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I am a pet lover. I have two pets. I am mulling over the option of investing in the safety of my pets. I have had a very bad experience two years back when my pet had to suffer gruesome attack from buglars. I am planning to go with video surveillance in my premises. I already have one installed in my house. I researched a lot in this regard. Some articles suggest pet sensors and automatic door locks ( http://www.apialarm.com/blog/keeping-pets-safe/keep-pet-safe-thieves/ ). Are pet sensors available with alarm security systems ? Need valuable guidance. Thanks a lot.
 

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I am a pet lover. I have two pets. I am mulling over the option of investing in the safety of my pets. I have had a very bad experience two years back when my pet had to suffer gruesome attack from buglars. I am planning to go with video surveillance in my premises. I already have one installed in my house. I researched a lot in this regard. Some articles suggest pet sensors and automatic door locks ( http://www.apialarm.com/blog/keeping-pets-safe/keep-pet-safe-thieves/ ). Are pet sensors available with alarm security systems ? Need valuable guidance. Thanks a lot.
If you have security cameras already, the camera in itself will not signal the alarm company that a home invasion is happening, only the
detection of something by a motion sensor which works off a narrow "range of view" to detect infrared body heat of the human (or pet) crossing it's scan threshold and scan range as the case may be.

The problem with "pet friendly"sensors is that pets could still manage to set them off.

If it's an automatic system, the alarm system will call the alarm company, which could send police to your premises to find out it may have been a false alarm.
Motion detectors in the house to foil B&E theives may or may not detect the movement of the pets inside the house, so it's not a fool proof system, even if the pet (as claimed in this ad) is under 60lbs.

A small dog or cat is typically under 20lbs, so if the motion detectors in the
rooms are reduced in sensitivity, that may also compromise their effectness....just saying.

Pet sensors

A lot of people avoid including motion sensors as a part of their home security out of fear that their pets will set it off, but many home security systems now include pet-friendly sensors designed not to go off whenever an animal weighing about 60 pounds or less walks by. For instance, If you have cats or small dogs, they won’t set off the alarm.
but again these pet friendlys sensors are not foolproof in every case (read this)

http://www.onesourcesecurity.com/portal25/one-source-security-blog/entry/do-pet-friendly-motion-detectors-really-work
Also, you may want to stay away from a situation where your pet is at the top of the range of the pet friendly motion detector you’re having installed. For example, if you have a 75-pound dog, you may run into some issues if you’re installing an 80-pound motion detector.

In conclusion, if you’ve got large pets, then it can’t hurt to invest in pet friendly motion detectors. As previously mentioned, they do work in many cases but there are issues to be aware of.
 

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In the Ol' days, alarms used land lines. Very simple to defeat, A burglar just went to the nearest telephone pole and cut every line he saw.

The cops would turn up and if they did not see any sign of entry they just left. Burglars just sat in the bushes til the cops left and then committed the crime.

If I was to set up an alarm again, I would include a yellow (small dome type) tow truck light on my roof top and have it connected to the motion detectors. All your neighbours would know you need help.
 
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