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I seem to remember a flood of used pickup trucks on the market around 2009
Pretty sure that would correlate much stronger with jobs than inflation.
I drive a truck - is it because I prefer it over Toyota Yaris? No. It is because once a week I need to haul tools, sometimes pumps, etc. - it is a necessity. No matter how expensive the gas, I will not be driving Toyota Yaris until my work requires me to drive a truck. It is as simple as that.
I imagine a lot of engineers, trades, farmers, laborers, delivery drivers, etc. have no option of having smaller car - that's why gasoline is a necessity for significant portion of population
 

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Pretty sure that would correlate much stronger with jobs than inflation.
I drive a truck - is it because I prefer it over Toyota Yaris? No. It is because once a week I need to haul tools, sometimes pumps, etc. - it is a necessity. No matter how expensive the gas, I will not be driving Toyota Yaris until my work requires me to drive a truck. It is as simple as that.
I imagine a lot of engineers, trades, farmers, laborers, delivery drivers, etc. have no option of having smaller car - that's why gasoline is a necessity for significant portion of population
I suppose.

I remember people saying it was the high gas prices but could be the jobs. A colleague at the time commuted in a truck to his office. He sold it because of gas

I see a lot of pickups especially in the US that have never hauled more than a few Ikea boxes or beach chairs
 

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Top CEOs in Canada were paid at second-highest level ever during the pandemic

The Canadian Press, Erika Ibrahim, January 4, 2022

...

In 2020, as many Canadians had hours cut or lost their jobs completely during repeated lockdowns and forced closures, the highest-paid 100 CEOs at publicly traded companies earned an average of $10.9 million.

That was down from the record high of $11.8 million in 2018, but an increase of $95,000 compared with 2019.

Macdonald said that CEOs receiving the second-highest pay on record is “quite an achievement” given that the pandemic was quite damaging to many of the companies they were running.

More than 82 per cent of the average came through bonuses including cash or stock options, which Macdonald said companies creatively calculated to ensure poor performance during the pandemic didn’t affect CEO pay.


“This only happens in bad times,” said Macdonald. “When things go badly for the company, CEOs are protected in many cases. When things go well for the company, the sky’s the limit.”

...
... what bank CEOs are saying here is "inflation is a worry for the little people".
 

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Are you sure?

Many small vehicles aren't rated for towing in Canada, or have low capacities.
This seems to be a bit more recent change.
 

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Australia is a different country.
Most cars in Canada have VERY limited towing.
 

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700lbs is a light utility or similar trailer, or a small pop-up tent trailer perhaps.
In the UK the current 1.3L Gas Auto 5-Door Yaris is rated at 880 kg or 1936 lb towing.
My buddy towed about 1000 lbs of boat and trailer with his Yaris, no problems at all. Legally you can tow between 2 and 3k unbraked with any car in most provinces and states.
And in Canada Yaris is 1.5 L gas
 

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It is the same 1.5 litre engine. No one is going to weigh how much you tow. This is Canada. You tow what you can.
If the vehicle isn't rated for towing, it can void your warranty.

I'd also be curious if you get in an accident, what would insurance say, is it inappropriate usage to use a vehicle in way that is not approved by the manufacturer?
 

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One can only do legally what the vehicle is rated for, in the jurisdiction that it is in. In Canada, the Yaris is rated for 700lbs per Toyota Canada. Clear as water. No value in arguing anything differently. Shall we continue to derail this thread?
 

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No value in arguing anything differently. Shall we continue to derail this thread?
Now now, we haven't even begun on whether or not the tools that need to be hauled would fit in the back of a Yaris. Given that I've seen a guy collect my 60 gallon water heater with his honda fit, I vote yes. I've also seen him collect a washing machine. People's "needs" are often largely inflated ( <-- see there, we're on topic ) by marketing.
 

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One can only do legally what the vehicle is rated for, in the jurisdiction that it is in. In Canada, the Yaris is rated for 700lbs per Toyota Canada. Clear as water. No value in arguing anything differently. Shall we continue to derail this thread?
Funny enough.
Here's an article about towing (written by an xB owner) - it even mentions the Yaris. Look at the rest of the world, and read this. Then decide...


The Great American Anti-Towing Conspiracy
By Paul Niedermeyer
February 23, 2008 -

“Scion does not recommend towing a trailer… your vehicle was not designed for towing." Welcome to the great American anti-towing conspiracy. Manufacturers of anything less than a big SUV or pick-up are trying to take away our God-given right to tow with our cars. For a guy who’s towed everything from a Radio Flyer wagon behind a pedal-powered John Deere sidewalk tractor, to a three-bedroom house, I feel like I’m being singled out. Of course, there’s a possibility that I’m the cause as well as the target of this jihad. A lot of lawyers do drive the Ventura Freeway, and one of them may well have seen my spectacular stunt with a trailer.

