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Is there an easy way to find out what mutual fund or ETF with the least management fee is invested in a particular company?

As an example, suppose I want to find a fund that has a stake in Facebook. How do I about searching for a list of such funds and their fees?

Thank you!
 

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Morningstar has this information.
For instance, following is the link to the funds & institutional shareholders page for the stock BNS (Bank of Nova Scotia):

http://quote.morningstar.ca/Quicktakes/owners/OwnersOverview.aspx?t=BNS&region=CAN&culture=en-CA

There are two tabs - Funs and Institutions

It doesn't tell you the fund fee of course - that will be for you to find out separately from the fund's website or by looking up the name on Morningstar as well.
Unfortunately, the fund name is not a clickable link that takes you to the fund page on Morningstar's website.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Harold.. I looked at the Funds/Institutions tabs but do not see which companies they invest in.

What I am looking for probably does not exist (?) - I was hoping I could enter a company name or ticker symbol and get back a list of funds from all Canadian institutions that are invested in that company!
 

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budo what you want does not exist imho but here's something that's pretty good.

it'll work for all US stocks - not just those that are traded on the NASDAQ - plus it'll work for all interlisted canadian stocks that also trade on US markets (hint: far more canadian stocks are interlisted than one might realize.)

http://www.nasdaq.com/quotes/holdings-summary.aspx

try CNQ as an example. You'll get the top 5 institutional holders (both canadian & US institutional holders) but click onwards & you'll come to the full list of all institutional holders of CNQ in north america. Same thing for Facebook.

you can also pick out any one of these holders & cross-reference a list of *all* of their holdings.

this used to be a fine way to psych out the canada pension plan investment board, which only publishes its holdings once a year. Because this NASDAQ list is updated quarterly, any person wanting to know what the cppib is up to can pull up their list & see how they're trading quarter to quarter (hint: look especially at the zero or recently-eliminated positions at the end of the list to see what they're selling.)

of course, 100% pure laine canadian stocks that trade toronto only & are not interlisted are not going to show up on the NAZ list.

fund fees are not included or referenced here, so a researcher would have to know a priori which funds are cheap & which ones are expensive.

i'm somewhat left wondering why you'd go to all this trouble ... i mean, if you really want to know which fund is holding a big whack of Facebook at lowest MER, wouldn't it be simpler to just go buy a few FB shares yourself? the MER on self-held shares is zero, there's no way to beat that ...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you humble_pie, I can see the list of institutional holders...

The reason for my question is that my GF (who has no investment knowledge) asked me how to buy FB shares. Since she does not follow the market and to prevent impulsive buy/sell orders, I thought I would steer her away from having a trading account towards putting her money into a low cost ETF that holds FB and similar tech companies. Advice appreciated. Thank you!
 

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As long as she is willing to do a bit of work to learn, and you start with a small amount of money, a trading account would be a great idea. Any fund you buy will have only a few percent in any one stock like FB. I'd rather see her put a few thousand in a trading account and start learning money management and some basic skills. The only way to ever learn how to control those impulsive buy/sell feelings is to actually trade with real money and I think those are valuable lessons everyone should learn. Of course that means that this $ should not be retirement money and should be a small amount she can afford to lose.

A far worse outcome would be to see another person chained to the "professional" money management industry instead of taking the time to learn some basic trading and investing skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good advice; thank you Lephturn. I guess whether she wants to buy stocks directly or buy an ETF, she will need to have a trading account somewhere. I think she is interested in several technology stocks and not just FB but she is not sure what others to buy and that is why I am thinking of an ETF. I found the XSP iShares S&P 500 ETF which has an annual fee of only 0.1% so thinking of recommending it (unless you know of a better one :) )

Thanks again!
 

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If she's mainly interested in technology she could also get XQQ (iShares Nasdaq 100) - its top holdings are:
AAPL APPLE INC
MSFT MICROSOFT CORP.
GOOG GOOGLE INC CLASS C
GOOGL GOOGLE INC CLASS A
AMZN AMAZON.COM INC.
INTC INTEL CORPORATION CORP
QCOM QUALCOMM INC.
GILD GILEAD SCIENCES INC.
FB FACEBOOK INC.
 

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Is there an easy way to find out what mutual fund or ETF with the least management fee is invested in a particular company?
Usually the funds will have a page that gives a quick list of holdings such as the "top ten" or "top holdings".
Otherwise, you might be able to find it from their detailed statements.

ETFs that follow an index will do the same thing but tend to provide more detail. Then too, one can look at the index the ETF is based on. For example, one is thinking of an ETF that tracks the TSX/60 such as iShares XIU, there is:

1) the iShares web site - http://ca.ishares.com/product_info/fund/holdings/XIU.htm

or

2) any site that lists the index components - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S&P/TSX_60


... As an example, suppose I want to find a fund that has a stake in Facebook. How do I about searching for a list of such funds and their fees?
I'm not sure this exists ... you may have to approach it from the fund/ETF category perspective and then look at the fees.


Cheers
 
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