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Since the March lows do you think we have entered the next bull market. I think other then gold we are just sucking up money from the sidelines and such to send the market higher. I don't think earnings are good enough to keep a good bull market going.

We will see new lows in the future lower then they were in March which will give us another great buying opportunity.
 

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I think everybody spends too much time worrying if this is a bull market or not. If you buy a dividend paying company that is growing in a sector with favourable fundamentals, how can you go wrong? Even if you overpay for the stock, the company may grow into the over-valuation.

That is why I like growth not value. With value, if you overpay, you are dead man walking. Just my two cents.
 

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"Market commentators and investment managers who glibly refer to growth and value styles as contrasting approaches to investment are displaying their ignorance, not their sophistication."
- Warren Buffett, 2000 Letter to Shareholders
 

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In Your Face Rickson...

"We think diversification, as practiced generally, makes very little sense for anyone who knows what they're doing. Diversification serves as protection against ignorance.” - Warren Buffett

Uh, Warren Buffett is so 1980's.
 

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I think everybody spends too much time worrying if this is a bull market or not. If you buy a dividend paying company that is growing in a sector with favourable fundamentals, how can you go wrong? Even if you overpay for the stock, the company may grow into the over-valuation.

That is why I like growth not value. With value, if you overpay, you are dead man walking. Just my two cents.
I think any growth stock selling cheap has a lot of value in it. :) And there are still cheap growth stocks out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am not really a value investor either but I think in a market like this you have to be careful and get a good price when you buy. If we were in a long bull market like 1982-2000 then you can just buy and hold and not worry so much about over-valuation. I believe however that we are in a market more like the 1970's where you would get big market declines and great market rallies that rewarded those who waited and paid a low price.

If I were to buy something right now I would consider buying FTS-T or maybe SC-T after I had looked into it some more.
 

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I laugh ever time I heard that 0% in the last 3 years. It's just talking head crap on TV to get people scared.
 

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I think everybody spends too much time worrying if this is a bull market or not. If you buy a dividend paying company that is growing in a sector with favourable fundamentals, how can you go wrong? Even if you overpay for the stock, the company may grow into the over-valuation.

That is why I like growth not value. With value, if you overpay, you are dead man walking. Just my two cents.
BTW, this *** speak would, in a best case scenario, allow for a zero percent return. I wonder if Buffett has any job openings... you should check into that. :rolleyes:
 

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When you start out dollar cost avg. is great. Doesn't really matter were the markets are you will avg. yourself into to a nice position.

If I continued to buy threw this peak my Div. yield would go down and my avg. cost would go up.

So patience is key.
 

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I don't know why you guys are talking about stocks being too expensive right now. Every time in the past, previous highs have been easily surpassed. We are about 40-50% from the highs. What makes you think we are now facing a major shift?
Even if, despite all signs that the economy is rebounding, a major correction (20-30% down) is in cards, that doesn't mean anyone who enters now will lose money in the medium term (5-10 years), considering we are at 40-50% from the highs.
I think the best approach right now, is to periodically buy stocks (or stock indexes). I will be doing that as long as S&P500 is below 1200.
 

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I don't know why you guys are talking about stocks being too expensive right now. Every time in the past, previous highs have been easily surpassed. We are about 40-50% from the highs. What makes you think we are now facing a major shift?
Even if, despite all signs that the economy is rebounding, a major correction (20-30% down) is in cards, that doesn't mean anyone who enters now will lose money in the medium term (5-10 years), considering we are at 40-50% from the highs.
I think the best approach right now, is to periodically buy stocks (or stock indexes). I will be doing that as long as S&P500 is below 1200.
Quit hanging out with Resource Investor, lol.

If you overpay by 20-30% you need to make 40-60% extra to get back to point A... it'd be much easier starting from even than from minus thirty.

The rest I agree with. Average in since no one knows what the markets will do with perfect accuracy. But remember the idea that one can overpay now and have it be "okay" a few years from now, is pure idiocy. Overpaying is never a good idea. And yes stocks right now are not cheap.
 

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Quit hanging out with Resource Investor, lol.

If you overpay by 20-30% you need to make 40-60% extra to get back to point A... it'd be much easier starting from even than from minus thirty.
The thing is not that I want to overpay. The thing is that I don't want to miss it. People were screaming at 900 that S&P is too high and it will go back to 600, they were screaming at 1000, now they scream at 1100. What if it will not go down right now? What if you'll get the correction when you get to 1400? By cost averaging (buying monthly) when the relative values (relative to the recent bull run) are low enough you will not miss the potential bull run and you will not miss the correction when it will come. Your average cost will be low enough.
 

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The thing is not that I want to overpay. The thing is that I don't want to miss it. People were screaming at 900 that S&P is too high and it will go back to 600, they were screaming at 1000, now they scream at 1100. What if it will not go down right now? What if you'll get the correction when you get to 1400? By cost averaging (buying monthly) when the relative values (relative to the recent bull run) are low enough you will not miss the potential bull run and you will not miss the correction when it will come. Your average cost will be low enough.
Chasing vs overpaying, that's basically the same thing. So if you get a correction from 1400 to 1100, you'd be looking at a gain of zero. Hate to miss out on that would you? ;)

News flash, the easy money has already been made. It's now time to get back to basics and buy solid companies at good values. Notice I said at good values. No one (with lots of brain cells) ever said it was necessary to be in the market all the time.

BTW, I don't think now is a time one needs to sell, this is simply a reply to some "I wanna stay in the poorhouse" thinking.
 

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The thing is not that I want to overpay. The thing is that I don't want to miss it.
What you will earn on any given investment is determined by what you pay, period. There is no growth without value. It is a widely held misconception that price is secondary to purchasing a good company with good prospects in an industry with good fundamentals. This is a recipe for mediocrity because it downplays the importance of value and overemphasizes the importance of predicting the future. Price today is much more certain than what the future will bring. As solid evidence, look no further than the track record of the financial analysts community. Their accuracy is deplorable even one or two quarters out!

Do not concern yourself with missing this opportunity, there will be plenty more. Opportunities arise everyday. You just need to be in a position to recognize and act on an opportunity when it presents itself.
 

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Agreed. As a foot note...

I deplore the common 'valuation' produced today based on estimates of FUTURE earnings estimates.
* The estimate of future earnings is only a guess.
* The estimated future earnings is always 'without all the bad stuff', not Net Income
* Shills always overestimate future earnings but claim accuracy by changing their estimate AFTER the quarter-end, just before the earnings release.
* If they don't get a decent resulting P/E using the next year-end's earnings, they use the earnings 2 year-ends away, or even three.
* This ignores the time-value-of-money and the appropriate discount rate of about 10% for holding equity risk. They say pay NOW for value 2 yrs away.
 

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Chasing vs overpaying, that's basically the same thing. So if you get a correction from 1400 to 1100, you'd be looking at a gain of zero. Hate to miss out on that would you? ;)
I'm not chasing anything, I started buying stocks when S&P was 750 and I will keep doing the same until S&P gets over 1200. Then I'll switch to buying bonds. I will start selling stocks when S&P gets over 1600.
 
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