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CBC has an article of an increase in poisonings and other accidents with cleaning supplies at home:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/health/covid-19-accidental-poisoning-cleaning-products-1.5552779

It looks like everyone stocked up at home and is, apparently, wasting cleaning/disinfecting supplies on unnecessary cleaning at home. You don't have to constantly clean your home. You really only have to sanitize things at the boundary to the outside world. I only use hand sanitizer when I'm outside; there's no point to hand sanitizer at home.

Then, when you get home, wash your hands. A friend of mine who's a nurse reminded me to wash my face too. If you've been in a high risk setting, take a shower when you get home. If there are things from outside that you're bringing inside, then sanitize those. But once you've crossed from the outside zone into your (safe) inside zone, you don't have to keep disinfecting everything.

For example, I see no point to constantly disinfecting your countertops. And how much of these supplies are people going through? I have one spray bottle of "Microban" brand disinfectant (the only one I could find) and I've been using that one bottle this whole time... and it's still nearly totally full!
 

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Some of it might be cultural.....I grew up in a house that smelled like bleach on Saturday’s.
We have always regularly used disinfectants in the Bathroom and kitchen. I know my wife and her family have a huge fear of meat cross contamination. I’m always getting trouble for not taking the precautions she deems necessary (outside of pandemic times). We use our countertops to roll out doughs occasionally. I guess even with the common cold and having young children, we’ve been programmed to constantly disinfectant high touch areas.
 

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Some of it might be cultural.....I grew up in a house that smelled like bleach on Saturday’s.
We have always regularly used disinfectants in the Bathroom and kitchen. I know my wife and her family have a huge fear of meat cross contamination. I’m always getting trouble for not taking the precautions she deems necessary (outside of pandemic times). We use our countertops to roll out doughs occasionally. I guess even with the common cold and having young children, we’ve been programmed to constantly disinfectant high touch areas.
that being said, we ran out of Lysol and my wife said we had the container for about a year. For countertops we use a lysol branded disinfecting cleaner. We’ve had a 4 litre jug for at least 2 years.

for those that are interested in disinfectants, original Pine-sol is a true disinfectant and much easier to find than Lysol products.
 

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It looks like everyone stocked up at home and is, apparently, wasting cleaning/disinfecting supplies on unnecessary cleaning at home. You don't have to constantly clean your home. You really only have to sanitize things at the boundary to the outside world. I only use hand sanitizer when I'm outside; there's no point to hand sanitizer at home.

Something else that you bring into the home that has a good chance of being infected is your shoes.

All those "speaking moistly" droplets in the air that we avoid in public with masks eventually drop to the floor and are picked up by the soles of our shoes. Think about grocery shopping and how the floors must be covered in viruses.

Sanitizing your shoes is something I have read about a number of times.

ltr
 

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Something else that you bring into the home that has a good chance of being infected is your shoes.

All those "speaking moistly" droplets in the air that we avoid in public with masks eventually drop to the floor and are picked up by the soles of our shoes. Think about grocery shopping and how the floors must be covered in viruses.

Sanitizing your shoes is something I have read about a number of times.

ltr
Probably a good time to adopt a habit I have followed for years, since living in SE Asia. Take off your shoes and leave them outside.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes I agree, the shoes are filthy and risky.

I've always removed my shoes when entering the home. Pretty common in most cultures. I would never wear my outdoor footwear past the front entrance.
 

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that being said, we ran out of Lysol and my wife said we had the container for about a year. For countertops we use a lysol branded disinfecting cleaner. We’ve had a 4 litre jug for at least 2 years.

for those that are interested in disinfectants, original Pine-sol is a true disinfectant and much easier to find than Lysol products.
I had a big thing of Lysol too and have been going through it to make my wipes. However, I read Pine Sol and Mr Clean are not on the list that kills COVID. I having been saving my Lysol and Clorex for when I go out, and using Pine Sole, Mr Clean OR my bleach mixture for inside the house (not at the same time)
 

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@james4beach Nice thread James. I have been doing a lot of reading on this, and trying to work out the system at my house and when we go out. We had a lot of cleaners before, but my former housecleaner used to do it all. If I may, I will post up my 'system' or method for cleaning and disinfecting.

