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Sorry if this has been covered before, but I'm looking for an internet forum in which to discuss the pros/cons of different careers, specifically in the trades. The only career forums I've found tend to focus on finding jobs.

I have a pretty good job right now but am considering a change. It's hard to know whether to take the leap when you're not sure what's out there...the grass always seems greener on the other side...

If anyone here wants to discuss jobs in the trades, let me know.

Thanks
Ian
 

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One big problem with entering the trades is finding an employer who will take on apprentices. Years ago, employers felt an obligation to hire young people and train them for the future. They don't feel that obligation anymore.

Very few, if any, large corporations have apprenticeship programs anymore and small companies aren't interested in paying apprenticeship rates, keeping records etc. They just hire labourers off the street and pay minimum wages.

Here we are in the middle of a recession, with unemployment rates for young people skyhigh, and are employers using this as an opportunity to train young people for future careers with their companies?

Nope.........they plan on hiring who they need by raiding other companies, or they are busy lobbying the government to allow more immigrants (often with questionable education documentation) to perform the work. Anything it seems, than hiring our own.

I was recently perusing some job opportunities from mining and oil companies in various locations in Canada. There is a big demand for "journeyman" status employees, but not much for apprentices.

Consider wisely the trade you will enter. Research job prospects. Google around to see how many companies are offering apprenticeship training in that field.

I don't want to rain on your parade, but there are things to consider that are never discussed in the newspaper articles. Young people aren't entering the trades, and there may well be a reason for it. Nobody will train them.

Good luck...................
 

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Young people aren't entering the trades, and there may well be a reason for it. Nobody will train them.
That is true. Hiring off the street into an apprenticeship is not common anymore.
I teach college in a trade related program.

We deliver a pre-apprenticeship curriculum and place many grads into apprenticeships.

That is what industry wants. Our grad/potential employee makes an investment of time and money. By finishing the program, they can show they are actually interested. (some leave.... had no idea what it was about)

He or she builds half the bridge to show commitment, and maturity and an ability to stick with something for at least a year.
We help screen the applicants. If someone can't sober up for a 9 a.m. class, they won't be successful.
We manage risk for the employers, and do it at the student's expense (mom and dad's $ in the case of the ones who can't sober up).

We provide the basic and intermediate skills and knowledge necessary for success in the industry.

Then, the employer will build the other half of the bridge, investing a lot of money in on-the-job training in the first 3 to 5 years.

My advice would be to look at college programs with an internship block so you can get exposure to the trade.
Find a program that has a high placement rate in the related field (get this data from prospective employers, not just the colleges)

30% of our students come to us because they applied for a job and the employer told them they only hire apprentices from our program.

We have an interview day with 25 employers on site every fall.

One employer just sent 11 offer letters out last Friday. The wages offered are much higher than the typical starting rate for an apprentice that doesn't bring this related education to the table.
 

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Research your industry before committing to college

I dated a girl who had a college diploma but when she applied for jobs they said they preferred to train their own instead. Maybe to pay less or maybe to train the habits they want?

She also found unrelated jobs would prefer someone without a diploma, so she took it off her resume! What a waste of time/money. I'm not saying college is bad, but know your industry I guess. The college won't always tell you they graduate more than the industry hires when you're signing the cheque
 

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No pharmacy tech. Sounds like a bs diploma but they rake in all kinds of tuition from girls. Maybe she should have taken psychology to work at one of the psych factories
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
That is true. Hiring off the street into an apprenticeship is not common anymore.
I teach college in a trade related program.

We deliver a pre-apprenticeship curriculum and place many grads into apprenticeships.

That is what industry wants. Our grad/potential employee makes an investment of time and money. By finishing the program, they can show they are actually interested. (some leave.... had no idea what it was about)

He or she builds half the bridge to show commitment, and maturity and an ability to stick with something for at least a year.
We help screen the applicants. If someone can't sober up for a 9 a.m. class, they won't be successful.
We manage risk for the employers, and do it at the student's expense (mom and dad's $ in the case of the ones who can't sober up).

We provide the basic and intermediate skills and knowledge necessary for success in the industry.

Then, the employer will build the other half of the bridge, investing a lot of money in on-the-job training in the first 3 to 5 years.

My advice would be to look at college programs with an internship block so you can get exposure to the trade.
Find a program that has a high placement rate in the related field (get this data from prospective employers, not just the colleges)

30% of our students come to us because they applied for a job and the employer told them they only hire apprentices from our program.

We have an interview day with 25 employers on site every fall.

One employer just sent 11 offer letters out last Friday. The wages offered are much higher than the typical starting rate for an apprentice that doesn't bring this related education to the table.
I need to clarify...I'm already a licenced tradesman. I completed a college program very similar to what hystat describes (might even be the same one he teaches).

As I said I have a pretty good job...just a little bit frustrated and somewhat discouraged about future career development prospects. I need to constantly learn and progress, also I get really frustrated when management is disorganized.

I have decided to maintain a positive attitude and keep going in my current job. Like I said, it is an excellent job with a good company. Just was looking for a forum where people openly discuss their jobs as I was considering starting over in a different, but somewhat related trade.
 

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I'm a telecommunications engineer by training, I can design telecoms networks, and troubleshoot signal problems, etc,... what sort of company would find my trade interesting ?
 

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Harold,... thank you. Normally, telecoms companies are big entities, and there will be a lot of Ts and Cs working with these. I have worked with such companies during the course of my career.

I am now thinking of joining a smaller company, where the workload is not too high, I wouldn't mind the lower pay too, and I will have a lot of time to myself for my investing activities.

Can anyone here kindly point me where to look for such ""smaller" companies, perhaps they're not directly involved with the business of sending out carrier waves and ensuring the signals are always there; could be of downstream type, like supplying of parts to the telecoms operators, or the contractors building transmission towers, etc,...

I just need to know where to start looking,... I'll do my work from there, certainly,.. wouldn't want to be served everything on the table in a silver platter,....

Thank you.
 

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Planning to apply to come to work in Canada

I am planning to apply to come to work in Canada. Can anyone tell me what factors they look at deciding whether to allow me in? What can I do fairly easily in order to increase my chances of success with my work permit application?
 

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I'm a telecommunications engineer by training, I can design telecoms networks, and troubleshoot signal problems, etc,... what sort of company would find my trade interesting ?
I've heard that stringing network cable pays fairly well (e.g. something like $80-ish dollars per cable pulled - even if there are several cables taking the same path). Start your own business running network cable for small businesses, perhaps?
 
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