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Discussion Starter #1
Summer is upon us and looks like once again motorcycles are ruling the roads. One CMF member is very tempted to give it a try.

What advice do you have for someone who has never driven a motorbike but is interested in this new experience? How long would it take to get the appropriate license?

I imagine (but don't know for a fact) that I would be more comfortable with a riders bike rather than a sports bike, but would like to hear your experience.
 

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The license depends on the province.. some provinces have a graduated system that takes years and a proper road test while others just have you weave through pylons in a parking lot

Sport bikes are designed for race tracks not the street. The ergonomics and suspension are uncomfortable and dangerous on the street. The insurance costs a fortune. If you want a sporty bike at least get upright seating position for the street. I started on a sports bike

The dual sports bikes are great for Canada. Far more comfortable, suspension that handles bad roads with ease. Speed is very relative. 110kmh feels fun on a dual sport while while a race bike will not even hit the power band in 2nd

Start with the smallest cheapest bike you can. Rather invest money in the best gear you can. First few years are the most dangerous. Ride extremely defensive

 

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Discussion Starter #4
^^ This.

Do you know anyone that rides a motorcycle?
Are training courses required where you are?
I don't know anyone who rides a motorcycle that I can get help from.

I live in BC. As far as I understand there is a knowledge test for a learner's permit, then a skill test and that is it. No requirement for a course, but I doubt I can just learn by myself, so I will have to enroll in a commercial course to learn and practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Start with the smallest cheapest bike you can. Rather invest money in the best gear you can. First few years are the most dangerous. Ride extremely defensive

Those are good advice. Thank you.

Nice bike you have (and good idea to keep bear spray on you)! Is it a dirt bike or a dual sport bike?
 

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Commercial course is well worth the price and some insurance will give a discount compared to 0 years experience. You learn the basic controls but more importantly good habits and theory.

It's bigger than what most consider dual sport but I ride it on trails like a dual sport. BC has amazing roads and trails for bikes. I did Gray Creek Pass and a bunch of logging roads and highway northbound

I need to go back to BC to explore more and maybe the island
 

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I don't know anyone who rides a motorcycle that I can get help from.

I live in BC. As far as I understand there is a knowledge test for a learner's permit, then a skill test and that is it. No requirement for a course, but I doubt I can just learn by myself, so I will have to enroll in a commercial course to learn and practice.
Maybe a friend of friend knows someone .. worth a shot? Many riders are glad to help out other riders or those getting into it. I've taught a number of new riders myself over the years, from friends to complete strangers.

A commercial course is likely a good start but, since I don't know the course, it's usually far from the end. If you don't mind me asking, what city in BC are you in?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Maybe a friend of friend knows someone .. worth a shot? Many riders are glad to help out other riders or those getting into it. I've taught a number of new riders myself over the years, from friends to complete strangers.

A commercial course is likely a good start but, since I don't know the course, it's usually far from the end. If you don't mind me asking, what city in BC are you in?
I live in Victoria, but if it takes only a few sessions, I could go to Vancouver or Seattle to take it. I am just mulling it right now, so I don't have any plans yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It's bigger than what most consider dual sport but I ride it on trails like a dual sport. BC has amazing roads and trails for bikes. I did Gray Creek Pass and a bunch of logging roads and highway northbound
It looks very nice. I guess for me it would be a Harley Davidson or Indian type of bike, since I am not very adventurous.
 

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Don't buy HOG! Their market is falling off a cliff.

Lots of other cruisers or sport touring if that's your thing. Overheard H-D rider refer to gloves as "b!tch mittens" and most barely wear a real helmet.. foolish self-destructing cult

There's always rider groups around that would help you learn. You can probably find them on facebook or local sites
 

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Don't buy HOG! Their market is falling off a cliff.

Lots of other cruisers or sport touring if that's your thing. Overheard H-D rider refer to gloves as "b!tch mittens" and most barely wear a real helmet.. foolish self-destructing cult

There's always rider groups around that would help you learn. You can probably find them on facebook or local sites
Makes sense! I am not into the gangs or lifestyle, just like the way the bikes cruise.
 

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Start small, like a 250cc or less. I began riding on a Honda 90 in 1966 and that's all we had back then. Later I saw beginners buy 750s 1100s etc and get in bad trouble due to lack of experience. Trying to control a big bike when you don't know what you are doing is NOT fun.

If there are lessons available take them. Shorten the learning curve as much as possible. Buy the best helmet, leather jacket and other safety equipment you can afford. Learn to ride defensively with all your eyes about you at all times. Avoid heavy traffic especially at first. Motorcycles are as safe as you make them.

Look into the cost not just of a machine but insurance. It can be pricey especially for the expensive models.

Go out and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Makes sense to start with a smaller, simpler bike like a UJM until I learn how to adequately control a bigger bike. Also gives time to decide what exactly I will be doing with a more sophisticated one.
 

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How do you tell a happy motorcycle rider? Answer, by the bugs in his teeth.

When I will take up running/jogging as a pastime? Answer when I see one who is smiling as he runs.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
How does the motorbike experience compare to a convertible car? Not in terms of speed and acceleration (there is no match for the motorcycle), but enjoying the ambiance, the wind in your hair/face, the scenery, etc.
 

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I am thinking a two seat roadster would be the closest feeling, but still falls way short.

Have you ever considered an ATV if you are looking for off road fun ? I owned a couple and they are more stable than bikes in the bush.

I had a couple of the bigger models and they went as fast as I wanted to go.

For trails........check out Eliott Lake, Parry Sound, or the Mattawa area in Ontario.
 
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