I have the following for when I go out, it's on my 'on the go' pandemic pack items:
  • Mask with extra filters for when I am breathing 'moistly' (no further discussion needed)
  • Gloves - I only use this if I am going to be handling a lot of items such as a grocery shopping. It makes it easier for me to disinfect my gloves than my hands after every item
  • 2 Extra plastic bags: to dispose of gloves, wipes and garbage and 1 to put my mask in for washing
  • Lysol wipes for anything that needs a wipe down
  • Lysol cleaner (in a travel bottle)as the sprays the covers larger surfaces better, I use this in conjunction with the wipes, but also have extra paper towels
  • Hand sanitizer for my gloves or hands
  • Rubbing alcohol (in a spray bottle) - for my phone screen if I have to take it out in public, I spray it down before I put it back in my purse
I have this in a little pouch, so I can just grab and go now.

My cleaning before it comes in the house is:
  • Items all taken out of the bags, and bags put in 'quarantine' for at least a week for later use. I try to 'quarantine' as much as I can. This could be groceries, mail, deliveries, anything that can wait.
  • Items that I need prior to my 'quarantine' period or needs to put away right away (perishables and frozen goods) I will try to remove or change outside packing by putting in new bags, wash, or disinfect in that order.
  • Items and hands get washed before we use them with just regular soap and water, if feasible on the items
For over all cleaning and disinfecting:
  • Shoes never come in the house. The bottoms do get sprayed with a bleach water mix when I remember, but I don't do it right away as I usually using Lysol to get the other stuff in the house.
  • Reusable items safety items (masks, filters, gloves, etc) get put in a plastic bag first. Then dumped into a wash container (a salad spinner in my case) at the door and washed and then hung and dried.
  • Hands get washed and face but usually my face is pretty well covered.
  • If I have been out for a long time or feel I have been moistly breathed on or spoken too, my clothes get throw off in laundry (which is at the same door I am disinfecting)
Inside cleaning is the same stuff we have used prior to COVID. We save the Lysol for outside, but Pine Sol and Mr Clean, I have lots so just use that up. We have a plan that if one of us gets sick, will use a bleach: water 1:9 ratio to clean surfaces to reduce spread to the rest of the family. I don't use this outside because I sometimes spray the Lysol on the handles and bleach will bleach my cloths.

I am sure I have over complicated this as I was trying to come up with a system that allowed me to use the right cleaners under the right scenario as certain products are scarce, and I don't want extra chemicals on the stuff my family uses. Hopefully this helps.
 

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Here is the list. COVID-19: List of hard-surface disinfectants authorized for use against coronavirus - Canada.ca

Pine-sol is included but I believe it’s only the original (brown golden) version. It will say it kills 99% on the label. I incorrectly purchased the purple Pinesol in panic, on our first trip after quarantine. I don’t see Mr. Clean on the list.

keep in mind, most disinfectants need to stay on the surface for 10 mins for them to work as advertised. Read your labels to confirm.

and keep in mind.....most “cleaners” (all purpose/multi-purpose) on the shelves are not true disinfectants. Rwder to the site above for guidance (it’s updated regularly)
 

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Here is the list. COVID-19: List of hard-surface disinfectants authorized for use against coronavirus - Canada.ca

Pine-sol is included but I believe it’s only the original (brown golden) version. It will say it kills 99% on the label. I incorrectly purchased the purple Pinesol in panic, on our first trip after quarantine. I don’t see Mr. Clean on the list.

keep in mind, most disinfectants need to stay on the surface for 10 mins for them to work as advertised. Read your labels to confirm.

and keep in mind.....most “cleaners” (all purpose/multi-purpose) on the shelves are not true disinfectants. Rwder to the site above for guidance (it’s updated regularly)
I didn't see the Pine-sol. It had Pine Clean, which may or may not be the same. I have a bottle of the original (brownish) and couple of other bottles with different colors (green, purple, yellow) liquid and none of the DIN matched. I had all of these because our house cleaner would pick up cleaners and forget that we already had some. Happy that she had two bottles of Lysol in the mix too.

I do realize that these are just guidance. I am trying everything I can to reduce risk as help my elderly parents and need to take extra precautions.
 

