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The public, and government, will barely put any effort into solving these problems. What should happen now is a Manhattan Project style enormous project, either domestic or collaboration between countries. There should be hundreds of billions of $ poured into R&D, perhaps TRILLIONS of $ poured into R&D, to get scientists and researchers working on projects such as redesigning hospitals, redesigning the healthcare system / infrastructure, using modern data and analytics to improve healthcare, supply chains for emergencies/vaccines, understanding the psychology of public health, and disaster management in general...

I mean total re-design. Big stuff.
I'll have to disagree with some the above ... dumping tons of money towards some unknown future virus threat is a waste of time IMO. I do agree that they should have an updated global pandemic playbook but this shouldn't be rocket science or cost billions of dollars to create.
 

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Discussion Starter #3,403 (Edited)
Lack of preparations and the handling of the pandemic is high lighted in the Ontario AG's scathing report on the government response.

I think the failures and delays support James4beach assertion there needs to be robust pre-pandemic strategies, planning and preparation.


The handling of the crisis by predominately Conservative Provincial governments is having a negative impact on the Erin O' Toole's Federal Conservatives.

The Liberal and NDP Premiers may be just as bad, but there are many fewer of them.

The steep decline in public support for Alberta's Premier Kenney is notable, as it may put several Alberta ridings in play in a future Federal election.

 

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I'll have to disagree with some the above ... dumping tons of money towards some unknown future virus threat is a waste of time IMO. I do agree that they should have an updated global pandemic playbook but this shouldn't be rocket science or cost billions of dollars to create.
My focus wouldn't be pandemic-specific, but a redesign and modernization of the hospital systems. This would improve healthcare both for pandemics but also other emergencies, and regular health.

Hospital systems are archaic, clunky machinery
 

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Discussion Starter #3,406 (Edited)
A systemic review and major changes must also be forthcoming regarding long term homes.

There must be regular inspections and audits, including unannounced visits by inspectors empowered to lay charges for non-compliance that are available to the public to view when considering where to place their loved ones.

The last thing the government should be doing is quickly pushing through legislation to remove most if not all liability for nursing homes. That is an unwarranted gift to the corporations that operate long term care homes and the insurance companies that issue policies to them. Who could feel secure placing their family members in any nursing home when a veil of secrecy shrouds the conditions in the homes ?

And yet incredibly.......that is what our Provincial government has done, making the law retroactive to last March to thwart ongoing private lawsuits from exposing the depth of the neglect. They don't want the public to know the extent of the neglect.

And now we learn that the health experts were not even included on the panel of experts advising the government, replaced instead by political insiders.

After a cost of hundreds of billions of dollars to battle the pandemic, we have to learn from the failures or we are doomed to repeat them.
 

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My focus wouldn't be pandemic-specific, but a redesign and modernization of the hospital systems. This would improve healthcare both for pandemics but also other emergencies, and regular health.

Hospital systems are archaic, clunky machinery
Some areas of healthcare could no doubt be improved but I'm not so sure for many hospital services. With regards to emergencies/pandemics, these are overflow situations that should be handled outside the normal services. With good planning such situations can be dealt with very well but, in case of pandemics, prevention (if possible) is the key.
 

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Some areas of healthcare could no doubt be improved but I'm not so sure for many hospital services. With regards to emergencies/pandemics, these are overflow situations that should be handled outside the normal services. With good planning such situations can be dealt with very well but, in case of pandemics, prevention (if possible) is the key.
When we moved to a smaller town (outside of a city of 30,000), we couldn’t find a family doctor. We had to take my son to the hospital for a plantar wart and my wife went for a minor issue (non-emerg). It was at the 2nd visit that the attending doctor was willing to take us on as his patients. Without an assigned doctor in this city, you cant even go to the walk-in clinics....you need to be a client of one of the assigned doctors.
we’ve been back to the hospital for some broken bones, and at least half of the patients in the waiting room were there for visits that should be handled by family physicians or clinics. The trouble with our hospitals is only one sign that the entire industry is inefficient.

I know in Florida, pharmacists( or is it a nurse in the pharmacy?) can prescribe some drugs....although they keep pseudoephedrine behind the counter....Which I found weird....and it’s limited to one package per customer.....they even scanned my Ont DL when I bought it. I think dealers make illicit drugs from it.

my local township now has a virtual walk in clinic. You can meet with a doctor through virtual conference and he can prescribe treatment or meds for the the more common ailments,
 

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I'm reading that Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine is reportedly being flown by United Airlines chartered flights to distribution hubs in the USA and that they will be booking appointments in the next 14 days for citizens to receive the vaccine.

But then I read the articles where Trudeau "asked time and again by reporters when we might see a vaccine, given the U.K. is already booking appointments and the U.S. is looking at a roll out two weeks from now, Trudeau fumbled all over the place, often attempting bad sports analogies".

