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I meant to hang onto them for the rest of my life but if you think I am going to sit here and watch my hard earned money melt away and do nothing about it you have another think coming.
Lets look at Johnson and Johnson. You said you bought it a year ago, roughly speaking, it was $135 paying ~3% yield. Today it sits at $146 so not only has it gone back to what it was, it has surpassed it - and they did not cut dividends the entire time.

Dividends, not cut and increasing for over 18 years - They have increased their dividends since at least 2002. I didn't go back further because there was a stock split and I didn't research by how much or the amount.

Stock Price - The stock price keeps going up. There is nothing wrong with the chart below, that's exactly what you want to see out of a stock.
20860


From the information above, I don't believe your money was "melting away"; And generally speaking, that's exactly what the community agrees you do - nothing. Buy and hold works for most blue chip companies - your money was not melting away; it was experiencing regular market rises and dips.
 

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My records show I made $455 on the J&J and lost $6167.96 on CVS. I can't give exact dates, but I bought both some time in October 2019 and sold in May or June, when the recovery was well under way. In other words I did not panic when they went down, I gave up on them when they failed to recover along with the rest of the market.

In the meantime I made over $70,000 trading in and out of TQQQ between March and August, and would have made 4 or 5 times that if I had nerve enough to go all in and stay in for that period of time.
 

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The point wasn't about bragging about big $ amounts, just if you got to take part in the market sale and how those investments turned out. My total amount was mainly new investment money and was used to rebalance, which obviously went into stocks starting in March.
Buying stocks back then, was really just a gamble - not sensible investing.

Rebalancing to an arbitrary EQ/FI ratio when the world was falling apart around us, isn't something I would have considered. Not even now. This Pandemic is not over.

I put money from maturing funds back in March/April into cash-like securities. Short term GICs, Coupons and high quality preferreds. Letting existing equities ride out the pandemic. Not adding any and replacing those with higher perceived risk with safer options.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Buying stocks back then, was really just a gamble - not sensible investing.

Rebalancing to an arbitrary EQ/FI ratio when the world was falling apart around us, isn't something I would have considered. Not even now. This Pandemic is not over.

I put money from maturing funds back in March/April into cash-like securities. Short term GICs, Coupons and high quality preferreds. Letting existing equities ride out the pandemic. Not adding any and replacing those with higher perceived risk with safer options.
Your opinion is fine, not saying you or anyone else should have done it. To me it was sensible investing, buy when the markets are down and it paid off so far.
 

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For a young(er) investor in the midst of building a portfolio, buying in March (at some point well below peak, but not necessarily at the bottom) and/or April was a good way to get into the market with a 'buy and hold' strategy. If not 2020, and if not 2021, those stocks will have climbed significantly post-pandemic. I deployed a fair bit of cash in 2008-2011 period and have reaped the benefits of buying 'lower' than the 2007 peak. The same thing applied this year if one was still in building mode. The key is to consider long enough periods in timing that market, and that is measured in years, not months.

It is a different story for those of us in retirement/withdrawal. We shouldn't be making any changes in times of turmoil. After all, the portfolio was already positioned to handle thick and thin, right? If we reacted, at least significantly, it is because we didn't have the portfolio positioned properly in the first place.
 

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For a young(er) investor in the midst of building a portfolio, buying in March (at some point well below peak, but not necessarily at the bottom) and/or April was a good way to get into the market with a 'buy and hold' strategy.
And I think many new brokerage accounts were created in March/April. There was a lot of popular enthusiasm for stocks, not just through games like Robinhood but also discount brokerages... helped by the lockdowns and for many people, more cash on hand than usual.

Some of it was gambling, though.

It is a different story for those of us in retirement/withdrawal. We shouldn't be making any changes in times of turmoil. After all, the portfolio was already positioned to handle thick and thin, right? If we reacted, at least significantly, it is because we didn't have the portfolio positioned properly in the first place.
I agree. The goal should be to stick with an existing plan. The pandemic isn't over, and neither are other surprises. There is never such a thing as "clear sailing" in the stock market.

It's always scary. In fact it's amazing how often some kind of disaster happens. A brief history of the last few years:
Does anyone even remember these? Nope...

