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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

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Don't see what this has to do with Canada. Should be a dispute with phillipines and the company. Take them to court, fine them etc.
 

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We do like to export our pollution, plastics to Mexico & China, landfill garbage to Michigan,and effluent to St Lawrence seaway and Straits of Juan de Fuca. Makes us feel warm & cozy we are doing our part.
 

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Don't see what this has to do with Canada. Should be a dispute with phillipines and the company. Take them to court, fine them etc.
In what court?

A Philipino court has already ruled and for some reason, the Canadian gov't claims there is no Canadian legal authority to force Chronic Inc to take the trash back.
Some argue that this violates the Basel Convention while the Canadian gov't position is that the trash is "not hazardous waste".


The Canadian gov't wants to increase trade etc. yet does not want to deal with the issue effectively like South Korea did for a similar issue.


Cheers
 

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We should be recycling our garbage into oil. The technology has been available for years, why aren't we using it?
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/401952/garbage-into-oil/
It doesn't work that well yet.
BioGas is pretty effective, but the systems tend to get unbalanced, then they stink, a lot, for miles.

These systems are just not very cost effecitve, and they don't handle the diverse post consumer waste well. Industrial users have very high recycling rates.
You get top dollar when you can sell back large volumes of steel, at specific grades.
"This dumpster is 304 stainless, and this is 1080"<< that gets premium value.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
In what court?

A Philipino court has already ruled and for some reason, the Canadian gov't claims there is no Canadian legal authority to force Chronic Inc to take the trash back.
Some argue that this violates the Basel Convention while the Canadian gov't position is that the trash is "not hazardous waste".



The Canadian gov't wants to increase trade etc. yet does not want to deal with the issue effectively like South Korea did for a similar issue.


Cheers
...+1.

And so far the "company" remains nameless and off the hook. And "who, exactly" will be paying to have this resolved. The Canadian "government" aka Canadian "taxpayers". Talk about incompetency at its finest.


https://www.thestar.com/calgary/2019/04/24/how-did-103-containers-of-canadas-rotting-garbage-end-up-in-the-philippines.html
... International law is on the Philippines’ side. The United Nations’ Basel Convention is a treaty that went into force in 1992 and forbids countries from dumping illegal waste in developing nations without their informed consent. Canada has ratified this convention, meaning they’re legally bound to it.

This is why the Canadian government’s inaction to remove the waste and find a way to dispose of it themselves is illegal, Cooper said. She added that even if the containers were sent by a Canadian company, it’s the government’s responsibility to clean it up.

But as a taxpayer, Cooper hopes the government is able to find a way for the company behind the mess to pay for it. ...
... we can all hope the government can find a way out of this mess within the week. I don't want to see projectiles coming our way... possibly with those shitpments attached to them.
 

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It doesn't work that well yet.
BioGas is pretty effective, but the systems tend to get unbalanced, then they stink, a lot, for miles.

These systems are just not very cost effecitve, and they don't handle the diverse post consumer waste well. Industrial users have very high recycling rates.
You get top dollar when you can sell back large volumes of steel, at specific grades.
"This dumpster is 304 stainless, and this is 1080"<< that gets premium value.
It's got to be more cost effective than shipping garbage to the Philippines or Michigan, and paying disposal fees besides. The information I have seen is that turning garbage into oil returns 5 units of energy for every 1 unit expended. I will trade garbage for gasoline or diesel fuel any day.
 

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Here's a 2014 interview with the Whitby owner Jim Makris: https://www.durhamregion.com/news-story/4367282-whitby-recycler-denies-shipping-trash-to-philippines/

I'm still not clear what the full story is here. Not sure how this has moved from corporate liability to the Feds. I suspect Chronic closed up. It mentions that they had started a recycling plant there as well. Chronic doesn't seem to be at 113 Brock St anymore.

I notice aswell that somehowthereported number of containers startedat 50 but now103 are being discussed.
 

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The quote from the Basel Convention would seem to explain why it is the Canadian government's problem to fix. The government can try to go after this ghost corporation Chronic for costs, but they can't pass responsibility back to the Philippines. And they could then spend years trying to go after the waste producers who presumably paid Chronic to dispose of it, without knowing how they would do it. But this was a Canadian business, exporting Canadian waste. Whether or not they were doing so illegally or unethically, the buck still stops with the Canadian government for letting this happen.
 

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Thanks for the additional info.

I also found this from the philstar link:

November 19, 2015 - Trudeau said he has been made aware of the situation and that his government is in the process of coming up with a solution to the problem. Local activists have been urging the new Canadian prime minister, sworn into power two weeks ago, to do something about the issue.
"I know that this has exposed a problem that needs fixing within our legislation that we're going to lean into and ensure happens," he said at a press conference at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation's International Media Center in Pasay City.

Read more at https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2015/11/19/1523755/trudeau-vows-go-after-garbage-dumping-canadian-companies#Z2WPotPqIsTF5CL7.99

Here we are nearly 4 years later! **Any majority-government legislation yet? I wonder why they haven't seen fit to fix this file using taxpayer dollars yet?
In hindsight, maybe Mckenna-Freeland should have peeled some of their departmental resources off the carbon tax rhetoric to fix this issue before it became yet another dipomatic embarressment.

**Added: Sounds like some changes were made in 2016, per: In 2016, the Canadian government tweaked its laws on hazardous waste shipments, pointing to the Philippines case as a reason to update the regulations on exporting garbage.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So the company was really called Chronic? What a name ... so ironic too.
 
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