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You can’t do that, it would be unfair. Ask any socialist your money is their money. You earn it, they spend it, equal responsibility, fair division of wealth. Just don’t touch his boat, that’s his.
 

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Well I'm not saying take it away, just freeze it in time and don't let it grow, much like his maturity.
 

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With tax incentives, the way our economy is structured to favour debt over currency, and the endless rounds of money printing (quantitative easing); buying is not a choice, it's a necessity. It's just a matter of what you buy, where you buy, and whether you buy it as an asset that generates cash, or an asset that functions as a store of value.

Oh and also, when you buy... of course.

In fact: I was planning to buy a property this year (2020). Then covid happened...

And here's the thing: While the real estate agent I'm working with has been very helpful, and I've been able to get considerable access to data to crunch my own numbers to see what's really happening with the market; I'm still on the fence, favouring renting until this thing is truly resolved.

Where I live it looks like a sellers market. It acts like a sellers market. And agents are telling us that we should make competitive offers. But I'm not buying it!

We haven't even begun to see the actual economic fallout, nationally, let alone globally. In the 2008 crisis, delinquency rates for just sub-prime mortgages rose from ~5% to 18%; and we had a price collapse ranging between %20 to %50 (depending on where you were and what property you were talking about). Last I checked, the delinquency rate collectively for rents and mortgages across all buckets are around 40%!! It's scary. I think it's scary to a degree that the human brain is incapable of comprehending; like how we can't mentally visualise the difference between 1,000 and 1,000,000 effectively.

Plus when the head of the Bank of Canada comes out and claims that they are pinning interest rates to the floor for the foreseeable future; I favour doing the opposite of what the majority is expected to do. I did that in the 2008 crisis, and ended up selling my home back then for a windfall profit.

So... I wouldn't tell you what to do. But I'll tell you what I'm doing: Staying approved for finances, watching the market, seeing properties (virtually or when they are empty), paying attention to government meddling in the market via policy changes and forbearance packages, and positioning to buy the dip.
 
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