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According to Yahoo news, gas prices have risen 41 days in a row. Refinery problems are shown as high prices but as you know imagine there are big players in gas industry. Some people say that oil demand is still weak. So how this is happening? If demand is weak then prices should go down. What’s your opinion?


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Oil price goes up with the prospect of economic recovery. As more signs of recovery comes out (e.g., today with the job data), the higher the oil price is expected to rise.

I read some mixed so-called "expert opinions" on oil price and the sector, and I don't know if (and how quickly) we'll get back to the last year's high.
 

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speculators, as is always the case with gas.

There is always a reason in the media that gas goes up - refinery problems, hurricanes, hot temperatures, magic 8 ball said up, long weekend.

Gas is regulated in Nova Scotia, at least we know what the price from one day to another.

Mind you, we know it will be higher than most of canada pays!
 

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Assuming you're talking about gasoline , not natural gas , gas pump prices are always cyclical in nature and generally go up when demand is higher in the summer months.

It really has little to do with oil prices.
 

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It really has little to do with oil prices.
While short term fluctuations in crude oil prices are usually not reflected in gas prices, they are still related in the longer term. You can see this at http://www.gasbuddy.com/Retail_Price_Chart.aspx, just choose "Canada Average" for Area1, set the time period 6 years, and check off "Show Crude Oil Price". For most of the past 6 years the prices stayed more or less in sync, even more so if you compare using "USA Average".
 

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Oil prices will steadily rise in the long term due to PEAK OIL. I wish more people would truly understand the concept. Once we've hit peak oil (which many believe has passed), oil production will trend lower. Continuously falling oil production will change the world as we know it. There is so much energy concentrated in this easily extractable resource that I doubt we could replace it with other sources at the rate that we will be losing it.

Personally, I hope oil prices skyrocket and stay high. It will give us more time to research ECONOMIC alternative energies, as well as a bigger incentive.

On the bright side, if we don't find enough alternative energies, you can die knowing you lived in one of the best possible eras. You can pass down pictures/stories of airplanes and other oil guzzling machines to future generations since they may never see/use them.

If I were a philanthropist today, this is the issue I would contribute to.
 

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It's a little thing we like to refer to as summer... funny how prices rise at the start and tend to drop, though never as fast, at the end. Could also be referred to as demand. Not to mention the doubling in the price of crude...

Peak oil is more a scare tactic than a reality, however it should propel alternative energy and reduced consumption so I have no problem with it.
 

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While short term fluctuations in crude oil prices are usually not reflected in gas prices, they are still related in the longer term. You can see this at http://www.gasbuddy.com/Retail_Price_Chart.aspx, just choose "Canada Average" for Area1, set the time period 6 years, and check off "Show Crude Oil Price". For most of the past 6 years the prices stayed more or less in sync, even more so if you compare using "USA Average".
I'm not saying they're not related , just a question of how the relationship works.

Is it the price of oil that drives gas prices , or the extra demand for gasoline in the summer that drives up oil prices?:confused:
 

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Oil peak is as real as it gets. The production in most major oil fields in the world is in decline. The cheap oil era is gone forever.
And your 100% sure of this? The last part one could believe the rest is pure speculation. Just because something is in decline doesn't mean it always will be. Same could be said for stocks just over three months ago, bet those chicken littles are wishing now they weren't so gullible. Peak oil is a theory nothing more nothing less. Don't report speculation as fact it makes you look like a fool. And as the saying goes a fool and his money are soon parted. ;)
 

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Peak oil is pretty hard to prove at this stage , one would have to imagine there are still large deposits that haven't even been found yet.

Our own Alberta oilsands , allthough not really financially or ecologically feasible at this point , are barely touched , new oilsands are coming online in Saskatchewan , and as the polar ice caps melt , many believe there are huge deposits in that area that will be available.

Whether we are at peak oil right now or not is hard to prove , one thing that is for sure though , it is coming , oil is a finite commodity.

But back on point , I still believe the price of crude oil has very little effect on the seasonal upticks in the price of gas in the summer , it is more likely the other way around.
 

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It doesn't matter if it has or hasn't happened yet. If it hasn't, it will sooner than later. World oil discoveries have peaked so it's only a matter of time before the production has peaked. We're extracting oil from the ocean, oilsands (which take a lot of energy to extract) and waiting for polar ice caps to melt? Awesome.

"Just because something is in decline doesn't mean it always will be. Same could be said for stocks just over three months ago..." - You can't compare oil reserves to stocks. There are certainly things that can be in decline for good.

This planet can't sustain the current population without oil. You can't grow the world economy with decreasing energy supply. You wouldn't even be able to maintain it. Airlines and other oil intensive industries would be hard hit. Crops would be way less productive so a much higher proportion of total population would have to work the fields, like in the past. I hope I'm wrong though.
 

