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It is a troubled system. Canada shouldn't be extraditing people, including Canadians, without Crown prosecutors showing some evidence of crime.

It appears that if another country requests extradition, we are only too happy to hand people over. Other countries don't operate the same way.

We need a public inquiry into the extradition process.

 

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You really don't seem to be getting the message andrewf. Canada has an agreement and therefore have no choice in the matter. Canada is not drawing out the extradition process, the lawyers for Meng and the USA are doing that.

Is it that you can't see that or is it that you don't want to see that? You keep saying things like 'allowing'as if there is a choice.
The judge adjudicating the case works for the government, and determines the pace of proceedings. I don't care if the US and China/Ms. Wanzhou want to draw out the process. If typical extradition requests only take a matter of months to resolve, we should insist that this one be treated no differently.

If we are seriously talking about political intervention to either extradite or release, one would think it less dramatic an intervention to insist there be no undue delay in the process.
 

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I think that if a government can hire and pay police to beat and attack poor people, it should be simple to find a judge and a law to walk away from this extradition case.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
I think that if a government can hire and pay police to beat and attack poor people, it should be simple to find a judge and a law to walk away from this extradition case.
... in China. Sure.

The present case is the exact situation where judicial independence and the rule of law is being tested. Either we have that in Canada (and I hope we do) or else we don't, and practically everyone, not just Meng Wanzhou, could be subject to politically motivated persecution at the hands of the state, or at the hands of politically connected folks insulated from legal consequences.
 

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The extradition treaty is a mess and and an "easy go round" for countries like the US.

They know very well that Canada doesn't extradite for political reasons and there must be a crime that would also be a crime Canada.

But since, the Crown doesn't have to present any evidence, the US just makes up whatever imaginary crime fits the bill..........in both Canada and the US.

When Meng was detained, the US said it was because she violated the US embargo on Iran. When it was noted in the Canadian media that isn't a crime in Canada, the US came up with a different reason. They now claim she committed fraud against a foreign bank because she didn't advise them her employer had dealings with Iran. Seriously.........like Huawei couldn't get a loan without committing fraud ?

It is all bogus, and if we allow Meng to be extradited, we acknowledge we have no sovereign rights. We do whatever the US tells us to do.
 

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My view of the justice system was formed in 1965 when I was 16.
I pulled a prank and had to appear in court.
I had Elmer Sopha as a lawyer and he was Member of Paliament too.
My lawyer told me that if I paid 300 bucks to the judge he would walk away from the case.
And I happily paid the 300 bucks.
 

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My view of the justice system was formed in 1965 when I was 16.
I pulled a prank and had to appear in court.
I had Elmer Sopha as a lawyer and he was Member of Paliament too.
My lawyer told me that if I paid 300 bucks to the judge he would walk away from the case.
And I happily paid the 300 bucks.
I am only now finding out about corruption in the Canadian judiciary, thanks to calm.

A bit surprising that calm now feels it appropriate to come forward and to admit to the Criminal Code offence of offering a bribe to an "officer". That's a rather heavy duty offence. Not sure it's something about which to boast on a public forum.

I am also impressed that calm was a well-heeled 16-year old. $300 in 1965, according to the BoC inflation calculator, is the equivalent of $2,445 today. Probably would have been a lot cheaper to simply plead guilty to an offence under provincial legislation (such as the Offence Act in B.C.) and pay a fine of $20 or so in those days.
 

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The minister of justice has the authority to do what is effectively a prisoner swap that would benefit Canadians. That is part of the legal process too, even though it is not apolitical.

We actually do not know for a fact that the Canadians have not committed espionage. There is a possibility that they have, in which case it would be a significant offence from China's point of view. Certainly they could have done more harm to China than Meng has done to Canada. We don't know.

I don't care if Meng falsified some documents related to US sanctions. I am sure the US does a lot of that too. A good course of action would be for Canada to put Meng on a plane from YVR heading east. Once the plane clears Canadian airspace, then I couldn't care less if USAF F-16s intercept it, land it in SEA-TAC, and do what they want with Meng.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
The extradition treaty is a mess and and an "easy go round" for countries like the US.
I agree that the American's don't seem to take it seriously. But why would they? Theirs is the ultimate, truest form of justice of which all other nations have a more or less inferior facsimile, if indeed any justice at all.

Anyway, after randomly finding it in googling, I am very interested in how the Anne Sacoolas case plays out. I would think with the American's wanting Julian Assange from the UK very badly indeed, they would have an incentive to attempt to give at least the outward appearance of fair reciprocity. But they are immune to irony.
 
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