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Sorry, I had no idea you were responding to Sags. I don't know why members respond to Sags or why he posts here. I think his time would be better spent with Jerry Dias and his colleagues.

I have seen enough stuff from twitter, youtube, podcasts et al to know that most of this is click bait opinion from armchair quarterbacks with minimal to no credentials. The signal to noise ratio appears to be really low. Nor is anything from the cable channels worth watching. I couldn't tell you the last time I found CNBC online nor do I watch any of this stuff on TV. I do read business materials from The Economist, and sometimes certain writers from the G&M and Financial Post every few days or so.
Do you pay anything for economist? I know how to get by the paywall but the extra few clicks is usually annoying enough

It's interesting that sags is starting to think a the storm is coming now but didn't see it coming last year. CNBC is basically leading retail to financial slaughter. Jim Cramer was yelling buy netflix this year when all my podcasts types were well aware since last year the fed could stop the music any moment. Markets can actually move up when news is not as bad as expected. Reverse sell the news

There's a clip somewhere that shows how all the mainstream media are just following a controlled narrative

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I am a subscriber to The Economist. I don't have a problem paying for subscriptions that provide informative value to me in a number of ways. That includes things like Spotify for all my devices including vehicles, etc, etc. We all have our preferred list of things meaningful to ourselves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #944 ·
The Economist is a great read as it focuses more on facts and potential outcomes than making predictions to suit a narrative. I read the Globe and Mail occasionally but find it to be more for entertainment than value. Same with the Financial post and Wall Street Journal. I've already posted about the value of Canadian Money Saver in the BNN guest thread. IMO it probably gives the best information for those who DIY. It uses plain clear language but dives a bit deeper than fire your advisor, go couch potato and only invest in vanilla ETFs. As Alta mentioned we all have our preferred lists which is why all these media outlets exist. I do follow a few podcasts but have to compete with the rest of my house for screen time. I guess that is why I still gravitate to text over video.
 

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I am almost exclusively text driven. I find videos wanting at the best of times.Too much garbage to filter through in the process. With reading, I can be selective in any article.
 

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I do follow a few podcasts but have to compete with the rest of my house for screen time. I guess that is why I still gravitate to text over video.
I didn't even know podcasts were video form for a long time

They were originally mp3 audio that you subscribed to and loaded on your ipod to listen to while out and about. I still use them this way except on my watch/phone. They download and clear automatically and I set them to not use mobile data as I rarely need mobile data

They're too dry to watch but perfect for listening while doing something else
 

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Discussion Starter · #947 ·
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source: Resolve Asset Management

This graphic shows what assets perform well in 4 different environments. One can see that the real estate and equity returns we have saw in the past are because of lowrates and low inflation. Also, as most understand cash is going to lose even more in an inflationary environment. Fears of a recession have taken some of the momentum out of commodities while rate hikes have caused a correction in real estate. The part that I find interesting about the graphic is that there is little difference between low economic growth inflationary periods and inflationary booms. I would much prefer an inflationary boom even though I have more cash on hand to act as a buffer for fear of recession. If we are heading into a period of high inflation and accelerating growth as some are predicting I should have less cash. I guess I would prefer to the added security to pay for "emergencies" that are going up in price. I don't believe we have seen the bottom but would be happy if that was it. Come Q4 we should have a better idea and I will likely be looking at putting some cash into REITs and NA equities with international operations.
 

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I don't believe we have seen the bottom but would be happy if that was it. Come Q4 we should have a better idea and I will likely be looking at putting some cash into REITs and NA equities with international operations.
Depends what the grayhairs at the Fed decide

Fed prints fiat everything goes up. Fed tightens everything goes down. Fed has a lot of tightening left to do even after rate hikes. Just watch for the grayhairs to pivot if the political situation gets too bad from unemployment or economic stress. In China they have tanks on the streets now in front of banks due to riots over the economy.

Don't fight the garyhairs. I think we could see a "bullwhip" effect if they have to pivot
 

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The in-laws had a 5,000 acre wheat and calf farm in Saskatchewan.

They didn’t buy 2 bales of hay from the local market and carry them home in the trunk of a Nissan.

They grew and cut their own feedstock, and stored it. They cut hay from the sides of roads.

Posting this person as a typical “rancher” to prove people wont be able to afford food only proves you are easily manipulated.
 

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We stockpile all the sales and our food inflation is not enough to worry about.

Even if steak cost too much….we would eat beans….we are very adaptable to whatever is affordable.

That is how both of us grew up.
 

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The in-laws had a 5,000 acre wheat and calf farm in Saskatchewan.

They didn’t buy 2 bales of hay from the local market and carry them home in the trunk of a Nissan.

They grew and cut their own feedstock, and stored it. They cut hay from the sides of roads.

Posting this person as a typical “rancher” to prove people wont be able to afford food only proves you are easily manipulated.
So basically you have no awareness of what happens to livestock when feed price increase. The impacts can last for years

This example far for saggy brains from Toronto but was still too complicated I guess. The reason the price of feed and hay is up saggy brains is because the cost to produce it is up. I wouldn't expect you to understand when you though inflation was good for GICs

You have no idea how typical farmers live you chickened out from moving west
 

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We are happy to collect higher interest on savings and cola increases, because they exceed our inflation costs.

That is a concept you struggle with because you incorrectly believe all of our income is reduced by the rate of inflation.

That isn’t how it works, unless you ARE spending all your income on necessities and inflation affects all your income.

Ask forum members how much inflation is actually costing them relative to their overall income.
 

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We are happy to collect higher interest on savings and cola increases, because they exceed our inflation costs.
Cola that comes from the government and taxpayer eh saggy man

This is why governments should not bail out failed companies such as GM. It creates delusional boomers

It is YOU who thinks that money grows on trees
 

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Input costs for growing feedstock is nowhere near what that woman quoted.

If it was, pasture land would be worth a lot more than it is.

A woman driving 2 bales of hay in the trunk of her car…..isn’t a “rancher”…..lol
 

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CPP has nothing to do with the government, nor does company pensions.
What would happen to GM company pensions if the government didn't bail them out

CPP is also organized by the government even if it is funded separated. It was established by the government and can be changed by the government

saggy brains thinks cola and pensions are magic money trees
 

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They are the returns on invested contributions.

You should stop hanging around crypto and Reddit WSB forums.

Try CNBC to learn what the CEOs, best fund managers, top analysts, and Government officials are saying about the real world.
 

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Try CNBC to learn what the CEOs, best fund managers, top analysts, and Government officials are saying about the real world.
Just imagine the kind of person who watches Jim Cramer

CNBC's audience are not real traders they are saggy boomers
 

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Yet government gives itself credit for CPP when 'calculating' their net debt, which they then compare to rest of the worlds' gross debt, making uneducated people think we aren't one of most indebted countries in entire world.

Just to make sure food prices get even higher, they will artificially limit fertilizer use. Starvation is official platform I guess
 
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