COVID is obviously more severe, but it won't be the last scary event.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
For a young(er) investor in the midst of building a portfolio, buying in March (at some point well below peak, but not necessarily at the bottom) and/or April was a good way to get into the market with a 'buy and hold' strategy. If not 2020, and if not 2021, those stocks will have climbed significantly post-pandemic. I deployed a fair bit of cash in 2008-2011 period and have reaped the benefits of buying 'lower' than the 2007 peak. The same thing applied this year if one was still in building mode. The key is to consider long enough periods in timing that market, and that is measured in years, not months.
Even though I'm close to retirement I'm still working and building my portfolio. I'll be holding these buys for many, many years (maybe not all of them but likely most of them) into my retirement.
 

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I started investing in the stock market for the first time on April 15.

Bought CTC-A on April 15, sold on June 3, up +35%
Bought OTEX on April 15, sold on June 3, up +14%
Bought WELL on April 27, up +260%
Bought DOO on April 15, up +127%
Bought GSY on April 15, up +132%
Bought GSY on June 4, up +56% (overall +67%)
Bought SCL on June 1, should have sold it one week later at +175%, but still holding it at +64% currently
Bought OVV on May 1, up +95%
Bought CJT on April 27 and June 3, up +63%
Bought ERO on April 20, up +59%
Bought XBC on April 29, up +57%
Bought KXS on April 20 & 23, it was up around +55% until it crashed in November, currently at +30%
Bought VMD on April 20 & 23, it was up around +55% until it crashed in September, currently up +26%
Also bought CSU, BYD, AC, XIT, which are up between +10% and +22%
Bought REAL on September 17, up +7%
Bought most of my KL holdings on its peak at the end of April, down -2%
Bought one bad performer on May 19, DYA is down -28%, but still holding it for fun
Portfolio overall up only +35% because my biggest holdings were the worst performers.
Unannualized XIRR +43%
Annualized XIRR +82%
Hmm isnt that a lot of transaction fees? :unsure:
 

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Hmm isnt that a lot of transaction fees? :unsure:
I've built that portfolio this year from scratch, so - yes - a lot of buying fees, but that's currently a difference between +36.3% and +36.8%... There will be much less transactions now that I've set a base. My next transactions will be ETFs (no fees but MER) and rebalancing or opportunities. Fees are about $5-10 so I don't buy below $1000 worth and ideally $5000 worth.
 

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I had some existing investments, but purely post covid stats: took out 180k heloc at the end up March, up 102k since then (57%).
Other: $3,600 interest paid on the LOC, $5,100 dividends received, a few hundred commissions etc on trades.

I started with just a few index funds (ITOT/XIU etc) and then after the general market rebound I have made multiple moves since early May. Some beaten down REITs, some good gains on banks, big gains on ARKK ETF (innovation-based ETF. tesla, etc) some other larger gains on smaller investments (100% on keyera after a buying around 11.50), etc.

It's been a good climate to "ramp up my game". My greed level has been getting much lower the last week or so as the obvious opportunities become a bit more obscure.
 

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In April, I made a list of 20 "wish-list" Canadian stocks to buy. I ended up purchasing shares in 5 of them. What is interesting is that every single one of the 20 stocks is up today, ranging from 163% (TOG) to just 3% (ENB), at an average of about 65%.

I think this just reminds me that this year has made everyone look like a genius. There are few stocks actually down since the March lows.
 

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I think this just reminds me that this year has made everyone look like a genius.
Its interesting to think about but for every genius, there's a seller. Who are they? Why did they sell?

Also, we are still in a terrible pandemic. Who knows what early 2021 has in store for us. There could be a second crash this winter if things don't get better (lock down wise).
 

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Its interesting to think about but for every genius, there's a seller. Who are they? Why did they sell?
They could be people also making a lot of money during this pandemic and selling to take profits. They could be even better geniuses rotating between hot stocks with some swing trading. They could be low-risk profiles who decided to sell because they didn't handle the -30% in March and wanted to get out once they recovered a bit. They could be shorts covering their positions which were expecting a worse outcome that never came (yet).
 
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