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the closest city to me...about 20 mins away....just approved Uber in the last few months. How long has Uber been around in Canada? Shows how long it takes for wide-spread Adaptation/conversion. And this about 90 mins away from Toronto. wonder how long it will take for all these new ways of doing things to reach the farther stretches of the country.
 

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I found cod liver oil effective for Bursitus dotnet_nerd. However, you have to pay attention since Vitamin A does build up in the body and you can 'overdose' on it unlike say vitamin C which does not build up but instead, any excess is simply flushed out in your urine.

Some people seem to think you can take all the vitamins you want, that simply isn't true.
Good point, oil-soluable vitamins (A, D, E) can accumulate in your liver. But one capsule a day is fine. I only take it in the winter during cold/flu season
 

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the closest city to me...about 20 mins away....just approved Uber in the last few months. How long has Uber been around in Canada? Shows how long it takes for wide-spread Adaptation/conversion.
Umm, I'm not sure what the approval of the city has to do with how long Uber has been operating in a given city. Uber never really pays any attention to a city until AFTER they have started operating there and the question then comes up in City Council of whether to ban it or not. They act first and then deal with any fallout later.

For example: Uber coming
 

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Old thinking sags. What is to stop supermarkets from simply changing into warehouses from which ALL items are delivered to your home? You say there is not enough 'capability', by which I presume you mean delivery drivers. What's to stop there from being enough drivers? The answer is there is nothing actually stopping that from happening.

Consider Uber eats etc. for example. They didn't exist until recently and then lots of people started using them. As the demand increased, the number of people willing to do that job increased. If demand for delivery from the supermarkets increases there is no reason why the number of people willing to do the deliveries will not increase.

The only thing that could stop it would be if there were not enough people willing to do the job. What the heck, I'll make this somewhat tongue in cheek remark. It's a good opportunity for all those unemployed GM Oshawa workers to find some work.

This is logistically a bit more difficult than you might imagine. I would think grocers are already thinking about how to do this, but to expect them to be able to do this in thousands of stores across the country quickly is a bit unlikely. Things you might not have considered: need considerably more staff to do the order assembly and delivery tasks than cashier staff that is freed up. Also IT infrastructure. All those pickers need devices, servers and connectivity to be able to do this. Consider that pick-up/dellivery is currently maybe 1-2% of the grocery market, it would take time to ramp up the infrastructure to get to a substantial number, never mind 100%.
 

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Umm, I'm not sure what the approval of the city has to do with how long Uber has been operating in a given city. Uber never really pays any attention to a city until AFTER they have started operating there and the question then comes up in City Council of whether to ban it or not. They act first and then deal with any fallout later.

For example: Uber coming
seems like Orillia handled it differently. They wanted vulnerable search checks before allowing ride sharing to operate. Because of that, uber chose not to enter the city Uber officially gets green light to operate in Orillia.

Either way, for whatever reason, the point is that we can’t point to Uber eats to feed the country. A lot of the country still doesn’t have regular Uber service.
 

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This is logistically a bit more difficult than you might imagine. I would think grocers are already thinking about how to do this, but to expect them to be able to do this in thousands of stores across the country quickly is a bit unlikely. Things you might not have considered: need considerably more staff to do the order assembly and delivery tasks than cashier staff that is freed up. Also IT infrastructure. All those pickers need devices, servers and connectivity to be able to do this. Consider that pick-up/dellivery is currently maybe 1-2% of the grocery market, it would take time to ramp up the infrastructure to get to a substantial number, never mind 100%.
exactly. The pivot to regular, routine, reliable, nation-wide grocery delivery will not be done in time to meet the fearful demands that will exist this year.
 

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seems like Orillia handled it differently. They wanted vulnerable search checks before allowing ride sharing to operate. Uber officially gets green light to operate in Orillia.

my point is that we can’t point to Uber eats to feed the country. A lot of the country still doesn’t have regular Uber service.
My point is that that was then and this is NOW. What applied pre-Covid19 does not apply post-Covid19 as we can obviously see. You didn't need to quarantine for 14 days after returning to Canada even last week, this week you do.

If you were 80 and/or had an underlying medical condition, you didn't need Uber Eats, 2 months ago. Now maybe you do. What do you suppose the Orillia Town Council would say today if someone said, 'we need a meal delivery service provider authorized right NOW.' Motion passed.

People keep thinking in YESTERDAY'S terms. This is TODAY and the entire world is different.
 

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exactly. The pivot to regular, routine, reliable, nation-wide grocery delivery will not be done in time to meet the fearful demands that will exist this year.
I think you guys are underestimating just how much online grocery shopping is already being done and how much infrastructure to support it already exists as well as how prepared to increase it the major suppliers are. They have been gearing up to take OVER the grocery store market, for several years already. This may in the end prove to be a big plus for them in achieving that.



The only issue really is finding enough drivers quickly enough.
 

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It is that kind of thinking which will help to SPREAD the virus Beaver101. Every interaction, regardless of what precautions anyone takes, adds to the possibility of spread. That is why we hear the words, 'necessary' and 'non-essential' being used in all the advice we are being given.
... so are you telling me that "food" is "not necessary or not essential" when I'm down to half a loaf of bread or 4 eggs that should last me for a couple of days? And I should have "preplanned ordering online on these perishables a week ago" for delivery of April 2nd at earliest? Or maybe I should just stick with eating canned beans for the rest of the year?

