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Yikes my wife and I flew on that exact plane (same flight at least, quite possibly the same plane).

Good thing there were no fatalities. And fortunately it didn't happen 1000 miles out in the Pacific
 

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Wow. Landed safely, no injuries.


 

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Can one of our resident pilots @Flugzeug or @Suzuki12 or @Fisherman30 comment?

And this was shortly after takeoff to Hawaii. The plane is totally full of fuel! How do they do an emergency landing with engine failure in that situation... do they dump the fuel as fast as possible (all over the neighbourhoods) or do they actually land with all the fuel?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Can one of our resident pilots @Flugzeug or @Suzuki12 or @Fisherman30 comment?

And this was shortly after takeoff to Hawaii. The plane is totally full of fuel! How do they do an emergency landing with engine failure in that situation... do they dump the fuel as fast as possible (all over the neighbourhoods) or do they actually land with all the fuel?
I would think they dump. But interested to know For sure.
 

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I would think they dump. But interested to know For sure.
I think it takes a long time to dump that much fuel, doesn't it? I thought 30 to 60 minutes to fully dump.

In this situation they have to land ASAP as the engine is flying apart before their eyes
 

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This article claims it happened in 2018 AND 2016. Same airline and aircraft model 777-200.
Ok but you'd have to look at statistics on rate of engine failure for all major aircrafts, and compare the (normalized) failure rates, to see if there's anything unusual going on with this specific plane.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think it takes a long time to dump that much fuel, doesn't it? I thought 30 to 60 minutes to fully dump.

In this situation they have to land ASAP as the engine is flying apart before their eyes
Ya, I’m not sure how long this flight actually was. They need to get below their max landing weight. Although, I’ve read they could still land if above that weight but the plane would need inspection on landing before flying again. Pretty moot in this case. I guess it partly depends ont he take off weight. But as I said, I’m curious to know if they dumped here. And if they didn’t dump, how much of a challenge/risk is the landing.

B777-200.
Maximum take off weight: 545,000 lb / 247,200 kg
Maximum landing weight: 445,000 lb / 201,840 kg
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok but you'd have to look at statistics on rate of engine failure for all major aircrafts, and compare the (normalized) failure rates, to see if there's anything unusual going on with this specific plane.
Few more here. Seems like a lot of similar incidents, but I’m the farthest thing from an expert.

Other notable accidents and incidents include British Airways Flight 2276, a 777-200ER that aborted takeoff at Las Vegas McCarran International Airport on September 8, 2015 after a serious uncontained engine failure punctured 'multiple' holes in the engine case and caused severe fire damage to the outer skin of the forward fuselage, all crew and passengers evacuating with only minor injuries occurring;[278][279][280][281] Korean Air Flight 2708, a 777-300 that suffered an engine fire prior to takeoff at Tokyo International Airport, with all aboard evacuating safely;[282][283][284] and Singapore Airlines Flight 368, a 777-300ER whose right engine and nearby area of wing caught fire after an emergency landing at Singapore Changi Airport, due to an engine oil leak, with no injuries
 

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Can one of our resident pilots @Flugzeug or @Suzuki12 or @Fisherman30 comment?

And this was shortly after takeoff to Hawaii. The plane is totally full of fuel! How do they do an emergency landing with engine failure in that situation... do they dump the fuel as fast as possible (all over the neighbourhoods) or do they actually land with all the fuel?
I don’t know a lot about this specific situation so I won’t comment on it other than to say they did a great job.

Each scenario can be a little bit different. If they need to return for a landing shortly after departure for a non-time sensitive issue then they would consider dumping fuel, which can take a while depending on the amount they need/want to dump. This would be done in a designated area, at a designated altitude (to aid in fuel evaporation rather than have it cover the ground) with the LAT/LONG noted for environmental tracking reasons.

If there is a time sensitive issue, such as a fire (particularly a fire that will not extinguish), getting the aircraft on the ground in a safe and timely manner is the concern, not dumping fuel.

As someone mentioned, Landing overweight would require an inspection afterwards.

Engine Failures/Fires followed by an emergency landing, as well as landing overweight, are very commonly trained events for airline pilots.

Great job to the crew.
 

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Makes you wonder what good is the pilot's pre-flight inspection if maintenance couldn't find this kind of thing.
 

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Dumping fuel vapor near a burning engine would be a bad idea.

We had designated fuel dumping areas but never saw them used. Apparently dumping fuel was more common before - maybe a combination of aircraft improvements and environmental standards over time

We had fumes onboard a few times after takeoff and I don't recall dumping fuel
 

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Can one of our resident pilots @Flugzeug or @Suzuki12 or @Fisherman30 comment?

And this was shortly after takeoff to Hawaii. The plane is totally full of fuel! How do they do an emergency landing with engine failure in that situation... do they dump the fuel as fast as possible (all over the neighbourhoods) or do they actually land with all the fuel?

I don't really know any details about what happened, but would just echo what Flugzeug said. Great job to the crew! These are the sorts of things where folks should be thankful to have an experienced well trained crew at the controls who can think critically, as opposed to AI or something like that. As far as dumping fuel, I'm not familiar enough with what happened, or flying planes as huge as the 777 to really be able to comment. The plane I fly's maximum takeoff weight is 65 300 lbs, and max landing weight is 62 000 lbs. I would land it overweight without any hesitation if I had a catastrophic failure that required getting on the ground ASAP. A heavy landing inspection would just be required afterwards, but it's a small price to pay when you're talking about being on fire in the air.
 

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Engine Failures/Fires followed by an emergency landing, as well as landing overweight, are very commonly trained events for airline pilots.

Great job to the crew.
Yes, looks like a great job. Safely on the ground with no injuries... tremendous!

When you look at that video of the engine, would say this was still "on fire" or was that engine safely off? To me it looks like this engine was still on fire, and I presume that means it's an emergency that needs immediate landing, right?

Video disappeared from twitter. Here it is on Youtube:

 

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The 777 is designed to fly with single engine but you wanna land as soon as possible

With an engine blown apart you don't know what other damage could have occurred to the wing or fuselage from debris. Could also be weight imbalance from parts falling off especially during landing or if there are fuel tank imbalances adding another complication

I suppose they also wouldn't have reverse thrust after landing
 

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Yes, looks like a great job. Safely on the ground with no injuries... tremendous!

When you look at that video of the engine, would say this was still "on fire" or was that engine safely off? To me it looks like this engine was still on fire, and I presume that means it's an emergency that needs immediate landing, right?

Video disappeared from twitter. Here it is on Youtube:

It‘s severely damaged, but I don’t know what they were seeing and experiencing in the flight deck so I can’t speak to that. As m3s mentions, there are a lot of factors that play into the decisions in an event like this. Great job.
 
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