be smaller/lighter - not too small because I still want to carry gear and cover long distances in between trails.

BC, Alaska, Montana, and Colorado were the highlights. I've heard really good things about dual sport riding on the island.
That sounds like a cool trip, I may join the dual sport community one day.
 

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I still have the bike I first bought in my early twenties, a 1971 Triumph Tiger 650 in original condition. Very light and nimble, about 400 lbs, and very powerful...but my wife does not allow me to ride it...once in a while, I get dressed and drive it in circles around the parkade for half an hour...One of my retirement projects is to retrofit it into a desert rat like Steve McQueen's favourite bike...If I were to get a new bike, I'd opt for a Kawasaki KLR 650 dual-purpose, but for a new rider, the Kawa KLR 250 would be best.

66005046_359244914675548_4289045725804756992_n.jpg
 

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Nice!

I parted with my first bike, a 78 Kawasaki KZ650, a few years back, donated it to a school. It was still running but I was getting too many bikes in the stable. :)
 

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I had a bike for about 5 years of student days. Lived in warm climate and it was just transportation. 225cc James. Got me around, but a pain when it was cool or it rained. Fell off twice on slippery roads. Nobody wore helmets back then. Luckily got bikes out of my system back then.

I see lot's of guys with mid-life crises who missed out on bikes when young and now must have one! I always wanted a convertible when I was young. Eventually got one for my mid-life crisis! Still have it :)

Personally, I wouldn't advise anyone to get a bike. Lot of safety issues and Canadian drivers don't seem good at sharing road. If you have to have one, there are clubs or groups in some areas that get together for rides.
My mid-50s bike:
 

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I still have the bike I first bought in my early twenties, a 1971 Triumph Tiger 650 in original condition.
That was still quite a big bike. In student days, some guys had 650s but those like me, who just needed cheap trasnportation, would maybe have a Tiger Cub. 200cc, I think.
 
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