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I am fairly new to the personal finance world, but I am finding it fascinating so far. I have been enjoying reading through some personal finance books and would like to read some more. So far, I have read "The Wealthy Barber", "Rich Dad, Poor Dad", Gordon Pape's "Tax Free Savings Accounts" and I am currently reading "The Naked Investor". What are the "must-read" books that you guys would recommend so that I can keep learning?
 

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A little off of investing, but I like 'The perfect mortgage" by Alan Silverstein, he is a Canadian RE lawyer. A good read for any homeower, or potential one.

I enjoyed 'the lazy investor' by Derek Foster. It is a little simplistic. But sometimes that makes for an easy read.
 

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I am fairly new to the personal finance world, but I am finding it fascinating so far. I have been enjoying reading through some personal finance books and would like to read some more. So far, I have read "The Wealthy Barber", "Rich Dad, Poor Dad", Gordon Pape's "Tax Free Savings Accounts" and I am currently reading "The Naked Investor". What are the "must-read" books that you guys would recommend so that I can keep learning?
Check out this thread:

http://www.canadianmoneyforum.com/showthread.php?t=33
 

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I am currently running out of books to read ;) so I am looking for one or two books to pick up.

A little off of investing, but I like 'The perfect mortgage" by Alan Silverstein, he is a Canadian RE lawyer. A good read for any homeower, or potential one.
The book was published in '89 - is the book still relevant in today's market and economy?

The Money Book for the Young, Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your 20s and 30s.
This one also looks interesting.

How's other forum members feel about these 2 books? Would they make a good and useful read, also considering that the economy situation and market is kinda changed a bit in the last year or so.

I am in a position where I have no debt and I am pretty careful with my money, so any book that talks about you have to live within your means and paying off your debt would be irrelevant for me. Any more recommendation? Thanks!
 

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For the complete novice I would recommend any or all of the "Dummies" series, depending what aspects of personal finance you need information on.

Mutual Funds for Canadians for Dummies, 2nd ed. Andrew Bell. Pub. 2002. The specific fund references are getting dated because of the way markets have changed radically since 2001, but still an excellent introduction to what mutual funds are all about. Good common sense advice for the average investor

Personal Finance for Canadians for Dummies, 4th ed. (2006) Eric Tyson & Tony Martin

Investing for Canadians for Dummies, 3rd ed. Eric Tyson & Tony Martin
For the more advanced investor, but has a chapter on mutual funds.

Stock Investing for Canadians for Dummies. Andrew Dagys & Paul Mladjenovic

Money Management for Canadians All-in-One Desk Reference for Dummies, 2nd Ed. Andrew Bell, Andrew Dagys & Paul Mladjenovic; Tony Inannou w. Heather Ball; Margaret Kerr & JoAnn Kurtz; John Lawrence Reynolds; Kathleen Sindell. I haven’t read this one, seems to include compilations of material from some of the other books.
 

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"The Total Money Makeover" - Dave Ramsey (definitely start here)
"The Millionaire Next Door" - (old but still relevant in a lot of ways)
 

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This may be obvious, but you might want to check out these books from the library first before deciding which ones to buy. Some will be more useful to you than others. People always seem to recommend The Four Pillars of Investing, so I bought a copy last year but really disliked it; I ended up selling mine on Amazon.
 

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I am currently running out of books to read ;) so I am looking for one or two books to pick up.

Cal said:
A little off of investing, but I like 'The perfect mortgage" by Alan Silverstein, he is a Canadian RE lawyer. A good read for any homeower, or potential one.
The book was published in '89 - is the book still relevant in today's market and economy?

urvi88 said:
The Money Book for the Young, Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your 20s and 30s.
This one also looks interesting.

How's other forum members feel about these 2 books? Would they make a good and useful read, also considering that the economy situation and market is kinda changed a bit in the last year or so.
Any comment on how those 2 books whether they are still relevant for today's read?
 

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This may be obvious, but you might want to check out these books from the library first before deciding which ones to buy. Some will be more useful to you than others. People always seem to recommend The Four Pillars of Investing, so I bought a copy last year but really disliked it.

Regards

Olympus

_____
dossier surendettement
 

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[Scans bookshelf]

The must-read investing books I can personally recommend (The Intelligent Investor, For Dummies books) have already been mentioned.

Total Money Makeover - Dave Ramsey
Automatic Millionaire - David Bach
Smart Couples Finish Rich - David Bach

These books might seem a bit hokey, but their concepts are powerful and they work. I've used TMM to teach the 7 Baby Steps and the Debt Snowball concept to my own clients (and family, and friends), and they have gotten results. When people figure out their "Latté Factor" (found in the latter two books), it's a rude wake-up call.

Give these books a read, if you're also looking to manage your income and expenses more responsibly.
 

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1. Wealthy Barber - on second reading 20 years later, it contains everything a person needs for financial
planning
2. Wealthy Barber Returns - updates things that proved wrong in first book, and general musings on
money financial planning.
Both David Chilton - A brilliant, common sense guy as well as being quite funny. A broker who turned his back on the financial industry.
3. Little book of common sense Investing - why indexing is superior - John Bogle
4. Money sense guide to the perfect portfolio - teaches how to implement the above.
5. Millionaire teacher. Interesting. Reinforces above.
Really, all a person needs to know. And very quick easy reads.
I see the following mentioned a lot, so will read eventually for curiosity:
Four Pillars of Investing
Common Sense on Mutual Funds
A Randomn Walk Down Wall Street
Unconventional Success: A Fundamental Approach to Personal Investment
All heavier reading, I think.
I have Benjamin Grahams Intelligent Investor, and Jeremy Siegals Stocks for the Long Run, but I never
bothered reading as I turned to indexing

Note: Kiosaki Is a scam artist. Maybe good for inspiration, however his coauthor is suing him. Michelle Berube mentions a real estate author in the states who is the best, apparently. Name escapes me, unfortunately. He has a scam list, Kiosaki is on it, and possibly has the most scathing review I've ever read. Read up to about five books in his series. Repetitive, simplified, and inappropriate for investing. Maybe get rich quick, if you are lucky. Also a pyramid scheme.

Interestingly the poor dad is a teacher. I found it amusing that David Chiltons dad was a teacher and So is the millionaire teacher!
 

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^ +1 ... excellent list above with #1 and #2 (The Wealthy Barber + Returns) being great starters. There is also a list of great reads from the link in post #3 also as with the Dummies series in post #6 as well.

Since there are so many great reads from these "favourite or best personal finance" books, I would focus on start with the book based on what you wish to accomplish first may it be financial planning, stocks investing/trading, retirement planning, etc.
 

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MoneySense Guide to the Perfect Portfolio by Dan Bortolotti (The guy behind the Canadian Couch Potato website), from 2013.

A great introduction, discussion, and how-to for the couch potato portfolio. Straight-forward, easy to read and understand.

Might be limited to the online editions (iTunes/Amazon/Kobo) because it looks like physical copies aren't being printed at this point.
 
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