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Sounds good. Alas, it will not work on our 2006 Honda Accord or our 2007 Toyota Solara.
 

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Satellite messaging is handy. There were many stretches of road across Canada and US that still have no cell signal

For older vehicles you could buy a SPOT and they offer $30/year for roadside assistance that cover US/Canada
 

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Discussion Starter #63
Satellite messaging is handy. There were many stretches of road across Canada and US that still have no cell signal

For older vehicles you could buy a SPOT and they offer $30/year for roadside assistance that cover US/Canada
Great if you are travelling off-road in remote places. However, fairly hefty up front cost for limited everyday use. Interesting though.
 

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Discussion Starter #64
Our new GM vehicles have satellite tracking so they work everywhere.
But roadside assistance is not free??


PlanBasicProtectionSecurityGuidance
Price (per month)Free for 5 years2$19.99$24.99$34.99
Price (per year)Free for 5 years2$199.90$249.90$349.90
Remote door lock/unlock√1
Remote horn & lights√1
Remote vehicle start√1
Destination download
Remote vehicle status in app-
Emergency Services-
Automatic Crash Response-
Crisis Assist-
Roadside Assistance-
Stole Vehicle AssistanceAdd-On-
Turn-By-Turn NavigationAdd-OnAdd-OnAdd-On
Hands-Free CallingAdd-OnAdd-OnAdd-On30 Minutes
Location Manager / Family LinkAdd-OnAdd-OnAdd-OnAdd-On
OnStar 4G LTE and Wi-Fi HotspotAdd-OnAdd-OnAdd-OnAdd-On
OnStar Smart Driver
AtYourService√1√1√1
 

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Great if you are travelling off-road in remote places. However, fairly hefty up front cost for limited everyday use. Interesting though.
Umm, not really agent99. Knowing where you are thanks to GPS does not get you help. Note that the product being discussed is called 'Roadside Assistance.' The key word is 'roadside'. When you go 'off-road', none of the services including CAA cover you. If you check, you will find that the policy will say something like, 'designated road'. That means it must be named or numbered in some way that is recognized as a 'designated road' in the province or state etc.

Someone calling Onstar (or AAA or HT's provider,etc.) and saying, 'I'm on an off-road trail' is not going to get a tow truck coming out to them believe me. Just try to imagine a tow truck even trying to get to you in places like you will see in this video.

Personally, I consider Onstar a real sucker's product. Even during the 'free period', you paid to have it in the vehicle in the purchase price.
 

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Just try to imagine a tow truck even trying to get to you in places like you will see in this video.
Any responsible off roader never wheels alone, they are their own recovery crew. And for the few that do, or maybe require additional equipment, there are clubs and/or businesses that do tow out of those off-road areas but I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be covered under regular roadside assistance.
 

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Any responsible off roader never wheels alone, they are their own recovery crew. And for the few that do, or maybe require additional equipment, there are clubs and/or businesses that do tow out of those off-road areas but I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be covered under regular roadside assistance.
Sigh, try to follow the topic a response is directed at cainvest.

I was responding to agent99's response, to sags suggestion of Onstar. Agent99 responded that it sounded 'great if you are travelling off-road in remote places.'

Onstar is of no use in such cases. Your response to my response about Onstar has WHAT to do with Onstar? Answer, nothing at all.

As for 'ANY responsible' off-roaders never wheel alone', that is a personal choice someone may make while knowing the risks they take. It does not make them 'irresponsible' if they do so, it simply means that they choose to take 'personal responsibility' for themselves. That you might see it is irresponsible just indicates your own risk aversion level.
 

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Sigh, try to follow the topic a response is directed at cainvest.

I was responding to agent99's response, to sags suggestion of Onstar. Agent99 responded that it sounded 'great if you are travelling off-road in remote places.'

Onstar is of no use in such cases. Your response to my response about Onstar has WHAT to do with Onstar? Answer, nothing at all.

