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I've been procrastinating for years with as many excuses as I can think of.

I have a real estate overseas (not in USA). Sure, the lawyer can cover all the necessary issues with respect to what I own (assuming I do not die broke) here, but I do not know how the foreign property is taken care of. Do I need another lawyer in the country where I own the property to prepare a separate will just to address that particular property?
 

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It depends on the laws of the country in which the land is located. You definitely need a proper will done up, to save your beneficiaries from dealing with problems and lengthy probate procedures (in both jurisdictions) down the road.

This issue is fairly common, though, so I would suggest discussing it with your Canadian lawyer first before taking any steps with a lawyer in the other country.

Your lawyer may consult with a lawyer from that country themselves, to make sure that your will (or a separate will, if necessary) is also valid under the laws of that land. Or they may arrange a referral for you to retain a lawyer from that country separately. Again, it would really depend on the country.

That's all I know without doing research, so I hope that helps and good luck!
 

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i'm not at all sure about this newish business of "two wills," one being for assets situated in canada & the other being for offshore ie out-of-country assets.

isn't the estate of a lately-departed canadian supposed to include a complete inventory of all his or her assets, wheresoever situate, at the time of death?

i imagine that a useful disposition of a foreign real estate holding might be along the lines of a usufruct. ie give the property to its eventual heir during one's lifetime, with a usufruct setup so that the donor gets to enjoy the use of the property for as long as he shall want or live.


EDIT: i did skim through the lycos link re the creation of multiple wills in order to avoid probate (two wills? three wills? even more wills?) & noticed that the author isn't a lawyer, he's an MBA doing estate planning.
 

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Well the main thrust was for Corporate holdings vs personal and avoiding probate on the former. But my CPA friend said that multiple wills are accepted in BC and Ontario. I would think it should be reserved for special situations where the extra costs are justified. Avoiding probate on foreign holdings might be enough.
 
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