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It doesn't matter if it has or hasn't happened yet. If it hasn't, it will sooner than later. World oil discoveries have peaked so it's only a matter of time before the production has peaked. We're extracting oil from the ocean, oilsands (which take a lot of energy to extract) and waiting for polar ice caps to melt? Awesome.

"Just because something is in decline doesn't mean it always will be. Same could be said for stocks just over three months ago..." - You can't compare oil reserves to stocks. There are certainly things that can be in decline for good.

This planet can't sustain the current population without oil. You can't grow the world economy with decreasing energy supply. You wouldn't even be able to maintain it. Airlines and other oil intensive industries would be hard hit. Crops would be way less productive so a much higher proportion of total population would have to work the fields, like in the past. I hope I'm wrong though.
Sure I can. Eventhough I didn't actually compare them... it was a metaphor. But anyhow the whole "peak oil" delirium is simply a means to an end. Two very different bedfellows with a common benefit at the moment.

You make assumptions... I'm sure you can figure out the saying that goes with that, lol.

The "facts" that aren't include the ever growing population, the ever declining oil, the ever growing oil demand. Are these true today? Yep. Are they true in the future? Probably? Does probably equal fact? Nope. Unproven theory is speculation. Calling speculation fact is pure idiocy. Most people are idiots and believe what they are told so it does work quite well... at least for a time.
 

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According to Yahoo news, gas prices have risen 41 days in a row. Refinery problems are shown as high prices but as you know imagine there are big players in gas industry. Some people say that oil demand is still weak. So how this is happening? If demand is weak then prices should go down. What’s your opinion?
Good question. I have no idea.
 

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It doesn't matter if it has or hasn't happened yet.
It does matter , if it's already happened we are screwed for getting ourselves into this mess.
If it hasn't happened yet , we may still have time to develop alternative energies and avoid the cosequences of oil withdrawl.

If it hasn't, it will sooner than later.
That's a fair and easy assumption.

World oil discoveries have peaked
Have they? Just how do you know that?

so it's only a matter of time before the production has peaked.
Everything is a matter of time , but can I make money off it in my lifetime?
The markets are all about timing , so that statement while it may be true , is useless without time frames to accompany it.

We're extracting oil from the ocean, oilsands (which take a lot of energy to extract) and waiting for polar ice caps to melt? Awesome.
We're not waiting , they're melting whether we are prepared or not , that is a proven fact. http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/1024-05.htm

This planet can't sustain the current population without oil.
Again how do you know that? If alternative forms of energy are developed and used more efficiently , there's no reason it can't be done.

You can't grow the world economy with decreasing energy supply.
See above.

You wouldn't even be able to maintain it.
See above

Airlines and other oil intensive industries would be hard hit.
Again a fair and easy assumption.
It's a no-brainer that oil intensive industries would be hardest hit by an oil shortage , that goes without saying.

Crops would be way less productive so a much higher proportion of total population would have to work the fields,
Why would crops be less productive , assuming we have alternative energies to take the place of internal combustion engines.
How does oil make a crop grow better?
More people working for a living could be a good thing.

like in the past.
How far in the past? 10 years , 100 years , 1000 years?

I hope I'm wrong though.
Wrong about what? All of the above or just some of it?
Everyone has a right to their opinion , but it's futile to try to pass off a persons assumptions or theories as fact , especially without backup sources as proof.
 

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In May 2008, average gas prices in the United States approached, and in some places passed, $4.00 a gallon, shattering records. But this was nothing new to American consumers. May was a month of records that broke one after another, and that came on the heels of months of rising prices.

Gasoline is the bloodline that keeps America moving, and tracking gas prices can feel like a roller coaster ride. They're down a little one month, up the next, and then they shoot up more than 50 percent in a year. Plus, they're different depending on where you look. Other countries -- and even other states and cities -- can have very different gas prices from your local Gas-N-Go. To the average person, it probably seems as though there's little rhyme or reason to how gas prices are determined. In this article, we will look at the forces that impact the price of gas at the pump, and we'll find out where your gas money actually goes.

Americans have an insatiable thirst for gasoline. Just look at the amount of traffic on roads and highways, and you'll see that a severe gas shortage would practically cripple the United States. Americans drive nearly 3 trillion miles per year, according to the Motor and Equipment Manufacturer's Association [source: MEMA]. That's about 820 trips from the sun to Pluto and back.
 

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I fondly remember the time (early 2003, before the start of the Iraq War) when I used to pay 63c. per gallon in the US.
I could fill up my car for about $15.
And these days I pay 97c. (CAD) per litre - costs over $35 (CAD) to fill up the same car.
Damn taxes, war and the govt.
 
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