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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Ok that's a very good point. The mileage is the real concern.

Very interesting that your full size truck gets comparable mileage to a mid size SUV!
Some trucks are becoming much more reasonable. The new Toyota Tundra with twin turbo V6 gets 10.6 L/100 km. And it's still quite capable. 389 horsepower and 479 lb-ft of torque. Also, the rear seats in the crew cab provide more space than a mid size SUV.
 

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While I recognize you are quoting combined economy, you won't see it since most of its life will be around around town, picking up kids from school, at the supermarket or mall parking lots. It will be more like 13-15l/100km in a real life test. One cannot sugarcoat the bulk and weight of those things relative to midsize SUV weighing less than 70% as much. The math doesn't work.
 

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Yes, I would agree it sometimes makes sense to buy new, especially if you are getting a sensible vehicle, and you get a good deal on it. I bought a 2013 Toyota Corolla brand new. It was the previous model year, they were desperate to get it off the lot, and I got it for $23k all in. I figure I could get $14k for it if I sold it today, but I plan to keep it at least another 5-10 years.
It's true that you can periodically find a great deal with an overlooked vehicle from the previous model year. I bought a 2012 Dodge Charger R/T fully loaded from a dealer for $33,000 during the summer of 2013. The MSRP was $42,000. Say what you will about Chrysler, but I LOVED driving that car. Smooth as silk, great suspension, plenty of power. But it was almost useless in the winter. Needed an awfully expensive set of winter tires and I had to load the trunk with sandbags to improve the traction because it was a rear-wheel drive.

I wound up selling it three years later for $24,000.

One thing I dislike about buying new, even with a good deal, is agonizing over every little scratch and ding. Not everyone fusses over that, but I do. I've purchased used vehicles ever since that Charger and it's easier on my mind knowing that there are already flaws in it so the odd mark showing up here and there doesn't get me bent out of shape.
 

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Some trucks are becoming much more reasonable. The new Toyota Tundra with twin turbo V6 gets 10.6 L/100 km. And it's still quite capable. 389 horsepower and 479 lb-ft of torque. Also, the rear seats in the crew cab provide more space than a mid size SUV.
Yes Trucks aren't the enemy, most of the newer versions get reasonable gas mileage when compared to other larger vehicles like SUVs. I was actually surprise how good the mileage was with my truck--and I get a 900+ Km range.
 

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While I recognize you are quoting combined economy, you won't see it since most of its life will be around around town, picking up kids from school, at the supermarket or mall parking lots. It will be more like 13-15l/100km in a real life test. One cannot sugarcoat the bulk and weight of those things relative to midsize SUV weighing less than 70% as much. The math doesn't work.
Our F150 gets low 8's to mid 9's L/100km at reasonable hwy speeds. mid 10 to mid 11 L/100km in the city. It's comparable to a minivan, 7 passenger SUV.

The maverick, while not really a truck and more of a Ute, has a hybrid as standard powertrain and get 40mpg.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I do like the F150. I think I'll keep saving, get all of my debt paid off (which should occur as soon as my condo sells), and I can reassess next year. Maybe with higher interest rates/inflation, and the fact that vehicle manufacturing will hopefully be caught up by next year, I might be able to get a really good deal on one in a year or so.
 

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The kinetic energy demands of accelerating and braking a 5500 lb vehicle in city traffic is a whole lot more than a 3500 lb midsize. I don't care how anyone characterizes it, urban driving of massive weight is an energy hog.

I fully agree highway driving has less to do with kinetic energy than it does drag and friction.
 
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