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Discussion Starter #1
Any folks in their 30's or 40's that have retired out there? Care to tell your story? What you do in retirement etc?

I am thinking about it myself however cannot imagine what I will do to keep myself out of trouble.

Lemme know.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Congrats on achieving financial independance at an early age. Would you share a bit of your story?

Here is an interview I did with QCash, he retired @ 35 w/ $1.5 million in net worth.
Sold my business a year ago - I am 36 with wife and 2 kids - took a position with the new owners. Working for new owners is hard and not something I plan to do for long-term.

Financially secure with no debt. Really am curious what other 'young' retiree's do to keep themselves occupied.
 

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If you don't know yet, learn to invest and manage your capital so that it will grow. Beside that, take long vacations and find some hobbies.
 

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If you don't know yet, learn to invest and manage your capital so that it will grow. Beside that, take long vacations and find some hobbies.
Learning to invest has been my primary goal which is why I hang out here so often!
 

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Sold my business a year ago - I am 36 with wife and 2 kids - took a position with the new owners. Working for new owners is hard and not something I plan to do for long-term.

Financially secure with no debt. Really am curious what other 'young' retiree's do to keep themselves occupied.
My neighbor is young and "retired" , he's on welfare , I think he's financially secure , the cheques just keep coming:eek: , he drinks beer everyday , mows his lawn occasionally.
I guess it depends on you're finances , everyone has a different view of "financially secure".
I've been retired for 2 years now due to an injury , it sucks.
I think if you have to ask , you may want to keep working.;)

If you don't know yet, learn to invest and manage your capital so that it will grow. Beside that, take long vacations and find some hobbies.
Vacations from what?:D
I have a few friends that were "financially secure" when quite young , didn't last long though , there back to work now , by necessity , not by choice.
Good luck , be careful.
 

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Vacations from what?:D
I have a few friends that were "financially secure" when quite young , didn't last long though , there back to work now , by necessity , not by choice.
Good luck , be careful.
Vacations from the wonderful :rolleyes: Canadian weather, or vacations to see something else than the same streets all the time.
One should retire only when the return of his investments more than cover the lifestyle that he wants (including travel and hobbies). If your neighbor's lifestyle expectation is to be able to drink beer all day long, then probably a welfare check would cover that.
 

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I tried a stint of early retirement in my 40s after being encouraged by such books as "The Joy of Not Working", "How to Survive Without a Salary and "Stop Working" (the one by Dianne Nahriny).

I found that 43 was too young to retire (for me, anyway) and that a frugal lifestyle is much less pleasant when it's a requirement rather than a choice. I would say that 55 is a better target for most people who don't absolutely love their jobs.
 

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The first thing I did was take over most of the house work (wife Still Working).
Then I setup a routine get up 6am do my walk and get the Globe drink coffee.
Wife gone to work spend time on investments 2 - 8 hrs. With house projects thrown in.

Then I've had the same hobby for 30 years that changes with the seasons that's another 3-4 days a week.

Plus a regular bed time 10:30 -11.

I had the benefit of seeing 100's retire and the most successful were prepared stuck to a routine and would jump at the change to something different and never looked back.

The ones that failed got there sleep patterns all messed up booze and drugs take over ect. and it's a slippery slope.
 

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took a position with the new owners. Working for new owners
How is that being "retired"?
Financial independence maybe, but not retired.
Speaking of which, these days the lines between retirement and financial independence and semi-employement are blurred.
Gone are the days of 9 - 5 jobs until official retirement age and then living purely on pension.
I am not from that generation so I wouldn't know what that was like anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
How is that being "retired"?
Financial independence maybe, but not retired.
Speaking of which, these days the lines between retirement and financial independence and semi-employement are blurred.
Gone are the days of 9 - 5 jobs until official retirement age and then living purely on pension.
I am not from that generation so I wouldn't know what that was like anyway.
I'm not retired. I am considering retirement but at 36 am torn.
 

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Well StinsonT I am quite flexible with my time schedule but still kinda work for myself. I rent apartments for a living but am quite chilled about how much work I do. I spend most of my time hanging around the house waiting for people to call then I make an appointment or two per day.

I spend a lot of my time looking at my warrants and buying and selling them. Then I also spend a lot of time with my son and hubby which is great.

I have a few words of advice for the "retired"

Make sure you get out of the house EVERY day and talk to people.
Exercise
Find something to do to keep active otherwise doing nothing becomes your new job and figuring out the proper way to load the dishwasher becomes very compelling.

That's it
 

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Hi:

Well I've been out of the workforce close to a decade now. Not really sure any more when the transition between "lack of new contracts" and "don't want any new contracts" occurred. Currently 47.

I see it as mostly a disposition thing. I have no trouble finding something to do, indeed, my issue is shaking free from my wife and the TV to get more done. Many people would climb the walls if they did not have a job to go to. I am not one of those people.

Stuff currently swimming around in my head:

Tuning up the saw I acquired from a friend.
Going to look at and most likely buy another power tool on Saturday.
I have xylophone kits to build for various little people.
Have to start thinking about ordering seeds and starting plants.
For above, I really should make a heated grow cabinet, as the naked basement is too cold this time of the year.
Always working on my workshop. Stair treads and bookcases are current interests there. Oh, and really need to build a proper hand tool workbench soon.
Any likelyhood I'll get around to fencing this spring? If yes, need to source about 100 12 foot cedar posts.
Need to get next year's firewood done.
Suspended ceiling in the basement rec room.
Am I putting in any new fruit trees this year?

Then I have about 18 magazine subscriptions, following sites like this etc.

There are 4 fires to tend, three here and one at vacationing neighbour's place. Most of the cooking and domestic stuff.

My question is how do people find time for paid employment?

hboy43
 

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The first thing I did was take over most of the house work (wife Still Working).
Then I setup a routine get up 6am do my walk and get the Globe drink coffee.
Wow, that sounds like my life right now (still working) ;)

I work more than fulltime, but because I work at home I do all the food shopping, cooking, and laundry, plus the usual maintenance stuff (although she washes the dishes and cleans the floor). It's been that way for years. We both get up at 6, have breakfast together and then I read the paper (online, I haven't bought a paper newspaper in about 10 years).

As for retirement, I don't think I'll be able to ever truly stop working as I won't have enough saved up to fully retire, but I have so many interests that I think I'll probably be just as busy as I am now. I've gotten so used to working 70-hour weeks that cutting back to 40 or 50 would seem luxurious.
 

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I have been retired for over 3 years and love it. 59 years old. Work out strenuously each day, ski in winter, mountain bike in summer. Travel out of country 60-70 days per year. Own 3 places in Canada. Lovely wife 52 who enjoys doing exactly the same things. 3 out of 4 parents alive and take up a fair bit of time. When to retire is such a personal decision. Depends a lot on the type of work you do and how much you enjoy it. Personally I wouldn't have reired unless we could afford to do it in style. But to each his own.
 
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