He came out from his hidey hole to give us one of his platitudes saying "What really matters is when we get to cross the finish line.” Not to me. What matters to me is when I get the vaccine and why are we so far behind the rest of the world?

So basically, USA and UK are booking appointments and Canada, if everything works out, might get vaccines next fall? Is that about it? That seems to line up with the Astra Zeneca roll-out map with Canada next November.

ltr
 

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An interesting bit of information came out of the MB covid update today ... there have been no repeat cases reported. Granted we've only had ~17,000 cases but that is good news IMO.
 

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I'm reading that Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine is reportedly being flown by United Airlines chartered flights to distribution hubs in the USA and that they will be booking appointments in the next 14 days for citizens to receive the vaccine.

But then I read the articles where Trudeau "asked time and again by reporters when we might see a vaccine, given the U.K. is already booking appointments and the U.S. is looking at a roll out two weeks from now, Trudeau fumbled all over the place, often attempting bad sports analogies".

He came out from his hidey hole to give us one of his platitudes saying "What really matters is when we get to cross the finish line.” Not to me. What matters to me is when I get the vaccine and why are we so far behind the rest of the world?

So basically, USA and UK are booking appointments and Canada, if everything works out, might get vaccines next fall? Is that about it? That seems to line up with the Astra Zeneca roll-out map with Canada next November.

ltr
You're being a bit fast and loose there. The same map shows US as May, not now. What is that timeline? To deliver all of the contracted doses? Canada is getting doses of some vaccines in Q1 2021.
 

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UK just approved Pfizer's vaccine for emergency use. US will be next week.

There are going to be a lot of awkward moments in Canada as the US starts vaccinating 20-30 million Americans a month. Maybe 80-100 million Americans before Canada even possesses enough doses for 3 million. Embarrassing.
 

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UK just approved Pfizer's vaccine for emergency use. US will be next week.

There are going to be a lot of awkward moments in Canada as the US starts vaccinating 20-30 million Americans a month. Maybe 80-100 million Americans before Canada even possesses enough doses for 3 million. Embarrassing.
This might turn out to be good news ... we'll see any short term side effects before mass use in Canada.
 

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Discussion Starter #3,415 (Edited)
I am sure a lot of political pressure came to bear on the pharma companies by the US and others.

Send us the vaccines first if you want to continue to have unfettered access to our markets....kind of pressure.

Trump made it clear in his tweets and pronouncements that he expected the drug companies to do what he wanted...or else, and the companies know how vindictive he is.

Canada has orders in for all the vaccines. They put the orders in before the UK and other countries.

We will receive them asap and that is the best we can do. I don't expect widespread vaccine shots until late 2021, but I hope I am wrong.

It is all politics and we simply don't have the "market access" clout of other countries.....regardless of who the PM is.

I doubt calling up the CEOs and screaming at them would have much impact on the outcome.
 

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The US has now hit the point where the daily deaths match the number of casualties on 9/11, discussed here. Very close to exceeding it anyway.

From now on, it's 9/11 every day.

Which is incredible when you think about how seriously Americans took 9/11, and yet, don't take this one seriously at all.
 

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My family members (in Europe) who have covid are doing better. I got an update from the couple ... the husband has been released from hospital, and the wife is also feeling better as her condition improves.

I got a text tonight from her. She writes, direct quote: "This is an awful disease . . . I'm an idiot. I wasn't careful enough to protect myself"

Those are 30-somethings. We all need to protect ourselves, no matter what age we are. It can hit everyone really hard and can land you in the hospital.
 

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The US has now hit the point where the daily deaths match the number of casualties on 9/11, discussed here. Very close to exceeding it anyway.

From now on, it's 9/11 every day.

Which is incredible when you think about how seriously Americans took 9/11, and yet, don't take this one seriously at all.
Not surprising at all, if you understand psychology.
 

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Covid 19 has shouted quite loudly how much people truly care about other people, that they have never met. Actions certainly speak louder then words. People like to give lip service to their caring and humanity but at the end of the day they only care about themselves, as confirmed by actions during this pandemic.

This does not surprise me. What surprises me is how many people still believe that they are different. Like giving 1% of their income to charity makes them special, or volunteering at the soup kitchen 1 day per year, or wearing a mask when they go to Cdn. Tire but removing it when they go see their friends, knowing this action feeds the pandemic that might seriously harm others.

I remember the long struggle I had with getting people to embrace the benefits of masks (still ongoing). I remember one of the common arguments, earlier in the pandemic, was simply that masks ONLY protect you if the sick person was wearing it. I fought an up hill battle to prove that this argument was wrong, not only because it was, but because I knew that most people would never wear a mask if all it did was protect others. People are inherently selfish. Even the few that do help others do it only to make themselves feel better about doing it. If that is not there, they usually are not there.

As I have mentioned before. No where in the world have I observed anyone point out that a vaccine dose would do so much more good in the arm of a middle aged foreigner then in the arm of their 20 year old compatriot. And we wonder why we have so many wars.
 
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