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^ You can SYH and ROTFL all you want but this primitive language does help you decipher medical reports that may need to read. I get YKR, lol.

AAMOI, does "engineering" not require a deeper language to understand other than all mathematical symbols and physics-related stats, plus English?
 

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Most fields have some kind of jargon. Even companies have a lot of jargon. My employer uses terms in some ways out of step with the rest of the industry, which gets complicated when dealing with other companies, or even to translate between departments. I find myself playing the role of translating one set of jargon to another and keeping an eye out for misunderstandings or when people are talking past each other.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Most fields have some kind of jargon. Even companies have a lot of jargon. My employer uses terms in some ways out of step with the rest of the industry, which gets complicated when dealing with other companies, or even to translate between departments. I find myself playing the role of translating one set of jargon to another and keeping an eye out for misunderstandings or when people are talking past each other.
In my sales career I found that many people I had to deal with firmly believed that you couldn't understand their business unless you had worked in their business. That is simply not true. All businesses are made up of people and all follow the same basic equation of price minus cost equals profit, etc. Businesses are far more alike than they are different from one another. But you can't tell people that and have them believe it.

So one answer is to learn their 'jargon'. I found that if you could use a dozen specific jargon words or phrases correctly in context, then the people you were talking to would believe you knew what you were talking about. It was amusing really. I was only applying common principles of business to their specific business but by using a few words of their jargon in doing that, they accepted that I understood their business.

Jargon can be useful sometimes but it can also be useless when trying to communicate with people who are 'outside the loop'. I find that some people don't seem to be smart enough to realize that they are in fact not getting their point across when they use jargon the other person is not familiar with.
 

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Depends on whether you are talking at a very high level about business models or you are talking about detailed business processes. In some situations you can gloss over the business processes.

My experience with management consultants is that they are often kind of clueless, even about basic common-sense stuff that is not company specific. It also becomes obvious that they are experts in feeding your own opinions and analytics back to you. They are very useful for creating slick presentations for the board. Maybe the partner or engagement lead is fine, but the grunts that make up the bulk of the billable hours are decidedly mixed. Frankly it feels like, as the client, we are educating these guys as a bizarre MBA coop program.

Jargon has a place, mainly when a team is communicating with each other and trying to say things precisely or convey specific ideas quickly (when you have sentences where half the words are acronyms).
 
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