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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

So I discovered there is a tax credit for medical expenses: http://www.taxtips.ca/filing/eligiblemedicalexpenses.htm

This year I received orthodontics that cost a few thousand dollars. It was mainly for cosmetic purposes. The link says the ITA is changing in 2010 so that it is clear that purely cosmetic procedures aren't eligible but it also says that orthodontics are eligible.

The ITA simply includes this as a medical expenses:

"(a) [paid] to a medical practitioner, dentist or nurse or a public or licensed private hospital in respect of medical or dental services provided to a person (in this subsection referred to as the “patient”) who is the individual..."

There is nothing else about orthodontics that I could find.

Would claiming this for a deduction be tenuous?

Thanks.
 

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Lucky those expenses are in the past! The ITA is clear: qualifying medical expenses include those paid to a dentist. There is no further qualification about "cosmetic dentistry."

The changes to the ITA, if they come into effect, will apply to expenses incurred after March 4. So even if the law is changed, sounds like the changes won't apply to you.

If you want to read the CRA bulletin, it is here.
 

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Okay thanks. One more question. In relation to said orthodontics, I also submitted a questionable claim for insurance a couple weeks ago. Apparently my insurance covers orthodontics after a recent change in the policy, however, although my treatment started before the change in policy I made a payment after the change in policy. So it might be accepted and it might be denied. If I get reimbursed I assume I will no longer be eligible for a portion of the tax receipt. How do I rectify this if this ends up being the case?
 

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You file an adjustment to your tax return, using the T1ADJ form. Or, you could wait and see about the insurance claim before you file your taxes. :D (those are your teeth after orthodontics)
 

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First of all, I'm in a similar situation. Last year I spent a few thousand on some dental work and recently I was able to claim those expenses on my 2009 tax. It wasn't much of a deduction though, because CRA takes a percentage of the dollars you spent on the work, and then deducts that net amount from your income. It doesn't seem to make as much of a difference in your income (and thus refund) as would an RRSP contribution which is deducted from income dollar for dollar.

Secondly, this is ambiguous. My dentist did SOME of the dental work but not all. The lion's share had to be done by a surgeon. Am I understanding this thread right...the expenses submitted to the surgeon are no longer deductible on procedures performed as of this month??

I wonder if dental surgeons are considered medical practioners. The answer to that probably contains the answer to the original question.
 

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RM:

Yes, this is the distinction between a tax deduction and a tax credit.

Also, dental surgeons are qualified medical practitioners for the purposes of the medical expense tax credit.
 

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Yes my teeth are practically perfect now. But they were pretty good to begin with I'm jsut picky. :D Thanks for the help.

Anyway, I am pretty sure this was a tax credit, i.e. you take 15% of your expense and you get that returned. So if you spend $1000 you should get an extra $150 on your return. Pretty good if you ask me.

BTW, a surgeon would be a medical practitioner-i.e. a doctor.
 
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