Canadian Money Forum banner

21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,042 Posts
I've always asked myself where did all these allergies in children 'suddenly' come from? As a youngster, I don't recall anyone I knew in school having allergies other than hay fever perhaps. A peanut allergy was unheard of. It seems in the last few generations, allergies of all kinds have suddenly popped up.
They came from people actually getting tested now. Would be interesting to see stats on how many of those "positive" tests are actually serious, as in need for medication if one was exposed to the allergen.

I know people that are diagnosed with a gluten allergy but eat it on occasion will little to no effect. I know of one other that had a positive reaction on a scratch test for beef. They didn't give it up, have been eating beef for years and are fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,517 Posts
I have never worn shoes inside my home in my entire life. I thought that was the case with most if not all Canadians ....
Nothing scientific but it's about 60% that don't and about 40% that do of my family/friends/neighbours etc.

I've always asked myself where did all these allergies in children 'suddenly' come from? As a youngster, I don't recall anyone I knew in school having allergies other than hay fever perhaps. A peanut allergy was unheard of ...
Had classmates in basically all levels of school, except maybe kindergarden (wasn't paying attention :) ) with peanut allergies. It goes back forty years for me as friends of the family had everyone in the family with different combinations of allergies.

Maybe you were lucky or didn't notice?


From my POV, it's more an increase of numbers versus what to you is a sudden appearance.


Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,517 Posts
They came from people actually getting tested now. Would be interesting to see stats on how many of those "positive" tests are actually serious, as in need for medication if one was exposed to the allergen ...
Maybe ... but then again, I can recall friends of the family taking medication back in the '90's to be able to function so there's also non-life threatening flavours that can have a big impact.

There's also those who carry an epi pen for things like stings where some stings are fine while others have reactions, requiring the epi pen.


Cheers
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,042 Posts
There's also those who carry an epi pen for things like stings where some stings are fine while others have reactions, requiring the epi pen.
There are no doubt people with serious reactions, like those that required to carry an epipen, always have been. I just wonder how many fall into the "not serious reaction" category and only stay clear of allergens (peanuts, gluten, etc) because of a positive scratch test result.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,249 Posts
I have never worn shoes inside my home in my entire life. I thought that was the case with most if not all Canadians. In the UK, the opposite is the case, most if not all wear their shoes in their homes.

Our shoes are put on and taken off in the breezeway between the house and garage. It is really just another part of the house separated by a door from the kitchen and a door from the garage as well as an outside door at each end of the breezeway. It's also heated.
Well, I think it is 'normal' to take your shoes off in the entry area. Not sure it is 'nornal' to have a quasi-inside/outside area to store your shoes. Most Canadians don't wear shoes in the house (with the legalistic exception of in the entry area).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
Many cleaners I have seen including Lysol wipes and Mr Clean state the surface should be kept wet for between 4 and 10 minutes to properly disinfect. That's a long time to keep a surface wet, even if Justin is standing over it speaking moistly.

Spray Nine states on the label that it takes 45 seconds to disinfect. Luckily I have an almost full 2 litre container. That's what I use at home, saving my disinfectant wipes for use outside the home like shopping carts before I use them.

When I go shopping I take my payment card and any loyalty cards and tags and put them in a small ziplock. That way I don't have to touch my phone, wallet or keys when I am shopping (keyless entry/ignition). I sanitize my hands before going to checkout, and again before I get in my car.

I hate wearing shoes in the house, and don't understand how anyone can do it. But in my experience many Americans and western Canadians wear shoes in the home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,762 Posts
Maybe ... but then again, I can recall friends of the family taking medication back in the '90's to be able to function so there's also non-life threatening flavours that can have a big impact.

There's also those who carry an epi pen for things like stings where some stings are fine while others have reactions, requiring the epi pen.


Cheers
Back in the 90s isn't far back Eclectic when you are in your 70s. 'Back in the day' to me is the 50s,60s.70s.