Before I recount the creative maneuver with which I simultaneously occupied all four lanes of “the world’s busiest freeway” at sixty-five mph, let’s look at the prejudice American would-be towers are up against …

On Toyota’s UK website, the Yaris is credited with a towing capacity of 1050kg/2315lbs. That’s right in line with the old rule of thumb that a car can safely tow an amount equal to its own weight.

But here in the land of the (not so) free, the Yaris’ owner’s manual admonishes: “Toyota does not recommend towing a trailer with your vehicle.” The unnamed author goes on to give a partial pass to our northern neighbors: “In Canada only, total weight of cargo and trailer not to exceed 700lbs.” Please leave your trailers at the border? Perhaps this partial exemption reflects Canada’s status as being somewhere between English and American. But the logic is lost on me.

Maybe it’s a blatant tactic by Toyota to meet Tundra sales goals, by forcing us tow-heads into buying that over-achieving tug (rated for 10,000+lbs). But Honda is in on the conspiracy too. The CRV weighs 3600lbs and offers 166hp, about the same as an old gen Explorer. In Europe, where folks often buy CUV’s specifically for their towing capacity, the CRV is rated to tow 2000kg/4400lbs. And in the tow-aphobic US? A measly 1500lbs!

It wasn’t always like this. In the sixties, you’d see 40hp VW Beetles pulling a trailer. In 1976, my VW Beetle died in Ohio heading back to Iowa, so we left it and hitch-hiked the rest of the way. My girlfriend’s Mom was driving a 70hp Corolla, which was rated to tow 1800lbs, exactly the weight of my VW. She generously offered it. Towing the Bug home, the Corolla never broke a sweat.

Which I can’t say for myself when I nearly shut down the 101.

It was 1986. We had just bought our first house, in Woodland Hills. I rented a big double-axle twelve-foot trailer to haul debris and junk to the dump. My Mexican helper was a zealous worker, loading lots of broken concrete into the back end of the trailer. I remember glancing at the warning sign about having 60 percent of the weight ahead of the axles. But any fleeting thought of relevancy or concern was quickly overpowered by the testosterone-fueled urge to PULL!

That trailer must have weighed about three times as much as the Jeep Cherokee tug. I managed to squeeze into the perpetually crowded Ventura freeway.

When our rig (finally) hit 65 in the right lane, the trailer began oscillating, which escalated exponentially. The next thing I knew, the Jeep was being swung wildly from side to side, like the tail on a dog. One moment, we were facing towards the shoulder, then across all the lanes facing the center divider. The Jeep was utterly out of control; there was nothing to do but hang on for dear life, waiting for the fishtailing trailer to roll and/or get creamed by the four lanes of traffic behind us.

Fortunately, the other drivers (and that corporate attorney) were on the ball and held back, in awe of our mad gyrations. When enough speed was scrubbed off and stability resumed, we found ourselves in the narrow left shoulder, where we sat bathed in sweat.

I had no choice but to steel myself, get back in the traffic, and fight my way across four lanes while keeping the speed below fifty. When we finally pulled off on the right shoulder, my ashen-faced helper tumbled out, got on his knees and crossed himself, before we started re-arranging the trailer’s load.

Having learned that cardinal lesson of towing, I’m a hair more cautious now. But I still believe that cars, by their nature, are “designed for towing.” So I always carry a tow rope in the old Ford pick-up instead of an AAA card. More than once, Stephanie has schlepped me home with the Forester. I don’t even want to know what its tow rating is; it’s survived just fine. And I’ve found an after-market hitch for the xB, rated for 2000lbs.
 

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Lol…..good luck when the trailer starts to sway. Seen a few trailers overturned in the ditch over the years.

There is more to it than engine size or vehicle weight….like the frame, tranny,radiator, brakes, hills, wind.

I doubt that rig would be able to chug through northern Ontario.
 

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Discussion Starter · #780 ·
It is the same 1.5 litre engine. No one is going to weigh how much you tow. This is Canada. You tow what you can.
I see all kinds of vehicles pulled over out west in the summer months for towing a camper or trailer with their cars. All you have to do is spend a bit of time on the Trans-Canada Highway system to know that statement is not accurate. Possibly in more remote areas that may not be the case but it is dangerous to live in absolutes. As someone whose company involves weekly transportation of materials on flatbed trailers we were constantly being stopped for inspection. Perhaps it is different in other parts of the country.
 
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