You 'don't see why you can't go to the supermarket'. That's why, because when you do, YOU endanger others health. It's SELFISH to go if there is a way to get your groceries WITHOUT going. There is a way to get them without going, have them delivered.
... how is it that I'm endangering others' health when I haven't been infected as have no symptoms, haven't wandered outside for 2 weeks now, working at home and haven't travelled for the past 5 years (staycations are cheap!!!). Has it ever occurred to you I am the one taking a risk by having to go to the supermarket (because I'm still able to, not a cripple), having to expose myself to all the infected (your assumption) outside? Who is the selfish one?

As for 'if you don't mind or can wait that long'. Stop thinking like it was before this started. If you have to wait a week for delivery then WAIT a week. Learn to plan ahead and order today what you will need next week. Or is that too difficult for you to do?
... no, I can't wait as I have (had) to get my prescription meds also. Should I call the pharmacy to get them to deliver. Like hell they will. And they won't even fill a rx for more than 30 days which means I have to make another trip in a month's time to get the rx filled again meaning I have increased my risk of getting infected.

I MIND if YOU instead decide to put other people at RISK by acting in a way that is irresponsible, simply because you prefer to.
... so you're saying you're SO responsible by ordering delivery simply because you can afford to (brag brag brag), and not because you don't want to get infected by everyone else. Simple question: what are the chances of you getting infected if you Fort Knox yourself? NIL. So what are you minding or BSing about?
 

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I think you guys are underestimating just how much online grocery shopping is already being done and how much infrastructure to support it already exists as well as how prepared to increase it the major suppliers are. They have been gearing up to take OVER the grocery store market, for several years already. This may in the end prove to be a big plus for them in achieving that.



The only issue really is finding enough drivers quickly enough.
I don't think I am. The capacity to serve even 10% of the market is barely there.
 

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Sags. Please remember you said that when we eventually get back to Universal Income debates and others just like it. I have been saying what you just said above, to deaf ears I will add, for a very long time.
The argument against UBI is the argument for a big cash handout to everyone right now.

it's literally the same arguement.

Pre-COVID-19
If we give them cash, they'll sit at home and watch Netflix!
No they won't!!

During COVID-19
We need to give everyone cash so they can sit home and watch Netflix!

Honestly I think we're in a brutal situation, with the coming rent strike, it's going to destroy small landlords.

This whole mess is going to get really nasty.
 

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I don't think I am. The capacity to serve even 10% of the market is barely there.
Agreed ...past history is being ignored as well. Grocery Gateway was all the rage with some of my friends in the late '90's but was bankrupt and had it's assets picked up by Longo's in 2004.

As for the idea that online grocery shopping being underestimated - back in early Feb this year, the grocery delivery business in the UK was estimated at 10% and the US at 7% while the high estimate for Canada was 1.7%



I expect they were increasing a bit and places that had ignored it were likely noticing the trend but I don't see how that small a market would be in position to ramp up that quickly ... especially as the earlier failures would likely be reminder not to over invest/over build infrastructure.


Cheers
 

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The delivery of pet food never did catch on for Pets.com

Turns out the domain name was worth more than the business.
 

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Getting more drivers is only part of the problem.

The stores can't afford to pay someone $14 an hour to pick groceries and someone else $14 an hour to drive them over.

The profit margins on groceries is small and they will need to raise the delivery fee or raise prices overall. Somebody has to pay the piper.
 

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This is the first time I have ever tried to attach a photo. Hopefully it works.

I would rather go shopping for my own supplies and so does my neighbour.
We just exchanged two masks for eight rolls of Cashmere Ultraluxe toilet paper (8 doubles = 16 singles). Considering it took me 3 hours to make them, I think my next door neighbour got the better deal. ;)

View A of Supplies for Face Mask.jpg
20065
View E of mask.jpg View F of Hiding behind the mask.jpg
 

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Getting more drivers is only part of the problem.

The stores can't afford to pay someone $14 an hour to pick groceries and someone else $14 an hour to drive them over.

The profit margins on groceries is small and they will need to raise the delivery fee or raise prices overall. Somebody has to pay the piper.
But you need to pay them a "living wage", of course nobody wants to pay those prices.

The issue is that there are a bunch of ignorant people who think there are some Scrooge McDucks swimming in vaults of gold, and everything would be better if they would just pay for it.

The reality is most of the economy is average working people who already feel like everything is tight.
Even the relatively wealthy are complaining about it.

Secondly, paying someone to collect and deliver your goods without an extra fee or price hike simply isn't financially reasonable.
 

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The issue is that there are a bunch of ignorant people who think there are some Scrooge McDucks swimming in vaults of gold, and everything would be better if they would just pay for it.
There are some ignorant people with little knowledge, but there are just as many people who are lazy and feel entitled to the fruits of someone else's hard work.
 

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I don't think I am. The capacity to serve even 10% of the market is barely there.
Did you read the links I provided andrewf? Here's a quote from the second one.
"The survey also suggests interest in grocery shopping online is rising fast with nearly 28% saying they shop for groceries online and 6% saying online was their “main method” of grocery shopping.

Another survey, just 18 months ago, found only 15% of respondents had bought groceries online."

Think it through. Ordering online requires only that a platform to do so exists. It has no real limits as to the number of orders that can be handled. Picking orders and delivering orders requires only warm bodies. Those warm bodies are the only real bottleneck to the process.
 
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