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Discussion Starter #1
I am not a fan of Airbnb at all and one 'silver lining' I see coming out of the pandemic is the impact on that business the virus is having. All those who have bought condos etc. with the sole intention of renting them out by the night without any regard for how residents in a building feel about that or how it impacts the long term market, are now in trouble. With little or no income and a mortgage still to pay, they are hurting big time. That's what I call getting their just deserts.

 

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That's also my issue with Air BnB... the lack of regulation and quality control is actually hilarious. The landlord is king and anyone else involved with the rental is a peasant
 

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^ Yes, that was a big headline. And no, LTA didn't make a typo .. he meant "desert" as harsh as the Sahara. AirBnB particpants got what they deserved ... only worst ... turning some into brothels where legit tenants can't live in peace.
 

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^ Yes, that was a big headline. And no, LTA didn't make a typo .. he meant "desert" as harsh as the Sahara. AirBnB particpants got what they deserved ... only worst ... turning some into brothels where legit tenants can't live in peace.
Umm, the word 'desert' as in the Sahara, is pronounced 'dez-ert' while 'desert' as in 'just deserts' is pronounced the same way that 'dessert' meaning the last sweet course in a meal and is pronounced 'dih-zurt'. So nope, I don't mean a desert such as the Sahara, I meant 'desert' as in a different meaning and pronunciation even though the spelling is the same.

Good explanation here: Is It "Just Deserts" Or "Just Desserts"?
 

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Umm, that would have been desserts with 2 S's jargey3000. There should have been no confusion in your mind at all.
no confusion....just trying to make a "funny"...I see It was a wasted effort...sigh...
Surprised you didn't criticize (or notice?) my spelling ( intentional BTW)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This word 'desert' is a prime example of why English is one of the hardest languages in the world to learn. Not only do we have desert and dessert which are spelled and pronounced differently but the first can also be pronounced like the second and have an entirely different meaning.

When I was living in Greece, it came as a surprise to me that every letter in the Greek alphabet can only be pronounced in one way. So if you learn the alphabet, you can pronounce any word you see even if you do not know what the word means. You could correctly read out loud an entire page of writing without understanding a single word. LOL
 

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When I was living in Greece, it came as a surprise to me that every letter in the Greek alphabet can only be pronounced in one way. So if you learn the alphabet, you can pronounce any word you see even if you do not know what the word means. You could correctly read out loud an entire page of writing without understanding a single word. LOL
That's the advantage of using an alphabet designed specifically for one language.
The latin alphabet is used by so many languages, including English, but it was designed for a language that doesn't exist any more.
 

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...
The latin alphabet is used by so many languages, including English, but it was designed for a language that doesn't exist any more.
I would not say that Latin doesn't exist any more. I was a student of the language in Toronto from Grades 9 through 13. It comes in handy when I drop by to see the Pope on visits to the Vatican. My Italian is weak. An impoverished vocabulary of swear words.
 

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@Mukhang pera I had thought Latin was pretty much dead. I heard of my oldest sibling have Latin as an option (he is in his 60') but neither my middle sibling or myself ever had that option or knew of any school that offered it. Then the strangest thing this summer is one of the summer camps were looking at for my kids had changed to an on line model and has brand NEW offering of Latin camp. I thought it might have been a camp to learn about Latin culture or something, nope, it's to learn the language. My kid wants to take it as she wants to learn other languages. Latin was not something I expected my kids to ever learn.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
@Mukhang pera I had thought Latin was pretty much dead. I heard of my oldest sibling have Latin as an option (he is in his 60') but neither my middle sibling or myself ever had that option or knew of any school that offered it. Then the strangest thing this summer is one of the summer camps were looking at for my kids had changed to an on line model and has brand NEW offering of Latin camp. I thought it might have been a camp to learn about Latin culture or something, nope, it's to learn the language. My kid wants to take it as she wants to learn other languages. Latin was not something I expected my kids to ever learn.
It was in fact a mandatory course when I was in High School in Toronto. The name of the textbook was, 'Living Latin' which I found amusing but when I laughed about it, my Latin teacher gave me a detention.

Latin is a 'dead' language in that it is no longer spoken by any group of people as an everyday language. Romansch which is still a living language spoken by a small segment of the population of Switzerland as their everyday language is partly a derivative of latin. Even then though only a small number of the words are actually latin.
).
That's probably about as close as you can get to latin as a living language.
 

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Plugging Along, I don't think your kid will regret studying Latin. So much of English and other languages is derived from it. I have found it useful throughout life.

I took Latin mainly because, at the time, there was a lot more Latin used by the legal profession. That has (sadly) faded out to a significant degree. For some silly reason, those running the show here in BC decided, starting some years ago, that "jargon" (which includes Latin) should be eradicated from the legal profession. I don't know why lawyers have had to abandon a tradition of Latin use going back centuries. I have not noticed other occupations or professions following suit. Medicine remains replete with its own jargon (including no shortage of Latin), and unashamedly so. And how about technology - computers, etc.? I see no movement there to do away with techno geek language.
 

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It was in fact a mandatory course when I was in High School in Toronto. The name of the textbook was, 'Living Latin' which I found amusing but when I laughed about it, my Latin teacher gave me a detention.
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Latin is a 'dead' language in that it is no longer spoken by any group of people as an everyday language. Romansch which is still a living language spoken by a small segment of the population of Switzerland as their everyday language is partly a derivative of latin. Even then though only a small number of the words are actually latin.
).
That's probably about as close as you can get to latin as a living language.
I recall my Grade 9 Latin textbook as 'Living Latin'. In keeping with my Grade 9 French textbook, 'Le Français Vivant'. Although the books were school property, that did not hold us back from writing on them witticisms such as "Closed evenings and weekends" and "In case of starvation, eat this book; it's full of baloney." And of Latin we used to say: "Latin is a dead language, as dead as dead can be. Once it killed the Romans, now it's killing me."
 

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Plugging Along, I don't think your kid will regret studying Latin. So much of English and other languages is derived from it. I have found it useful throughout life.

I took Latin mainly because, at the time, there was a lot more Latin used by the legal profession. That has (sadly) faded out to a significant degree. For some silly reason, those running the show here in BC decided, starting some years ago, that "jargon" (which includes Latin) should be eradicated from the legal profession. I don't know why lawyers have had to abandon a tradition of Latin use going back centuries. I have not noticed other occupations or professions following suit. Medicine remains replete with its own jargon (including no shortage of Latin), and unashamedly so. And how about technology - computers, etc.? I see no movement there to do away with techno geek language.
... and one of my favourite teacher in high-school was the Latin teacher. Junior school was the French teacher. Both made the languages (voluntary) easy to learn despite disliking the odd-ball English subjects (not the language/grammar itself but those stupid mandatory novels that you don't agree with. I didn't mind Shakespeare though.).
 

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Discussion Starter #19
... and one of my favourite teacher in high-school was the Latin teacher. Junior school was the French teacher. Both made the languages (voluntary) easy to learn despite disliking the odd-ball English subjects (not the language/grammar itself but those stupid mandatory novels that you don't agree with. I didn't mind Shakespeare though.).
To further add to my amusement in taking Latin, our Living Latin textbook was enhanced by the name of our Latin teacher, Mr. Hope. I kid you not. As a lover of Latin I suppose he 'lived in hope' of the language being revived. LOL
 

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^ No need to "revive" a century(?) old language that already existed ... maybe not the lingo of the day or year ... like LOL. [Ha ha]
 
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