As for 'ANY responsible' off-roaders never wheel alone', that is a personal choice someone may make while knowing the risks they take. It does not make them 'irresponsible' if they do so, it simply means that they choose to take 'personal responsibility' for themselves. That you might see it is irresponsible just indicates your own risk aversion level.
I was just replying nicely to your ridiculously extreme example ... nobody in your linked video situation is going to call onstar. :rolleyes:

Edit: Just to add, most off-road people that would use roadside assistance would 99% be "soft-roaders" hitting simple trails for campsites or even marked gravel roads. Pretty much anyone that has a serious off-road built vehicle knows what they are getting into.
 

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The $30 SPOT Assist service referred to does claim to provide assistance "off grid"

"SPOT S.O.V. is a 24/7 roadside vehicle assistance program that gets help for you and your car, SUV, ATV, RV, trailer or motorcycle with the simple push of a button. Whether you're on or off the grid, you can always count on SPOT S.O.V. to get you out of a jam."

By off grid I suppose they mean off the cell phone grid. You must be within 100m of a regularly maintained roadway and safely accessible by tow truck. Still if you wanted On Star like Satellite assistance this is a cheaper alternative and like I said many roads still do not have cell coverage

SPOT also has the SOS button that will activate SAR or emergency response regardless of location. They sell a GEOS service for $20/year that is like private SAR insurance in cases where public emergency service is not available (in Canada we have public services already)

After a lot of research and talking to the Canadian SAR myself I carry a PLB. It is far better for SAR and doesn't have any subscription fees like SPOT. I do go off road alone but I also have gear and knowledge to survive or hike out and the PLB is for emergency situations where I can't

I've used the freebie roadside assistance but I wouldn't pay for it. Anyone should have some tools and survival gear in their vehicle regardless. In a SHTF scenario you can't always expect someone else to save you if those resources are overwhelmed or far away etc
 

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Discussion Starter #70 (Edited)
After 69 posts (including my own ;) ), I am losing count of the responses from those who have actual experience with HT Roadside Assistance. Count so far:

2 - KCowan who has actually used or tried to use HT Roadside plus myself. 🚔🚔
1 - Ian who has HT card but has not used roadside service. 🚗
1 - Mps With a different free CC service and who has used it in USA. 🚗

Looking elsewhere for input, I found this site that reviews some CC plans. The comments section is more enlightening!
 

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After 69 posts (including my own ;) ), I am losing count of the responses from those who have actual experience with HT Roadside Assistance. Count so far:

2 - KCowan who has actually used or tried to use HT Roadside plus myself. 🚔🚔
1 - Ian who has HT card but has not used roadside service. 🚗
1 - Mps With a different free CC service and who has used it in USA. 🚗
I've never used mine, always came with the new vehicles I've bought, not purchased afterwards.

Many of my friends have used their CAA memberships, I know of three situations last year that I was present for, two required towing and one locked keys in their car.
 

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The $30 SPOT Assist service referred to does claim to provide assistance "off grid"

"SPOT S.O.V. is a 24/7 roadside vehicle assistance program that gets help for you and your car, SUV, ATV, RV, trailer or motorcycle with the simple push of a button. Whether you're on or off the grid, you can always count on SPOT S.O.V. to get you out of a jam."

By off grid I suppose they mean off the cell phone grid. You must be within 100m of a regularly maintained roadway and safely accessible by tow truck. Still if you wanted On Star like Satellite assistance this is a cheaper alternative and like I said many roads still do not have cell coverage

SPOT also has the SOS button that will activate SAR or emergency response regardless of location. They sell a GEOS service for $20/year that is like private SAR insurance in cases where public emergency service is not available (in Canada we have public services already)

After a lot of research and talking to the Canadian SAR myself I carry a PLB. It is far better for SAR and doesn't have any subscription fees like SPOT. I do go off road alone but I also have gear and knowledge to survive or hike out and the PLB is for emergency situations where I can't

I've used the freebie roadside assistance but I wouldn't pay for it. Anyone should have some tools and survival gear in their vehicle regardless. In a SHTF scenario you can't always expect someone else to save you if those resources are overwhelmed or far away etc
I no longer do any 'serious' backcountry type of activities m3s. Simply due to age and acceptance of the physical limitations that come with it.

If I were still doing so however, I can see the advantages to some of the modern technology that is now available like GPS and satellite phones. At the same time though I think they can give some people a false sense of security and the belief that if they get in trouble, they can use such technology to safe their *** for them.