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I didn't see the Pine-sol. It had Pine Clean, which may or may not be the same. I have a bottle of the original (brownish) and couple of other bottles with different colors (green, purple, yellow) liquid and none of the DIN matched. I had all of these because our house cleaner would pick up cleaners and forget that we already had some. Happy that she had two bottles of Lysol in the mix too.

I do realize that these are just guidance. I am trying everything I can to reduce risk as help my elderly parents and need to take extra precautions.
my bad. I saw the “pine”. I think they are different. I did for sure see Pine-sol Talked about somewhere else. I checked their website. They claim to kill 99.9% of “germs” including influenza a, but I guess the cdn feds don’t approve it.
 

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Probably a good time to adopt a habit I have followed for years, since living in SE Asia. Take off your shoes and leave them outside.
Only really practical if you have a weather-proof area to keep your shoes, unless you want shoes full of snow in January.
 

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my bad. I saw the “pine”. I think they are different. I did for sure see Pine-sol Talked about somewhere else. I checked their website. They claim to kill 99.9% of “germs” including influenza a, but I guess the cdn feds don’t approve it.
I compared the activity ingredient on the list with my pine sol, there were different. I will just keep using it for inside until it’s done.
 

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Only really practical if you have a weather-proof area to keep your shoes, unless you want shoes full of snow in January.
I fully expected someone too make that point.

We have a well-covered porch, so snow or rain filling is not an issue. However, I'll admit to not feeling all warm and fuzzy about donning frozen footwear during the occasional freezing weather we see here in winter. So, sometimes we bend the rules a bit and doff footwear outside the door, but park it on a mat inside for overnight.
 

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Probably a good time to adopt a habit I have followed for years, since living in SE Asia. Take off your shoes and leave them outside.
The neighbours dog likes to wear shoes left outside the door. Though they seam to never to return them. Must get buried with the bones in the flower garden. Maybe that is why some countries eat dogs cheaper then sending to dog prison.
 

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Going to crazy with cleaning weakens the immune system plus destroys the good germs (correct name ?) that fight the bad.

Just like there is no way the government can control the temp of the earth to .5 degrees. There is no way the government can control the spread of germs. No wonder they have us all locked down they are power tripping.

Do you really think they can just turn on the economy like a light switch & it will turn on ? The longer its off the longer to get going.

These guys think everyone can just stop producing & just print & hand out money & we will prosper
 

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Only really practical if you have a weather-proof area to keep your shoes, unless you want shoes full of snow in January.
I have never worn shoes inside my home in my entire life. I thought that was the case with most if not all Canadians. In the UK, the opposite is the case, most if not all wear their shoes in their homes.

Our shoes are put on and taken off in the breezeway between the house and garage. It is really just another part of the house separated by a door from the kitchen and a door from the garage as well as an outside door at each end of the breezeway. It's also heated.
 

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Not to make light of the situation, but I wonder if there will be a spike of environmental allergies in the next few years as a second order effect. It was speculated that the increased usage of cleaning products, either due to the chemicals or increased cleanliness, has adversely affected children's immune systems which made them more susceptible to allergies.

Now that people are increasing their cleaning habits, it might end up increasing this sort of interaction.

Regarding shoes, well, don't most houses have a foyer where you can take off your shoes/boots?
 

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Not to make light of the situation, but I wonder if there will be a spike of environmental allergies in the next few years as a second order effect. It was speculated that the increased usage of cleaning products, either due to the chemicals or increased cleanliness, has adversely affected children's immune systems which made them more susceptible to allergies.

Now that people are increasing their cleaning habits, it might end up increasing this sort of interaction.

Regarding shoes, well, don't most houses have a foyer where you can take off your shoes/boots?
I've always asked myself where did all these allergies in children 'suddenly' come from? As a youngster, I don't recall anyone I knew in school having allergies other than hay fever perhaps. A peanut allergy was unheard of. It seems in the last few generations, allergies of all kinds have suddenly popped up.
 

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I've always asked myself where did all these allergies in children 'suddenly' come from? As a youngster, I don't recall anyone I knew in school having allergies other than hay fever perhaps. A peanut allergy was unheard of. It seems in the last few generations, allergies of all kinds have suddenly popped up.
Lots of theories, but it's probably a combination of a number of factors: environmental, increased hygiene practices, changing diets, etc. I doubt it can really be pinned down to a single reason.
Why the world is becoming more allergic
 
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