Canadian Money Forum banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2,054 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you that are up on REIT's and down on real property, you might want to consider whether you like the current fundamental valuations of the RE market in it's entirety.

The entire sector may suffer a correction in the near term and this will affect the value of your REITs as well. The value of the underlying assets may well come under scrutiny.

This is just a thought I have, do your own due diligence
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,256 Posts
IMHO, REITs are over-valued like crazy these days.
It's a combination of the over-heated RE market, a flight to the high yields and perhaps because there's nothing else out there really.
And a belief (maybe misplaced - arguable) that the Canadian RE market is different and will not follow the US fate.
So such risks (real and imagined) are being ignored.

I'm personally not into REITs and don't plan to be in a big way anytime soon.
But then I'm not into RE in any other shape or form either (other than owning my home).
I follow the XRE movements and if there's a significant correction to bring it in the $8 - $10 range, I might buy some.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15,917 Posts
Like everything else I own, I use a timing strategy. If/when REITs roll over, I'll sell. The fundamentals aren't all that bad at the moment, and I still have a good ten percent above my sell signal at the moment. That's okay though, because that 10 percent is mostly appreciation from the last month.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
Try to keep in mind that there are many different types of REITs. Health Care, Retail, Residential, Office and Mortgage REITs are discussed in the following article.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/glob...its-and-how-to-invest-in-them/article1674579/

I agree with Harold that there has been a flight to yield seeking investments and some REIT's are overvalued...but what sector doesn't have something overvalued...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
The entire sector may suffer a correction in the near term and this will affect the value of your REITs as well. The value of the underlying assets may well come under scrutiny.
I doubt all REIT sectors would fall at once , if you're diversified in commercial/industrial/residential sectors you should be fairly well protected.
If a REIT is profitable , short term swings in the value of the assets shouldn't mean all that much , they may result in slightly higher rates when the REIT is re-financing , a profitable well run REIT should still be able to maintain a decent distribution until the markets return , IMHO.

I am looking to add some REIT shares to my portfolio and was wondering this. When there is a correcton on the residential side, will this effect the commercial real estate as well?
In my opinion , no.
Even a major correction in residential housing prices doesn't necessarily mean any less profitability for REITs in the residential sector either , such as apartment REITs or mobile home park REITs.

My portfolio is 80% or more in REITs right now and the distributions are adding up fast , where else you gonna get 14% these days?

I did however just sell one of my winners , RMM.UN , it was up 53% from my entry price and I didn't see much more upside to it in the near future , that kind of profit I just can't resist taking , if they had raised their distribution to match , I would have held it.

The money (plus 53%) is now in higher paying smaller cap REITs , increasing my income substantially.

I agree with Harold that there has been a flight to yield seeking investments and some REIT's are overvalued
I agree some REITS are over valued , especially the large caps , but I still think the flight to REITs has not reached its peak yet.

I personally don't own any real estate of my own and probably never will again.
I don't see any downside to REITs in the near future.
I like the current risk/reward ratio in REITs as compared to a portfolio of speculative investments that provide no income.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,054 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If the residential real estate market corrects, as it is showing signs of doing, with prices down 3.3% last month and 2% already this month and volume of sales down as well, then I'm thinking that this will spread.

Commercial and multi family prices are also overblown as evidenced by the low cap rates that make actual returns on their investment difficult.

I have a post coming up on Million Dollar Journey that goes into more detail.

Real Estate is a sector, like oil is a sector and when the sector takes a hit every stock within that class takes a hit. People aren't that smart as to differentiate.

That's my theory anyways.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15,917 Posts
I have to agree. REITs are all pretty highly correlated, even if they are in different spaces. They have been fantastic investments since the market bottom. They are one of the best performing asset classes, and they are my only sector (besides gold) that is well above my sell signal. I can't complain about their run, but I don't expect to get much more return from them out of this trade. I've been out of equities since May and June, and waiting for a crash. The market is stubbornly bouncing around the buy/sell signal.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Oh and diversifying does not mean buying a bunch of stocks in the same asset class.

For instance if you buy all banks but different kinds of banks that will not save your *** if the financial sector takes a hit.

Just saying...:confused:
And yet it does make you diversified within that sector (thanks for the input , but this is not 5th grade here:rolleyes:) , no matter what you feel about people abilities to differentiate between different real estate classes.

Also , as I said , well run profitable REITs shouldn't have to cut distributions due to short term volatility in share prices , making them a desirable income producing investment in these unsettled markets.