Some years ago when I was living in Scotland there was a news story about a teacher who took his class on a 'walk' in the Highlands. He underestimated the difficulty and time required for the walk. As a result, he had to use his cellphone(luckily he had reception) to contact the local Volunteer Mountain Rescue Service who had to get to them and get them out. There is no doubt some of the students would not have survived a night in the mountains. They had only street clothing and footwear and no more than a sandwich and a bottle of water in terms of any kind of 'supplies or equipment'.

What made the news headline was the response of one of the students when the Rescue Service got to them. This 14 year old girl said to one of the volunteers, 'what took you so long, we called you hours ago.'

Since then I have read more and more stories of people getting themselves in trouble and thinking their cellphone would save them. The same is true of GPS. People have come to rely on them rather than themselves and the ability to read a road map. There are plenty of stories of people who ended up in big trouble following their GPS directions. Family Spends Freezing Night in Car After GPS Directions Leave Them Stranded
 

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After 69 posts (including my own ;) ), I am losing count of the responses from those who have actual experience with HT Roadside Assistance. Count so far:

2 - KCowan who has actually used or tried to use HT Roadside plus myself. 🚔🚔
1 - Ian who has HT card but has not used roadside service. 🚗
1 - Mps With a different free CC service and who has used it in USA. 🚗
Threads invariably get sidetracked agent99 but I can appreciate your perhaps getting frustrated when you are looking for specific info.

The fact is, you have too small a sample of posters in the forum to expect much more than 3 relevant responses to such a specific subject as HT Roadside Assistance though. So, you got what you have got and aren't likely to get much more don't you think?

I have no experience with HTs service BUT I can definitely say that with a 5km tow limit, it would not even make it onto my radar as a viable option.

Maybe, a comparison of various services given YOUR requirements would be of more use to you.

If the only issue you see is how easy it is to communicate with them vs. another service, I think that criteria is simply too narrow to try and make a decision on. I mean, you can get a person who speaks with a difficult accent one day and an entirely different person another day. You can call on a busy day or a slow day and get a different experience. One service may get a tow truck to you in half an hour and the next time you call it's during a snowstorm and no service can get a tow truck to you in less than 2 hours.
 

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What made the news headline was the response of one of the students when the Rescue Service got to them. This 14 year old girl said to one of the volunteers, 'what took you so long, we called you hours ago.'
Hours would be optimistic in Canada.

Our SAR assets are very dispersed for such a massive landmass. We rely heavily on local volunteer SAR. I try to speak to anyone with SAR experience I can and they have many challenges in Canada. US however has even worse problems with false alarms and unregistered devices due to these commercial devices wasting $$$ public resources

People in general need to be better prepared to look after the basics. Have a spare key in your pack. Have booster cables and basic tools. Have an emergency kit and at least some warm clothes. People have died in their cars in Canada in snow storms. You need to be prepared to survive on your own for 3 days imo in Canada off-roading or not
 

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Hours would be optimistic in Canada.

Our SAR assets are very dispersed for such a massive landmass. We rely heavily on local volunteer SAR. I try to speak to anyone with SAR experience I can and they have many challenges in Canada. US however has even worse problems with false alarms and unregistered devices due to these commercial devices wasting $$$ public resources

People in general need to be better prepared to look after the basics. Have a spare key in your pack. Have booster cables and basic tools. Have an emergency kit and at least some warm clothes. People have died in their cars in Canada in snow storms. You need to be prepared to survive on your own for 3 days imo in Canada off-roading or not
Yes, even getting stuck on the 401 outside Toronto could turn into an overnight nightmare quite easily. I have one of those large plastic storage boxes that I put in the back of my SUV at the start of every winter and put back down in the basement every spring. It includes among other things, a sleeping bag, toques, gloves, boots, first aid kit and candles. I also have a short snow shovel that goes with it.

All year round I have a first aid kit, fire extinguisher, booster cables, flashlight, warning triangle, flares, 12 volt tire inflator and some basic tools in my vehicle.

One other thing I have noticed is a discussion continuing to crop up about charging people for rescue services.

