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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
At the half way point in the year, I was doing some 'due diligence' on some of the ETF options out there for inclusion in a diversified portfolio.

Admittedly, this is just a snapshot in time but might be of interest to some.

First, concerning the Classic Couch Potato portfolio, the 3 year returns of it's components are as follows:

XBB: +6.52%
XIU: -3.67%
XSP: -12.81%
XIN: -15.87%

With this portfolio, you would have been in the hole held up only by your bond allocation.

Bonds: High Yield bonds generally have performed best over the time period.

I see little reason to consider the Claymore bond ETF offerings over the iShares bond ETF's given the data over this three year period.

The iShares Value ETF (XCV) seems to be a better choice than the XIC or XIU if this time frame is any indication.

The U.S. ETF offerings differ little although the iShares Russell 2000 ETF (XSU) would appear to offer an edge.

There is not much to choose between the Claymore and iShares International ETF's.

The Claymore BRIC ETF has a 3 year return of negative 2.56% which means that this investment didn't help much to boost portfolio equity returns over this period.

The new iShares Nifty Fifty India ETF seems to be leading the pack of emerging markets ETF's in it's first three months of operation.

The iShares REIT ETF has outperformed the Claymore Global Real Estate offering.

The Claymore Canadian Dividend ETF has generally outperformed the iShares XDV over this time frame but both ended up with a negative three year return as of June 30.

Just some general observations for what they are worth--maybe not much!!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I realize that past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results and that market conditions change and evolve. That said, here are the best performing ETF's with their 3 year returns:

iShares CDN Bond Index (XBB): +6.52%
iShares CDN Corporate Bond Index (XCB): +6.48%
iShares CDN Gold Sector Index (XGD): +12.76%
iShares CDN Government Bond Index (XGB): +6.28%
iShares CDN Materials Sector Index (XMA): +4.54%
iShares CDN Real Return Bond Index (XRB): +7.10%
iShares CDN Short Bond Index (XSB): +5.88%

Note: All returns in the above two posts are excluding dividends.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is not about ETF's but, what the heck, it's my thread!!

Here are some stock picks from Fortune Magazine. Do your own due diligence. Sorry, I don't have the ticker symbols.

Qualcomm
The Hartford Financial Services Group Convertible Preferred Shares
Goldman Sachs
Ultimate Software Group
Checkpoint Systems
Omnicare
Hewlett-Packard
Plum Creek Timber REIT
Diageo
Nektar Therapeutics
Royal Gold
Equinix
 

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Discussion Starter #4
From Ellen Roseman of the Toronto Star, here is a list of Canadian stocks with at least seven to nine years of dividend increases:

Canadian National Railway Co. (CNR)
CCL Industries Inc. (CCL.A and CCL.B)
Empire Co. Ltd. (EMP.A)
Home Capital Group Inc. (HCG)
Enbridge Inc. (ENB)
Power Financial Corp. (PWF)
Toromont Industries Ltd. (TIH)
Toronto-Dominion Bank (TD)
Great-West Lifeco Inc. (GWO)
Canadian Natural Resources (CNQ)
Canadian Western Bank (CWB)
Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS)
Cameco (CCO)
Suncor Energy (SU)
Talisman Energy (TLM)
BMTC Group Inc. (GBT.A)
Shaw Communications (SJR.B)
Industrial-Alliance Life (IAG)

According to Ms. Roseman, "among these stocks, the one with the highest total return over five years (including dividends) was BMTC Group Inc., a Montreal-based chain of home furnishing stores, at 196.53 percent".

Shaw Communications was next (86.27%)m followed by Canadian National Railway (82.47%), Canadian Western Bank (69.83%), Fortis (61.83%), Enbridge (60.9%) and Canadian Natural Resources (55.98%).

I would be interested in feedback as to which of these stocks you would hold in your portfolio and which ones you would not and why you would not.

Thanks for your input!! :)
 

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I would be interested in feedback as to which of these stocks you would hold in your portfolio and which ones you would not and why you would not.
I have some of these in my portfolio and would gladly hold others and some more of the same.
The real question is - at what entry price?
I don't agree with the oft-quoted opinion that if you are buying for the long run, the entry price does not matter.
I find that the ones I am interested in are trading well above my valuations.
With the uncertainity in earnings, I'm not willing to buy at current market prices, esp. the bank & financial stocks.
Among the utilities, I find FTS overpriced.
There are some in here that I've never looked into.
Will do now. Thanks for posting.
 

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This is not about ETF's but, what the heck, it's my thread!!

Here are some stock picks from Fortune Magazine. Do your own due diligence. Sorry, I don't have the ticker symbols.
It might be instructive to find out how Fortune's past picks fared:

All but one of the “stocks for the decade” not only lost money, but also underperformed benchmarks. Only one single stock outperformed an appropriate benchmark, two went bankrupt, and the average pick lost 31 percent.
How Not to Create a Fortune
 

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Invested $10k in January 4, 2000: results reflect share value increases plus dividend distribution additions.:)As of July 12, 2010 the market value of the portfolio was $29,113.76. This was a what if scenario exercise to test the potential of the portfolio.


All stocks with TSX symbol.

BCE 24.1%; cnq 455.8%;ema 14.8%; eca 13.0 %; enb 149.1% ;fts 342.9 %; imo 174.6%; ipl.un 62.1%; pif.un 15.6%; rci.b 86.5%; ry 481.1%; su 907.8%; td 60.8%; trp 5.0%

All stocks total return +188.9% for 10 year + period. Jan4/10 to July12/10 is negative -o.4%. With dividends included.

The stocks were suggested as an income portfolio, in a January 2010 Ellen Roseman column, in the Toronto Star. She also had, in the article, a growth portfolio. I used the income portfolio for a real buy scenario; and then sold off certain stocks till I got what we were happy with for our portfolios, in regard to the equity portion--Recently we bailed out; on reflection a very unwise move; so we will get back in very soon.
 

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seem to be decade-long totals. However, the discrepancy between td & ry puzzles me. I don't recall their performances being so wildly disparate. There's never been a day in the past decade when i've been without these 2.

one among several advantages of canadian bank common is that it doesn't really matter which trio, or duo, or quattro, you pick in the long term. If one of the big 5 chartered banks falls behind the others for whatever reason, it will eventually pull up its socks & catch up. Remember just over a year ago when bmo was the pariah ... hiding all kinds of shaky engineered real estate debt ... dividend cut rumours & rumblings ... but now, only 15 months later, bmo is the golden-haired child while worry climbs over royal's US exposures.

i understand harold's concern with valuations but the limb i'm out on says we're rallying recently. Especially energy. Have been buying. For the long term.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sell-offs are often overdone. Thus, we could be in a two week or so correction followed by further downside until the fall.

Nobody knows for sure.
 
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