Just sayin'........:confused:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,054 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The post is up at Million Dollar Journey.

http://www.milliondollarjourney.com/the-downside-of-owning-reits.htm

BTW, I'm not advocating freaking out and selling all your REITs. Real estate has been a staple and has been steadily going up for the last 20 years.

I am urging people to really think about and consider the potential downfall of being too heavily invested in REIT's right now.

I do not claim to know what the future holds for the real estate market. I am also not a real estate bear, I believe that real estate does have value and you can make money owning it or REIT's but I'm not sure that present values are sustainable in any scenario.

Consider that some of the people reading this may be people who are at retirement age who love the steady distributions and yields provided by REITs. I could not in all conscience help but be terrified for those people as every day we are getting rather grim news about the RE market.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Consider that some of the people reading this may be people who are at retirement age who love the steady distributions and yields provided by REITs. I could not in all conscience help but be terrified for those people as every day we are getting rather grim news about the RE market.
Most of the bad news I hear lately is about the "housing" market , not necessarily the RE market in general.
The lady who wrote the blurb you link to even said herself "I am not happy with the real estate market, every day there are headlines about the residential real estate market."

I believe there is a huge disconnect between the housing market and the commercial/industrial RE market.

I'm five years from retirement , I'm not terrified.

I like getting 14%.

And I'll say again , well run profitable REITs shouldn't have to cut distributions due to short term volatility in share prices , making them a desirable income producing investment in these unsettled markets.

But in my case , I own no actual RE other than that in my REIT portfolio , and I probably have less money in that than most homeowners have in their homes , especially when you consider insurance , taxes , maintenance etc.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
I am urging people to really think about and consider the potential downfall of being too heavily invested in REIT's right now.
The same could be said of any asset class , that's nothing new , greater diversification will protect you from greater losses , in some instances , but some , like me , feel that greater diversification leads to mediocre returns.

I'm willing to take more risk and be where the money is.

Interesting little blurb , but just his opinion , he even contradicts himself in some ways.

He states " But as we've seen, it's a seller's market."

With all the doom and gloom you claim is prevalent in RE , how can it still be a sellers market?

To believe what he says , you would have to assume that he knows more about REITs than the people running them , and that I doubt.

There are may ways to value REITs and I don't have all the answers either , but a 14% return has got to be worth a little extra risk , to me anyway.

If you feel the RE market in general is ready to crash , then by all means get out of it , I feel the worst is over , we are in a new economy , RE prices may or may not return to previous highs , but I'm not expecting any great catastrophe in RE either , especially the commercial/industrial sector.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,492 Posts
...
There are may ways to value REITs and I don't have all the answers either , but a 14% return has got to be worth a little extra risk , to me anyway...
This brings up another point that I make with investors. How much risk are you willing to take for extra returns.

If you are getting 14% when the market overall is producing 4% yield plus capital appreciation, how much capital appreciation are you counting on? If the answer is 10%, then do you really believe that RE is going to increase at 8% to 10% without limit?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15,917 Posts
This brings up another point that I make with investors. How much risk are you willing to take for extra returns.

If you are getting 14% when the market overall is producing 4% yield plus capital appreciation, how much capital appreciation are you counting on? If the answer is 10%, then do you really believe that RE is going to increase at 8% to 10% without limit?
REITs are leveraged. They don't need continuous 8% appreciation in underlying RE to return 8%.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,256 Posts
Out of curiosity, which REITs are yielding 14%?
I look at the standard large cap REITs (like the ones that are part of XRE) and none of them seem to be more than 7% yield.
XRE yields 6% or less (depending on its current trading price).
Are these private REITs?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Small cap REITS are riskier but pay much better.

TR.UN is yielding 17% at current share price , it's a riskier play tho because they may not qualify as a REIT next year.

BTB.UN is yielding almost 12% , I'm getting over 14% considering my entry price which is much less than todays share price.

CRH.UN is yielding almost 13% at current share price.

SRQ.UN is yielding almost 12% a current price.

I hold all of the above as well as some other small cap REITs and my average comes out to 14% or better

RMM.UN was paying me over 14% considering my entry price , but I sold it recently because share price was up 53% and I didn't see much more upside to it , that kind of profit I like to lock in , unless they up their distribution to match the increase in price , then I will hold.

So as you can see , I am happy at 14% income with 53% capital gain from one of my bigger holdings , that 53% is now re-invested at 14% or so , it's adding up fast.

Some of these REITs even give you a 1 or 2% bonus if you choose to DRIP instead of taking cash , that again adds to the bottom line.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top