Maybe people died from a bee sting back then, I don't know, but I sure didn't hear about any. Epi pens certainly didn't exist.

I recall being on a backpacking trip down in the Grand Canyon in the 80s and one of the group got bit by a scorpion. She was freaking out etc. When you are in a wilderness location like that, you obviously can't just call for help (pre-cellphone days). So everyone went to sleep for the night and she was told, 'if you wake up, you're alive. If you don't, we'll make sure we bury you with heavy rocks over you so that the critters can't dine on you.' LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
I've been washing my hands a bit more, otherwise no change when I'm at home. I've never really used products like Lysol, except very sparingly. I did buy some Lysol wipes a couple months ago, but I've still got half the container left.

I also don't take off my shoes unless they're visibly dirty. There's no room to keep shoes at the entryway, so I would have to carry them into the bedroom. If they're really wet, I'll put them in the laundry room to dry out. But there's definitely no space in the common areas to have a bunch of shoes laying around. It's the same with most people I know who are living with limited space due to the housing situation.

I go a bit more crazy with cleaning when I'm at work. I usually wipe down the high touch surfaces with the Lysol wipes and clean the table tops with a regular surface cleaner. Apparently the Coronavirus is very easy to kill. You don't need products like Lysol, regular cleaners work fine. The wipes are more convenient, but I find they dry out quickly and you end up using a lot of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,517 Posts
Back in the 90s isn't far back Eclectic when you are in your 70s. 'Back in the day' to me is the 50s,60s.70s ...
"What is food to one, to another is rank poison" is a line from a poem of Titus Lucretius Cato (98–55 BC).
There's 17th century case reports ... fatal anaphylaxis from eating mussels/lobsters in 1798.

Scientific investigation is reported to have started in 1921.

If it's not happening ... I would think it would be difficult to study. :)


... Maybe people died from a bee sting back then, I don't know, but I sure didn't hear about any. Epi pens certainly didn't exist ...
Sure. Keep in mind that the existence of the Epi pen does not tell us about the existence of allergies. It is a simple autoinjector for the drug ephinephrine, that has been in medical use since 1905. I can find reference to epinephrine being used to treat anaphylaxis in the sixties.


... she was told, 'if you wake up, you're alive. If you don't, we'll make sure we bury you with heavy rocks over you so that the critters can't dine on you.' LOL
Not much comfort for her.


Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,361 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
I go a bit more crazy with cleaning when I'm at work. I usually wipe down the high touch surfaces with the Lysol wipes and clean the table tops with a regular surface cleaner. Apparently the Coronavirus is very easy to kill. You don't need products like Lysol, regular cleaners work fine. The wipes are more convenient, but I find they dry out quickly and you end up using a lot of them.
That's my sense too... the virus is pretty easy to kill on surfaces. One reason I think all the Lysol is excessive is that you can clean a surface just by using soap, and some wet paper towels! Soap up the surface a bit, wipe it a few times, clean with paper towels, throw them away.

That's what I'm doing on countertops in the kitchen. Soapy solution and paper towels. That's much less toxic than things like Lysol or chlorine beach. So I still suspect people are going a bit overboard with all the cleaning at home, and it's really not healthy to breathe in fumes from lysol sprays or bleach.

But with objects brought into the house, I do wipe them down with some kind of disinfectant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,440 Posts
But with objects brought into the house, I do wipe them down with some kind of disinfectant.
Depending on the objects, you can just leave them in the garage, or other secure area for a couple of days while the virus dies. I believe it can survive on cardboard and other soft materials for about 24 hrs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
The central banks are loving it making the sheep to scared to use cash. New world order crypto on its way unless people open their eyes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,361 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
lonewolf, I also hate the anti-cash movement (personally I love the freedom and anonymity of cash) but COVID-19 is real, and it really can kill us.

At least temporarily, it makes sense to avoid cash. I'm using the credit card tap payment for everything. Don't need crypto currencies.. CCs are perfectly good.

I'll switch back to cash soon enough.
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top