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In Scotland, the butchers, bakers, dairies are going back to the 'old days'. My sister-in-law is getting home delivery from all of them. Milk in glass bottles. Remember those days when the milkman left your milk on the front doorstep?

Farmers are also driving around with a speaker offering fresh veggies. Transaction is done while maintaining distancing.
 

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can’t do that in Toronto.
you'll be there all day!
It looks worse than it is because everyone is spread out. I counted about 70-80 customers. I'd say about an hour wait time for a full store. If the doors open on an empty store, they'll probably let all of those people in much faster than that.

Probably better to go near the end of the day. I checked out ours last week and around 7pm the line outside was 5 customers. I'll try that next time.
 

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In Scotland, the butchers, bakers, dairies are going back to the 'old days'. My sister-in-law is getting home delivery from all of them. Milk in glass bottles. Remember those days when the milkman left your milk on the front doorstep?
I saw on CTV news channel that a guy who usually delivers milk/dairy products to restaurants is now doing home deliveries in the Ottawa area.

Cheers
 

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So cherrypicking a few small, non-representative samples that support your conclusion? Diamond Princess is a larger sample with more time for cases to actually resolve and it resolved with >1% case fatality ratio.
I'm pretty sure you have no idea what the Santa Clara or Iceland samples represented.

But since you're accusing of cherry picking...the Diamond Princess was heavily skewed to the 70+ age group. It's not a representative sample and yet you brought it up. Don't be a hypocrite.
 

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Freezers are the new TP. People must be planning on loading up.

Our freezer is already full, but we are still buying dry goods. Hereford canned corn beef, canned deviled ham, are good alternative sources if needed.

Long lineups at banks, grocery stores......but ordered an electric can opener (figure we will need it) at Bed, Bath and Beyond and nobody there.

Ordered online, they texted me to come to pick up 10 minutes later. Pulled up in front of store and popped the trunk. They dropped it in and that was that.
 

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I think that with a full digit death rate, locking down makes sense
with .02% as some researchers are claiming, I don't think so.

Ventilators don't kill people, they just buy a small amount of extra time.
I watched 2 videos on Martin Armstrong site with doctors from New York saying the ventilators were being used wrong causing death. They were even putting people on ventilators that could complete full sentences.
 

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Cargill has re-opened even though the workers are mostly refusing to return to work. Meanwhile, the NDP in Alberta are calling for a 'full investigation' etc.

Why is it that we always have to start the 'blame game' when what we should be doing is FIXING the problem.
 

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We just had some sirloin steaks and extra lean ground beef delivered yesterday, no noticeable price difference.

It makes me think of gas prices. Do they price it based on what it cost when the gas station had their underground tanks filled up or do they price it based on what it will cost today to replace it? In the case of gas it is of course the latter for all the major gas companies. Only with a small private owned gas station (hard to find these days of course) does an owner perhaps price based on what was paid to fill their tanks.

We get gasoline from a local reservation which prices by what they paid. We get meat from our local Foodland but they buy from local farms and meat cutters. That also I believe is priced based on what our local supermarket paid.

Most items in our Foodland come from a central warehouse and prices are dictated by 'Foodland' but where items are bought locally, they are priced by our local Foodland itself, not the 'central office'.

Local items are meats, poultry, fruit and vegetables. In a few months, they will be selling corn that was picked from the field behind our house for example. This month it will be fresh asparagus, the first crop of the season.
 

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We just had some sirloin steaks and extra lean ground beef delivered yesterday, no noticeable price difference.

It makes me think of gas prices. Do they price it based on what it cost when the gas station had their underground tanks filled up or do they price it based on what it will cost today to replace it? In the case of gas it is of course the latter for all the major gas companies. Only with a small private owned gas station (hard to find these days of course) does an owner perhaps price based on what was paid to fill their tanks.
From what I understand they price based on replacement cost, unless they're trying to draw down the tanks for delivery.

That's generally how I think things should be priced if you're an ongoing operation.
It's also why prices move through the system faster than the physical product.

Imagine if you knew that the next load of gas was going to be +$0.10, then everyone would run out now to get "the cheap gas", and we'd have a shortage. Pricing at market prices helps remove those demand spikes.
 

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I don't have to imagine ... I heard about the damage Hurricane Katrina was doing, headed to the gas station to fill up and the next day the same station was $0.14 more expensive. Lots of people were lined up buying gas.

In some areas of Canada, the overnight jump was reported to be $0.20 where part of the US reported a $0.12 jump.

It might have shortened the demand but it didn't avoid a spike or a shortage. In at least Eastern Canada, gas stations ran out due to what was reported as panic buying.


An even larger jump in prices in 2007 did not stop gas stations from running out of gas either.
IIRC, one of the articles from 2007 talked about while few likely remember anything like the current situation of closed gas stations with gas rationing, it's happened at least five other times.


It's odd how when gas prices are questioned because of good news or an improving situation, industry reps talk about how it takes time for the benefits to work their way through the system. Bad news, OTOH gets priced in overnight or over a couple of days.


Cheers
 

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I don't have to imagine ... I heard about the damage Hurricane Katrina was doing, headed to the gas station to fill up and the next day the same station was $0.14 more expensive. Lots of people were lined up buying gas.

In some areas of Canada, the overnight jump was reported to be $0.20 where part of the US reported a $0.12 jump.

It might have shortened the demand but it didn't avoid a spike or a shortage. In at least Eastern Canada, gas stations ran out due to what was reported as panic buying.


An even larger jump in prices in 2007 did not stop gas stations from running out of gas either.
IIRC, one of the articles from 2007 talked about while few likely remember anything like the current situation of closed gas stations with gas rationing, it's happened at least five other times.


It's odd how when gas prices are questioned because of good news or an improving situation, industry reps talk about how it takes time for the benefits to work their way through the system. Bad news, OTOH gets priced in overnight or over a couple of days.


Cheers
In Ontario we had a price spike, but I don't recall shortages.

I'm not surprised that they ran out of gas out east. It's a regulated market. That's why price controls are BAD.
 

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There were in Waterloo, ON.

There's also ... Customers fume as gas stations run dry
And an article where PetroCanada said 75 of 440 Ontario gas stations ran out of gas (17%) and Esso reported 30 of 200 (15%) ran out. Some stations implemented a 75 litre limit.

Maybe you were in an area that wasn't affected?


Cheers
 

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There were in Waterloo, ON.

There's also ... Customers fume as gas stations run dry
And an article where PetroCanada said 75 of 440 Ontario gas stations ran out of gas (17%) and Esso reported 30 of 200 (15%) ran out. Some stations implemented a 75 litre limit.

Maybe you were in an area that wasn't affected?


Cheers
I lived in Waterloo, ON back then.

Don't recall it being an issue, but a few gas stations (less than 1 in 5) isn't something I'd necessarily notice.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Steam whistle is Warning there could be beer shortages due to lack of bottles. Seems people are not returning their empties. The advise is to put them at your curb if you don’t want to go to the store yourself. Someone will pick them up and return them.
 

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Steam whistle is Warning there could be beer shortages due to lack of bottles. Seems people are not returning their empties. The advise is to put them at your curb if you don’t want to go to the store yourself. Someone will pick them up and return them.
Some people?
The Ontario Beer store banned returns.
I heard they opened it up at a small fraction of stores, and even then have limits.

Beer crisis averted as Ontario retailer set to restart bottle recycling program

Their policy is causing the problem.

This is just like the economic depression we're in, it's caused by government policy.

When people implement these policies, they should consider the implications.
If you ban and limit bottle returns, you'll run out of bottles.
 
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