When I hike in Switzerland for example, I buy helicoptor rescue insurance by 'donating' to REGA. Otherwise, you will have to pay for the rescue. Watch the video of the St. Bernard here: Helicopter Rescue in the Alps

Also note the as much as $153 per MINUTE for a helicopter rescue in Italy. Now that could put a serious cramp in someone's vacation budget.
 

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You reminded me the rescue helicopters in Germany were ADAC (German version CAA) If CAA had helicopters I would be more likely to join. All I see them as now is a middle person to call another service for me at a cost of convenience rather than a tangible service

In addition to this, the ADAC provides 55 air ambulance helicopters [3]for urgent medical rescues in Germany, strategically placed so that any location can be reached within 15 minutes. Air ambulance jets are used by the ADAC to rescue their members with a "PLUS" membership or customers who own an ADAC international travel insurance from any location worldwide in the case of accident or extreme sickness.
I believe there are some private air rescue services out west but nothing national like REGA or ADAC. The $20 GEOS coverage from SPOT goes up to $50k helicopter rescue. I know the people doing crazy adventures have even better coverage because $50k won't always do
 

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After 69 posts (including my own ;) ), I am losing count of the responses from those who have actual experience with HT Roadside Assistance. Count so far:

2 - KCowan who has actually used or tried to use HT Roadside plus myself. 🚔🚔
1 - Ian who has HT card but has not used roadside service. 🚗
1 - Mps With a different free CC service and who has used it in USA. 🚗

Looking elsewhere for input, I found this site that reviews some CC plans. The comments section is more enlightening!
To answer your specific question, I used the HT roadside assistance once, last summer in Yellowknife, to get a boost for my F350. Well, I tried to use it...The call was answered promptly, I had no communication issue with the agent who was very helpful, but their system did not have anyone listed in Yellowknife so he assured me I could just go ahead and get a boost, then submit the receipt to HT for reimbursement. I didn't want to bother with the reimbursement process so I used my AMA roadside assistance membership. So that was my only experience with HT. As for AMA, I have had their roadside assistance for over 20 years and used it at least once a year, from helping friends unlock their doors, to changing a flat tire in Arizona on my F350 fully loaded with a truck camper and our gear for a 6-month road trip (not something you want to do on the side of the road), and several long-distance tows in Canada (one was about 230 km from Paddle River to the Ford dealership in Peace River, covered by AMA because the closest dealership was in Peace River), or the US (from near Colorado Springs to Denver, just under 105 km, also covered under my plan). I haven't done a cost-benefit analysis of my AMA plan but as I travel by road full-time between Yellowknife and Guatemala every year, it gives me added peace of mind for $150 a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Thanks. At least you got to speak to HT Roadside. I will have to try it again and if I have better luck, just explain why I have called.
Not familiar with AMA - Is that CAA in Alberta? Regardless, sounds like you need it :)
 

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Discussion Starter #79
Spent some time on net searching for others who have experience with HT Roadside. It doesn't sound good. None of them seemed to have my problem with their communication. But what I gleaned, was that they use small contractors to provide service. Some not too competent, it seemed. Probably best to be avoided!

So getting back to decision making. I have concluded that HT Roadside is next to useless. Other "free" services don't seem better. Other paid services like CanTire's have limitations - I don't want to be towed to a crappy tire :)

There is one other I could consider. I have my classic cars insured through Hagerty who have their own plan. It does seem very good and costs just $55/yr. But how well it works in Canada is another unknown and I would not be covered if driving my wife's car. (But OK in Subaru while still under warranty)

CAA is a known entity that we have had good experience with and works regardless of what car we are driving or even a passenger in. Cost just one users smart-phone monthly fee or one Starbucks a month :) (Neither of which I use)
So that will be it - Thanks for helping me decide!
 

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Thanks. At least you got to speak to HT Roadside. I will have to try it again and if I have better luck, just explain why I have called.
Not familiar with AMA - Is that CAA in Alberta? Regardless, sounds like you need it :)
Yes, AMA is the CAA for Alberta. I did need it and I still plan to keep it, although I hope I will never have to use it again. I have quite a few epic breakdown stories that will make anyone feel great about their own vehicle problems after all :D
 
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