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The science needs to evolve. There needs to be one system that exchanges and dehumidifies the air. Currently we have whole house dehumidifiers (WHD) with fresh air intake and HRV's / ERV's. Some combine the two. We need one system. HRV's are useless in the summer, especially when one is using them as their only exhaust vents. Adding warm fresh moist air into a cold basement is a recipe for condensation, mold, etc. WHD's with fresh air intakes don't exchange air, don't recover lost heat, etc. Most HVAC techs are lost and wouldn't be able to balance a complicated system. Ask questions in Ontario and you'll likely get many blank stares.

Regardless of climate one system should be developed that can exchange / filter air, recover lost heat and add dehumidification. All while working in harmony with forced air heating and cooling - balance.
There is a good line of HRV/ERV from Zehnder which was pretty much state of the art when we built a house 5 years ago. We installed one of the Zehnder HRVs as part of the Passive House building standard to control air flow between inside and outside. This gives you something close to what you describe for one system. But the 'system' is the whole house not an add-on unit for retrofit. I keep ours going 24/7 365 to ensure lots of fresh air since the house is basically airtight. When it's cool outside in the summer we open windows of course. The Zehnder HRVs have a 'night cooling' feature to close a damper so fresh air bypasses the heat exchanger when outside temp is cooler than inside temp so that helps a bit.

To your point about science needing to evolve. The building science, construction details and qualified products are out there. The building codes need to improve though for new builds and until that happens this will remain a niche technology for enthusiasts. The cost added to a new home build is reasonable about 10% overall, but it's a struggle to find trained builders and tradespeople who are invested in efficiency. But they are out there for sure.
 

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For builders who need to compete and sell houses it's just not worth it short term. Reality is consumer decisions are based on superficial things
Exactly right. I'd guess that an ultra-low energy house package (like passive house) would be about number 10 on a list of top 10 items buyers want in a new house. We need an HGTV channel with some cool dudes to make it more popular.
 

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Unfortunately, it seems like a lot of this has to be integrated into the building code. Consumers just don't understand or appreciate the fine details.
Exactly, it's like fuel efficiency on new cars. Most car buyers just want to know the mpg and trust that the technology works and is monitored by the regulators so it does what's on the label. Like cars, home energy efficiency needs mandatory labeling (e.g. Energuide for homes) to ensure home buyers are informed about what they are buying same as a car or refrigerator. This is common practice in Europe.
 
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